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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Stockholm, May 22, 2017 — Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) announces that the trading in Bioservo Technologies AB’s shares (short name: BIOS) commenced today on Nasdaq First North in Stockholm. Bioservo Technologies belongs to the health care sector and is the 43rd company to be admitted to trading on Nasdaq’s Nordic markets* in 2017. Bioservo Technologies is a Swedish company developing muscle strengthening devices based on its patented robotic SEM™ technology. Its lead product, the SEM Glove™, strengthens the users’ grip and either compensates where power is lacking or adds extra force and endurance. Bioservo Technologies was founded in 2006 as a result of a collaboration between the Karolinska University hospital and the Royal Institute of Technology. For more information, please visit www.bioservo.se. ”We are both delighted and proud to reach this milestone, which together with the share issue is an important step to further strengthen our position,” said Erik Landgren, CEO of Bioservo Technologies. “As a listed company, we have a seal of approval when entering the commercial phase in the beginning of next year. I would like to thank the whole team and everyone around us who have supported us to get to where we are today.” “We welcome Bioservo Technologies to Nasdaq First North,” said Adam Kostyál, SVP and Head of European listings at Nasdaq. “Bioservo Technologies operates in an exciting field and we look forward to supporting them on their continued journey as a publicly traded company.” Bioservo Technologies AB has appointed FNCA Sweden AB as the Certified Adviser. *Main markets and Nasdaq First North at Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq First North is regulated as a multilateral trading facility, operated by the different exchanges within Nasdaq Nordic (Nasdaq First North Denmark is regulated as an alternative marketplace). It does not have the legal status as an EU-regulated market. Companies at Nasdaq First North are subject to the rules of Nasdaq First North and not the legal requirements for admission to trading on a regulated market. The risk in such an investment may be higher than on the main market. Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) is a leading global provider of trading, clearing, exchange technology, listing, information and public company services. Through its diverse portfolio of solutions, Nasdaq enables customers to plan, optimize and execute their business vision with confidence, using proven technologies that provide transparency and insight for navigating today's global capital markets. As the creator of the world's first electronic stock market, its technology powers more than 89 marketplaces in 50 countries, and 1 in 10 of the world's securities transactions. Nasdaq is home to 3,800 total listings with a market value of $11 trillion. To learn more, visit: http://business.nasdaq.com Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland, Nasdaq Riga, Nasdaq Stockholm, Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing and Nasdaq Broker Services are respectively brand names for the regulated markets of Nasdaq Copenhagen A/S, Nasdaq Helsinki Ltd., Nasdaq Iceland hf., Nasdaq Riga, AS, Nasdaq Stockholm AB, Nasdaq Tallinn AS, AB Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing AB and Nasdaq Broker Services AB. Nasdaq Nordic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq Baltic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Riga and Nasdaq Vilnius. The matters described herein contain forward-looking statements that are made under the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements include, but are not limited to, statements about Nasdaq and its products and offerings. We caution that these statements are not guarantees of future performance. Actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties or other factors beyond Nasdaq's control. These factors include, but are not limited to factors detailed in Nasdaq's annual report on Form 10-K, and periodic reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. We undertake no obligation to release any revisions to any forward-looking statements.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Stockholm, May 22, 2017 — Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) announces that the trading in Bioservo Technologies AB’s shares (short name: BIOS) commenced today on Nasdaq First North in Stockholm. Bioservo Technologies belongs to the health care sector and is the 43rd company to be admitted to trading on Nasdaq’s Nordic markets* in 2017. Bioservo Technologies is a Swedish company developing muscle strengthening devices based on its patented robotic SEM™ technology. Its lead product, the SEM Glove™, strengthens the users’ grip and either compensates where power is lacking or adds extra force and endurance. Bioservo Technologies was founded in 2006 as a result of a collaboration between the Karolinska University hospital and the Royal Institute of Technology. For more information, please visit www.bioservo.se. ”We are both delighted and proud to reach this milestone, which together with the share issue is an important step to further strengthen our position,” said Erik Landgren, CEO of Bioservo Technologies. “As a listed company, we have a seal of approval when entering the commercial phase in the beginning of next year. I would like to thank the whole team and everyone around us who have supported us to get to where we are today.” “We welcome Bioservo Technologies to Nasdaq First North,” said Adam Kostyál, SVP and Head of European listings at Nasdaq. “Bioservo Technologies operates in an exciting field and we look forward to supporting them on their continued journey as a publicly traded company.” Bioservo Technologies AB has appointed FNCA Sweden AB as the Certified Adviser. *Main markets and Nasdaq First North at Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq First North is regulated as a multilateral trading facility, operated by the different exchanges within Nasdaq Nordic (Nasdaq First North Denmark is regulated as an alternative marketplace). It does not have the legal status as an EU-regulated market. Companies at Nasdaq First North are subject to the rules of Nasdaq First North and not the legal requirements for admission to trading on a regulated market. The risk in such an investment may be higher than on the main market. Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) is a leading global provider of trading, clearing, exchange technology, listing, information and public company services. Through its diverse portfolio of solutions, Nasdaq enables customers to plan, optimize and execute their business vision with confidence, using proven technologies that provide transparency and insight for navigating today's global capital markets. As the creator of the world's first electronic stock market, its technology powers more than 89 marketplaces in 50 countries, and 1 in 10 of the world's securities transactions. Nasdaq is home to 3,800 total listings with a market value of $11 trillion. To learn more, visit: http://business.nasdaq.com Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland, Nasdaq Riga, Nasdaq Stockholm, Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing and Nasdaq Broker Services are respectively brand names for the regulated markets of Nasdaq Copenhagen A/S, Nasdaq Helsinki Ltd., Nasdaq Iceland hf., Nasdaq Riga, AS, Nasdaq Stockholm AB, Nasdaq Tallinn AS, AB Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing AB and Nasdaq Broker Services AB. Nasdaq Nordic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq Baltic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Riga and Nasdaq Vilnius. The matters described herein contain forward-looking statements that are made under the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements include, but are not limited to, statements about Nasdaq and its products and offerings. We caution that these statements are not guarantees of future performance. Actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties or other factors beyond Nasdaq's control. These factors include, but are not limited to factors detailed in Nasdaq's annual report on Form 10-K, and periodic reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. We undertake no obligation to release any revisions to any forward-looking statements.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Stockholm, May 22, 2017 — Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) announces that the trading in Bioservo Technologies AB’s shares (short name: BIOS) commenced today on Nasdaq First North in Stockholm. Bioservo Technologies belongs to the health care sector and is the 43rd company to be admitted to trading on Nasdaq’s Nordic markets* in 2017. Bioservo Technologies is a Swedish company developing muscle strengthening devices based on its patented robotic SEM™ technology. Its lead product, the SEM Glove™, strengthens the users’ grip and either compensates where power is lacking or adds extra force and endurance. Bioservo Technologies was founded in 2006 as a result of a collaboration between the Karolinska University hospital and the Royal Institute of Technology. For more information, please visit www.bioservo.se. ”We are both delighted and proud to reach this milestone, which together with the share issue is an important step to further strengthen our position,” said Erik Landgren, CEO of Bioservo Technologies. “As a listed company, we have a seal of approval when entering the commercial phase in the beginning of next year. I would like to thank the whole team and everyone around us who have supported us to get to where we are today.” “We welcome Bioservo Technologies to Nasdaq First North,” said Adam Kostyál, SVP and Head of European listings at Nasdaq. “Bioservo Technologies operates in an exciting field and we look forward to supporting them on their continued journey as a publicly traded company.” Bioservo Technologies AB has appointed FNCA Sweden AB as the Certified Adviser. *Main markets and Nasdaq First North at Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq First North is regulated as a multilateral trading facility, operated by the different exchanges within Nasdaq Nordic (Nasdaq First North Denmark is regulated as an alternative marketplace). It does not have the legal status as an EU-regulated market. Companies at Nasdaq First North are subject to the rules of Nasdaq First North and not the legal requirements for admission to trading on a regulated market. The risk in such an investment may be higher than on the main market. Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) is a leading global provider of trading, clearing, exchange technology, listing, information and public company services. Through its diverse portfolio of solutions, Nasdaq enables customers to plan, optimize and execute their business vision with confidence, using proven technologies that provide transparency and insight for navigating today's global capital markets. As the creator of the world's first electronic stock market, its technology powers more than 89 marketplaces in 50 countries, and 1 in 10 of the world's securities transactions. Nasdaq is home to 3,800 total listings with a market value of $11 trillion. To learn more, visit: http://business.nasdaq.com Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland, Nasdaq Riga, Nasdaq Stockholm, Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing and Nasdaq Broker Services are respectively brand names for the regulated markets of Nasdaq Copenhagen A/S, Nasdaq Helsinki Ltd., Nasdaq Iceland hf., Nasdaq Riga, AS, Nasdaq Stockholm AB, Nasdaq Tallinn AS, AB Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing AB and Nasdaq Broker Services AB. Nasdaq Nordic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq Baltic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Riga and Nasdaq Vilnius. The matters described herein contain forward-looking statements that are made under the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements include, but are not limited to, statements about Nasdaq and its products and offerings. We caution that these statements are not guarantees of future performance. Actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties or other factors beyond Nasdaq's control. These factors include, but are not limited to factors detailed in Nasdaq's annual report on Form 10-K, and periodic reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. We undertake no obligation to release any revisions to any forward-looking statements.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Stockholm, May 22, 2017 — Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) announces that the trading in Bioservo Technologies AB’s shares (short name: BIOS) commenced today on Nasdaq First North in Stockholm. Bioservo Technologies belongs to the health care sector and is the 43rd company to be admitted to trading on Nasdaq’s Nordic markets* in 2017. Bioservo Technologies is a Swedish company developing muscle strengthening devices based on its patented robotic SEM™ technology. Its lead product, the SEM Glove™, strengthens the users’ grip and either compensates where power is lacking or adds extra force and endurance. Bioservo Technologies was founded in 2006 as a result of a collaboration between the Karolinska University hospital and the Royal Institute of Technology. For more information, please visit www.bioservo.se. ”We are both delighted and proud to reach this milestone, which together with the share issue is an important step to further strengthen our position,” said Erik Landgren, CEO of Bioservo Technologies. “As a listed company, we have a seal of approval when entering the commercial phase in the beginning of next year. I would like to thank the whole team and everyone around us who have supported us to get to where we are today.” “We welcome Bioservo Technologies to Nasdaq First North,” said Adam Kostyál, SVP and Head of European listings at Nasdaq. “Bioservo Technologies operates in an exciting field and we look forward to supporting them on their continued journey as a publicly traded company.” Bioservo Technologies AB has appointed FNCA Sweden AB as the Certified Adviser. *Main markets and Nasdaq First North at Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq First North is regulated as a multilateral trading facility, operated by the different exchanges within Nasdaq Nordic (Nasdaq First North Denmark is regulated as an alternative marketplace). It does not have the legal status as an EU-regulated market. Companies at Nasdaq First North are subject to the rules of Nasdaq First North and not the legal requirements for admission to trading on a regulated market. The risk in such an investment may be higher than on the main market. Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) is a leading global provider of trading, clearing, exchange technology, listing, information and public company services. Through its diverse portfolio of solutions, Nasdaq enables customers to plan, optimize and execute their business vision with confidence, using proven technologies that provide transparency and insight for navigating today's global capital markets. As the creator of the world's first electronic stock market, its technology powers more than 89 marketplaces in 50 countries, and 1 in 10 of the world's securities transactions. Nasdaq is home to 3,800 total listings with a market value of $11 trillion. To learn more, visit: http://business.nasdaq.com Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland, Nasdaq Riga, Nasdaq Stockholm, Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing and Nasdaq Broker Services are respectively brand names for the regulated markets of Nasdaq Copenhagen A/S, Nasdaq Helsinki Ltd., Nasdaq Iceland hf., Nasdaq Riga, AS, Nasdaq Stockholm AB, Nasdaq Tallinn AS, AB Nasdaq Vilnius, Nasdaq Clearing AB and Nasdaq Broker Services AB. Nasdaq Nordic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Copenhagen, Nasdaq Helsinki, Nasdaq Iceland and Nasdaq Stockholm. Nasdaq Baltic represents the common offering by Nasdaq Tallinn, Nasdaq Riga and Nasdaq Vilnius. The matters described herein contain forward-looking statements that are made under the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements include, but are not limited to, statements about Nasdaq and its products and offerings. We caution that these statements are not guarantees of future performance. Actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties or other factors beyond Nasdaq's control. These factors include, but are not limited to factors detailed in Nasdaq's annual report on Form 10-K, and periodic reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. We undertake no obligation to release any revisions to any forward-looking statements.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: phys.org

Researchers working at the Aalto University and at the Royal Institute of Technology KTH in Stockholm have developed a new method for measuring the number of single walled carbon nanotubes and their concentration in a carbon nanotube layer. The novel method is based on measurement of the Raman spectrum together with precise measurement of mass and optical absorbance. The dependence of the number of the CNTs on the phonon scattering intensity is observed. This method opens an opportunity for the quantitative mapping of sp2 bonded carbon atom distribution (i.e. those atoms that form the carbon nanotubes with bonds to three other carbon atoms) in the CNT layers with a resolution limited by the focused laser spot size. The carbon nanotube (CNT) has a structure of a rolled single layer of graphene, where each carbon atom is bonded with three other carbon atoms. Basically the nanotube can be considered as one large molecule. The length of a CNT varies from one to one hundred micrometers while its diameter is of the order of one nanometer CNT based materials are intensively studied due to a number of novel and unique properties that make them potentially useful in a wide range of applications. Extremely thin CNT layers offer outstanding properties like excellent flexibility, optical transparency, high electrical conductivity, extremely small weight, and low processing costs. Optical and electrical properties of a CNT layer can be varied with changing, e.g., the diameter and length of nanotubes or the amount of carbon nanotubes in the layer. 'CNT layers can be used for fabrication of transparent electrodes, fuel and solar cells, supercapacitors, etc. Therefore, a measurement technique for the number of carbon nanotubes in the CNT layer is very useful,' says Irina Nefedova, one of the researchers in this project, who defended her thesis of electrical and optical properties of carbon nanotubes in March 2017 at Aalto University. Explore further: Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future More information: Ilya V. Anoshkin et al. Single walled carbon nanotube quantification method employing the Raman signal intensity, Carbon (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.carbon.2017.02.019


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.sciencemag.org

From the 80-kilogram Great Dane to the 1-kilogram tiny teacup poodle, there seems to be a dog for everyone. Now, the largest genetic analysis to date has figured out how those breeds came to be, which ones are really closely related, and what makes some dogs more susceptible to certain diseases. "They show that by using genetics, you can really show what was going on as [breeders] were making these breeds," says Elinor Karlsson, a computational biologist at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester who was not involved with the work. After dogs were initially domesticated—likely between 15,000 and 30,000 years ago—people picked the best hunters, house guards, and herding animals to be their best friends, depending on their needs. There were dogs for war and for cuddling, for fur and meat, and for being good companions. Today dogs come in 350 or so breeds, each with specific traits and behaviors. Many arose in the past 200 years. Some studies have defined the genetics of a relatively small number of breeds, but none has been comprehensive enough to show how and when most came into existence. "The whole period in between [domestication and today] has been a black box," Karlsson says. Elaine Ostrander and Heidi Parker, geneticists at the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, and their colleagues spent 20 years going to dog shows, writing dog fanciers, and getting help from all corners of the world to collect DNA samples; in some cases they used already collected data. They weren’t interested in determining how and when dogs were domesticated, but how all the breeds developed. Their sample now includes 1346 dogs representing 161 breeds, or not quite half of all kinds of dogs. By comparing the differences at 150,000 spots on each dog's genome, they built a family tree. "The scope of the analysis is very impressive, [a] tour-de-force on breed evolution," says evolutionary biologist Robert Wayne of the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved with the work. Almost all the breeds fell into 23 larger groupings called clades, the team details today in . Although genetically defined, the clades also tended to bring together dogs with similar traits: Thus boxers, bulldogs, and Boston terriers—all bred for strength—fall into one clade; whereas herders like sheepdogs, corgis, and collies fall into another; and hunters like retrievers, spaniels, and setters fall into a third. The grouping of different breeds that share particular jobs suggests that ancient breeders likely bred dogs for specific purposes, choosing to care for those that were best at guarding or herding. Then, in the past 200 years, people subdivided those larger groups into breeds. But the data also show how some breeds helped create others, as they share DNA with multiple clades. As one of the earliest small dogs, the pug, which hailed from China, was used in Europe from the 1500s onward to shrink other breeds. Thus, pug DNA is part of many other toy and small dog genomes, Parker explains. "This is very exciting!” says Peter Savolainen, an evolutionary geneticist at the Royal Institute of Technology in Solna, Sweden, who was not involved with the work. “It shows how attractive traits from one breed [have] been bred into new breeds." Having these clades will help veterinarians spot potential genetic problems, Parker says. For example, before vets couldn't really understand why a genetic disease called collie eye anomaly, which can distort different parts of the eye, and shows up in collies, border collies, and Australian shepherds, also occurs in Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers. But the genetic analysis shows that this retriever has either collie or Australian shepherd ancestors that may have passed on the defective gene. "Mixing has resulted in the sharing of specific genomic regions harboring mutations which cause disease in very different breeds," Wayne says. Wayne and Karlsson both stress that to provide more details, the researchers should work to compare whole genomes—the entire 2.5 billion bases. And as Savolainen points out, the work "is a very good first step into the origins of all dog breeds, but half of all breeds are still missing." Ostrander and Parker say they see this publication as a midpoint, not an endpoint. "We had reached a point where we could begin to do some of the things we wanted to do," Ostrander explains. "By no means are we done."


News Article | June 15, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

For nearly two decades researchers have sought a way to target an estrogen receptor in the hope they could improve breast cancer survival, but an article published in Nature Communications contends that the effort may never pan out. The reason? The target receptor does not actually appear to be where they believe it to be. The study questions whether reliance on insufficiently-validated antibodies has led science down a dead-end path since the discovery of estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) in the 1990s. Cecilia Williams, a researcher at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and the joint research center, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab), says the beta receptor's discovery changed our understanding of estrogen signaling. It also raised hopes for a new endocrine treatment to complement the success of estrogen-blocking drugs such as Tamoxifen. These therapies target estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1), which was the first and most important biomarker in breast cancer, and can predict which patients respond to anti-estrogen treatment. But about half of such breast cancer tumors do not respond to anti-estrogen therapies, or they develop resistance over time, Williams says. "It has been thought that ERS2 had an opposite effect to ERS1, and that the beta receptor should not be blocked, but instead activated in breast cancer. This would supposedly improve survival. "Clinical trials are ongoing in the world right now, which activate ERbeta in breast cancer patients -- efforts that our study suggests are based on inadequate data," she says. "While we cannot claim that this receptor is completely absent in breast tumors, we do challenge the data behind the notion that the receptor is there." The Sweden-based research team says their study invalidates all but one of the antibodies used to detect estrogen receptor beta. These 12 antibodies have instead been mistaking other proteins for ESR2, Williams says, and data generated with these antibodies cannot be trusted. The one remaining antibody that can successfully be used against the beta receptor, however, can find no trace of the receptor in cancerous or healthy breast tissue, the study states. Also estrogen research relating to multiple other tissues and diseases are impacted by this study. Many false leads over the years may be due to "insufficiently specific" antibodies in the field of immunohistochemistry (IHC), Williams says. The researchers validated the antibodies with a level of unprecedented rigor, she says. The team, which included researchers from Uppsala University and Karolinska Institute, used negative and positive controls and applied multiple antibody-based applications. They compared performance of different antibodies on 44 different human tissue types and further identified bound proteins through techniques such mass spectroscopy at a scale not before undertaken. They also searched large databases of gene expression, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, The Genotype-Tissue Expression, and the Human Protein Atlas, and pin-pointed a universal lack of estrogen receptor beta messenger RNA in breast tissue. "Our study contributes to improved reproducibility within research using biologics, or antibodies, and it clarifies earlier controversies within the field of estrogen and breast cancer, thus helping move the field forward. In the end, we hope our study will help save both research funding and research time," Williams says. Anna Asplund, a researcher with Uppsala University, says the work should bring attention to a timely topic. "Significant problems due to poor validation of antibodies have recently been brought to the headlines by major journals, including Nature. We hope that our study, together with other on-going antibody validation efforts, will lead to a better quality of antibodies and antibody-based research." In addition to the Swedish research universities, the research involved the Division of Pharmaceutical Industries, National Research Centre, in Dokki, Egypt; and the Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Texas, USA. The project was supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Marie Curie Actions via the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (VINNOVA), the Swedish Cancer Society, the Stockholm County Council, the Swedish Research Council, and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.


News Article | June 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 2017 -- People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate safely through the environment using echolocation. Bo Schenkman, an associate professor at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, will present a summary of some aspects of his work on human echolocation during Acoustics '17 Boston, the third joint meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the European Acoustics Association being held June 25-29, in Boston, Massachusetts. A better understanding of echolocation may improve methods for teaching the technique to people who have lost their sight later in life, and yield additional insights into human hearing. "Eventually I hope the research can give a result that can aid blind and visually impaired people," Schenkman said. Many individuals who were born blind or who lost their sight early in life are highly skilled at using echoes that bounce off objects, walls, hallways and buildings to find their way around. The majority of people use the tapping of their canes to echolocate -- the action calls less attention to themselves. But others add their own sounds like clicking, shushing or snapping noises to detect objects around them. In past research, Schenkman mostly used sound recordings to probe the ability of sighted and blind individuals to detect the source of echoes. By reanalyzing previously collected data using auditory models, he identified some of the specific informational cues that visually impaired people use to echolocate. The analysis shows that people use not only the pitch and loudness of echoes, which is well established, but that they may also use the timbre, especially the sharpness aspects of timbre. His work shows that, on average, visually impaired people are better than sighted individuals at perceiving the sound quality of two sounds that are close together in time. Blind people can also more easily counteract the "precedence effect," a phenomenon that occurs when sounds overlap, and a person judges the location of the sounds to be from the location of the first arriving sound, rather than from the ones that arrive later. Human echolocation shares some similarities with animal echolocation, though people use the skill to compensate for their sight, rather than as an additional sense. For both humans and bats, there is an ideal interval to emit sounds to most effectively echolocate. Humans, however, listen for the sound as well as its echo, while most bats seem to rely on just the echo. "It's a byproduct of our hearing system that we can use echolocation, so we're not as proficient at it as bats," Schenkman said. However, "I think one can learn much from differences between humans and bats, to compare how the systems work." Research into echolocation can inform Orientation and Mobility training, which helps people who are blind or visually impaired to navigate their environment. People who become blind early in life often learn to use their hearing, including echolocation, more efficiently. But for individuals who became impaired later in life, echolocation training can help them to move through the world with greater independence and safety. Session 1aAAa1, "Human echolocation in different situations and rooms" by Bo N. Schenkman, is at 10:40-11:0 a.m. EDT, Sunday, June 25, 2017 in Room 207 of the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center. Acoustics '17 Boston, the third joint meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the European Acoustics Association. The meeting is being held June 25-29, 2017 at the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts. In the coming weeks, ASA's World Wide Press Room will be updated with additional tips on dozens of newsworthy stories and with lay-language papers, which are 300-800 word summaries of presentations written by scientists for a general audience and accompanied by photos, audio, and video. You can visit the site during the meeting at: http://acoustics. . We will grant free registration to credentialed journalists and professional freelance journalists. If you are a reporter and would like to attend, contact Julia Majors (jmajors@aip.org) at AIP Media, 301-209-3090. For urgent requests, please contact media@aip.org who can also help with setting up interviews and obtaining images, sound clips, or background information. A press briefing featuring will be webcast live from the conference on Monday, June 26, 2017 in the afternoon and Tuesday, June 27, 2017 in the morning in room 111 of the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Register at https:/ to watch the live webcast. The schedule will be posted here as soon as it is available. The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) is the premier international scientific society in acoustics devoted to the science and technology of sound. Its 7,000 members worldwide represent a broad spectrum of the study of acoustics. ASA publications include The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (the world's leading journal on acoustics), Acoustics Today magazine, books, and standards on acoustics. The society also holds two major scientific meetings each year. For more information about ASA, visit our website at http://www. . The European Acoustics Association (EAA) is a non-profit entity established in 1992 that includes in its membership societies predominantly in European countries interested in to promote development and progress of acoustics in its different aspects, its technologies and applications. EAA gathers 33 societies of acoustics and serves public citizens and more than 9000 individual members all over Europe with yearly events as well as scientific conferences and publications such as Acta Acustica united with Acustica and Acoustics in Practice. The European Acoustics Association (EAA) is an Affiliate Member of the International Commission for Acoustics (ICA) and of Initiative of Science in Europe ISE. Visit our website at https:/ .


News Article | June 15, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Organs-on-Chips (Organ Chips) are emerging as powerful tools that allow researchers to study the physiology of human organs and tissues in ways not possible before. By mimicking normal blood flow, the mechanical microenvironment, and how different tissues physically interface with one another in living organs, they offer a more systematic approach to testing drugs than other in vitro methods that ultimately could help to replace animal testing. As it can take weeks to grow human cells into intact differentiated and functional tissues within Organ Chips, such as those that mimic the lung and intestine, and researchers seek to understand how drugs, toxins or other perturbations alter tissue structure and function, the team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering led by Donald Ingber has been searching for ways to non-invasively monitor the health and maturity of cells cultured within these microfluidic devices over extended times. It has been particularly difficult to measure changes in electrical functions of cells grown within Organ Chips that are normally electrically active, such as neuronal cells in the brain or beating heart cells, both during their differentiation and in response to drugs. Now, Ingber's team has collaborated with Wyss Core Faculty member Kit Parker and his group to bring solutions to these problems by fitting Organ Chips with embedded electrodes that enable accurate and continuous monitoring of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a broadly used measure of tissue health and differentiation, and real-time assessment of electrical activity of living cells, as demonstrated in a Heart Chip model. Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., is the Wyss Institute's Founding Director and also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at HMS and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). And Parker is also the Tarr Family Professor of Bioengineering and Applied Physics at SEAS. "These electrically active Organ Chips help to open a window into how living human cells and tissues function within an organ context, without having to enter the human body or even remove the cells from our chips," said Ingber. "We can now start to study how different tissue barriers are wounded in real time by infection, radiation, drug exposure or even malnutrition, and how and when they heal in response to new regenerative therapeutics." The TEER measurement is used to quantify the flow of ions between electrodes and across the tissue-tissue interface made of an organ-specific epithelium and endothelium that is a core component of many of the Institute's human Organ Chips. Epithelial cells form tissue layers that cover our skin and the inner surfaces of most of our internal organs, while endothelial cells line the adjacent blood-transporting vessels and capillaries that support their functions. Both of these cell layers act as a barrier to small molecules and ions that protects the organs and enables specialized functions, such as absorption in the intestine or urine secretion in the kidney. Conversely, drug toxicities, infections, inflammation and other injurious stimuli can disrupt these barriers. TEER measurements, that are based on restriction of ion passage or electrical resistance, can thus be used to assess both the baseline functional integrity of these cell layers and damage responses that are triggered by drugs or other toxic agents. "Using a new layer-by-layer fabrication process, we created a microfluidic environment in which TEER-measuring electrodes are integral components of the chip architecture and are positioned as close as possible to the tissues grown in one or both of two parallel running channels," said Olivier Henry, Ph.D., a Wyss Institute Staff Engineer who was the driving force behind the new Organ Chip designs. "In contrast to past electrode designs, this fixed geometry allows accurate measurements that are fully comparable within and between experiments, and that tell us exactly how tissues like that of lung or gut mature within a channel, keep in shape and break down under the influence of drugs or other manipulations." The Wyss team's TEER-measuring Organ Chip design is published in Lab on a Chip. Other authors in addition to Ingber and Henry were Remi Villenave, Ph.D., a Postdoctoral Fellow working with Ingber at the time of the study, and Wyss Researchers Michael Cronce, William Leineweber and Maximilian Benz. In a second study also reported in Lab on a Chip, the Ingber-Henry team collaborated with Kit Parker who has a strong research interest cardiac biology. Working together, this Wyss interdisciplinary team further enhanced the functionality of the TEER chips by integrating Multi-Electrode-Arrays (MEAs) in the chips that can measure the behavior of electrically active cells like beating heart muscle cells. Using the TEER-MEA chip, the researchers built a beating vascularized Heart Chip in which human cardiomyocytes are cultured in one microfluidic channel that is separated by a thin semi-permeable membrane from a second, parallel endothelium-lined vascular channel. To test the chip's new capabilities, the team treated the vascularized Heart Chip with a known inflammatory stimulant that specifically disrupts endothelial barriers or a heart stimulant that acts directly on cardiomyocytes. "This new chip enables us to perform live electrophysiological measurements to assess the integrity of the endothelial barrier in the heart using TEER measurements, while simultaneously quantifying the beating frequency of the heart cells using MEA. This allows us to reveal how drugs affect heart functions in a scenario where the two cell populations are closely coupled," said Ben Maoz, Ph.D., a co-first author on the second study, who also is a Technology Development Fellow at the Wyss Institute and a member of Parker's group. Maoz shared the first-authorship with Henry and Anna Herland, Ph.D., who worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow on Ingber's team, and is now Assistant Professor at the Royal Institute of Technology and the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. "The future of Organs-on-Chips is instrumented chips: the idea that the experimenter is taken out of the loop during data collection. Continuous data collection off of organ mimics is what we need to measure efficacy and safety of drugs during long-duration experiments. These kinds of technologies offer us a granularity we have not had before," said Kit Parker.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Professor Julia Hirschberg has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), one of the highest professional distinctions awarded to an engineer. Hirschberg was cited by the NAE for her "contributions to the use of prosody in text-to-speech and spoken dialogue systems, and to audio browsing and retrieval." Her research in speech analysis uses machine learning to help experts identify deceptive speech, and even to assess sentiment and emotion across languages and cultures. "I am thrilled to be elected to such an eminent group of researchers," said Hirschberg, who is the Percy K. and Vida L.W. Hudson Professor of Computer Science and chair of the Computer Science Department, as well as a member of the Data Science Institute. "It is such a great honor." Hirschberg's main area of research is computational linguistics, with a focus on prosody, or the relationship between intonation and discourse. Her current projects include research into emotional and deceptive speech, spoken dialogue systems, entrainment in dialogue, speech synthesis, text-to-speech synthesis in low-resource languages, and hedging behaviors. "I was very pleased to learn of Julia's election for her pioneering work at the intersection of linguistics and computer science," Mary C. Boyce, Dean of Engineering and Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Professor, said. "She works in an area that is central to the way we communicate, understand, and analyze our world today and is uncovering new paths that make us safer and better connected. As chair of Computer Science, she has also led the department through a period of tremendous growth and exciting changes." Hirschberg, who joined Columbia Engineering in 2002 as a professor in the Department of Computer Science and has served as department chair since 2012, earned her PhD in computer and information science from the University of Pennsylvania. She worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories, where in the 1980s and 1990s she pioneered techniques in text analysis for prosody assignment in text-to-speech synthesis, developing corpus-based statistical models that incorporate syntactic and discourse information, models that are in general use today. Hirschberg serves on numerous technical boards and editorial committees, including the IEEE Speech and Language Processing Technical Committee and the board of the Computing Research Association's Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRA-W). Previously she served as editor-in-chief of Computational Linguistics and co-editor-in-chief of Speech Communication and was on the Executive Board of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL), the Executive Board of the North American ACL, the CRA Board of Directors, the AAAI Council, the Permanent Council of International Conference on Spoken Language Processing (ICSLP), and the board of the International Speech Communication Association (ISCA). She also is noted for her leadership in promoting diversity, both at AT&T Bell Laboratories and Columbia, and for broadening participation in computing. Among her many honors, Hirschberg is a fellow of the IEEE (2017), the Association for Computing Machinery (2016), the Association for Computational Linguistics (2011), the International Speech Communication Association (2008), and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (1994); and she is a recipient of the IEEE James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Processing Award (2011) and the ISCA Medal for Scientific Achievement (2011). In 2007, she received an Honorary Doctorate from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, and in 2014 was elected to the American Philosophical Society. Hirschberg joins Dean Boyce and many other Columbia Engineering colleagues who are NAE members; most recently elected were Professors David Yao (Industrial Engineering and Operations Research) in 2015, Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic (Biomedical Engineering) in 2012, and Mihalis Yannakakis (Computer Science) in 2011. On February 8, the NAE announced 84 new members and 22 foreign members, bringing its total U.S. membership to 2,281 and foreign members to 249. NAE membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to engineering research, practice, or education, including significant contributions to the engineering literature, and to the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.

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