Royal Infirmary

Glasgow, United Kingdom

Royal Infirmary

Glasgow, United Kingdom

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News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Research led by University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust reveals 'transformative outcomes' for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia "We are proud to be part of this study. Our long term follow up of previously treated patients shows maintained efficacy without toxicity. This study is the first report of long term follow-up of selective BTK inhibitors in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia - and it is excellent news for patients." Scientists have described new results of a blood cancer study as 'outstanding' in tackling previously untreatable forms of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). The advance led by a team from the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, within the Hope Clinical Trials Facility, focused on treating patients with CLL. It follows on from a world-first clinical trial of a new drug to treat particular blood cancers. Results of that international clinical trial, led by Dr Harriet Walter and Professor Martin Dyer were published in the journal Blood in November 2015 and looked at the efficacy of a new inhibitor, ONO/GS-4059, in the treatment of CLL and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma patients, refractory or resistant to current chemotherapies. ONO/GS-4059 targets BTK, a protein essential for the survival and proliferation of the tumour cells. The study opened in January 2012 and 90 patients were enrolled in different centres in the UK and in France, with 28 coming from Leicester. Patients with CLL showed the best response and most of them were still on the study after 3 years, and remarkably without notable toxicities. In the new paper, the researchers are reporting for the long-term follow-up results. Their work, published in the journal Blood, was funded by the Ernest and Helen Scott Haematological Research Institute, ONO Pharmaceuticals, Gilead Pharmaceuticals and the Cancer Research UK Leicester Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre. Local charity Hope Against Cancer fund the Clinical Trials Facility based at the Leicester Royal Infirmary. Professor Martin Dyer is Professor of Haemato-Oncology in the Department of Cancer Studies at the University of Leicester and Honorary Consultant Physician in the Department of Haematology at Leicester Royal Infirmary. He said: "This current paper describes the long term follow up and shows that in patients with CLL the remissions are durable and associated with no new toxicities. Furthermore, in collaboration with Sistemas Genomicos, a company in Valencia, we have shown that mutations associated with aggressive disease respond well to treatment with ONO/GS-4059. "Our long term follow up shows maintained efficacy without toxicity. This study is the first report of long term follow-up of a selective BTK inhibitor - and it is excellent news for patients. "The results we are presenting are based on an international clinical study involving the UK, France, Japan and US - and led by Leicester. This was a Phase 1 clinical study which means the researchers are in the early stages of testing the drug's effectiveness. "We are now doing studies of ONO/GS-4059 in combination with other precision medicines to assess whether these results can be enhanced in patients with CLL and other B cell malignancies." Local cancer research charity, Hope Against Cancer, has been funding some of Professor Dyer's work. Chief Executive of the charity, Nigel Rose said: "Professor Dyer is a long-standing collaborator and recipient of Hope's funding. We are delighted that this is being put to such extremely important use in meeting our charity's mission of improving the lives of cancer patients locally."


BIRMINGHAM, United Kingdom--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Genesis Automation, a leading provider of healthcare value-chain solutions which improve patient safety, cut cost and eliminate waste for healthcare providers, today announced that Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust has selected the Genesis platform. Under the agreement, Genesis Automation will provide Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust with integrated supply chain management technology to increase traceability of medical supplies, resulting in significant cost reductions, effective device recall execution and increased visibility into procedure costs. Based in London, UK, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust is one of the largest Trusts in the UK, employing more than 9,000 staff and providing services to more than a million patients. The Trust runs three hospitals in London: Barnet Hospital, Chase Farm Hospital and Royal Free Hospital as well as clinics at Edgware Community Hospital and Hadley Wood Hospital. “Genesis Automation is the most comprehensive and easy to use, Trust-wide solution on the market,” said Natalie Forrest, newly appointed Chief Executive of Chase Farm Hospital. “It was important for us to select a supportive, flexible partner that understands the current and future landscape of the Trust and NHS.” Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust is the most recent Trust to select Genesis Automation. In recent months, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust and Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust have also joined the fast-growing list of healthcare providers that have selected Genesis to apply traceability principles and clinically integrate their supply chains. “By working with Genesis, we hope to gain valuable data and insights pertaining to our supply chain and inventory challenges that will help us to achieve cost efficiencies that will then fuel our longer-term initiatives,” said Tony Gaynor, Divisional Strategy Lead for Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen. “The fact that the system was built from the ground up for—and by—hospitals is a huge plus.” Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust was selected by NHS England as one of twelve Global Digital Exemplars to spearhead NHS’s Digital Revolution and is one of the busiest university teaching hospital trusts in North West England. “As a Trust, we are always looking at ways to increase efficiencies and do more with less. By implementing a system like Genesis Automation, we aim to enable significant savings, while implementing solid traceability in our operations and increasing patient safety,” said Lee Bond, Chief Financial Officer for the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust. The Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust operates in the city of Hull and the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. Comprised of two sites, Hull Royal Infirmary and Castle Hill Hospital, it provides acute care for a local population of 600,000 and over 1.2 million people for tertiary services. Genesis Automation is a leading provider of innovative supplies management, traceability and analytics solutions featuring clinically-integrated technology that redefines what supply chain means for value-based healthcare. Genesis provides hospitals and healthcare providers with affordable, innovative solutions that improve patient safety, cut costs and eliminate waste. For more information, visit Genesis Automation at http://genesisautomation.healthcare.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Genesis Automation, a leading provider of healthcare value-chain solutions which improve patient safety, cut cost and eliminate waste for healthcare providers, today announced that Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust has selected the Genesis platform. Under the agreement, Genesis Automation will provide Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust with integrated supply chain management technology to increase traceability of medical supplies, resulting in significant cost reductions, effective device recall execution and increased visibility into procedure costs. Based in London, UK, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust is one of the largest Trusts in the UK, employing more than 9,000 staff and providing services to more than a million patients. The Trust runs three hospitals in London: Barnet Hospital, Chase Farm Hospital and Royal Free Hospital as well as clinics at Edgware Community Hospital and Hadley Wood Hospital. "Genesis Automation is the most comprehensive and easy to use, Trust-wide solution on the market,” said Natalie Forrest, newly appointed Chief Executive of Chase Farm Hospital. “It was important for us to select a supportive, flexible partner that understands the current and future landscape of the Trust and NHS.” Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust is the most recent Trust to select Genesis Automation. In recent months, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust and Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust have also joined the fast-growing list of healthcare providers that have selected Genesis to apply traceability principles and clinically integrate their supply chains. “By working with Genesis, we hope to gain valuable data and insights pertaining to our supply chain and inventory challenges that will help us to achieve cost efficiencies that will then fuel our longer-term initiatives,” said Tony Gaynor, Divisional Strategy Lead for Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen. “The fact that the system was built from the ground up for—and by—hospitals is a huge plus.” Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust was selected by NHS England as one of twelve Global Digital Exemplars to spearhead NHS’s Digital Revolution and is one of the busiest university teaching hospital trusts in North West England. "As a Trust, we are always looking at ways to increase efficiencies and do more with less. By implementing a system like Genesis Automation, we aim to enable significant savings, while implementing solid traceability in our operations and increasing patient safety,” said Lee Bond, Chief Financial Officer for the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust. The Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust operates in the city of Hull and the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. Comprised of two sites, Hull Royal Infirmary and Castle Hill Hospital, it provides acute care for a local population of 600,000 and over 1.2 million people for tertiary services. About Genesis Automation Genesis Automation is a leading provider of innovative supplies management, traceability and analytics solutions featuring clinically-integrated technology that redefines what supply chain means for value-based healthcare. Genesis provides hospitals and healthcare providers with affordable, innovative solutions that improve patient safety, cut costs and eliminate waste. For more information, visit Genesis Automation at http://genesisautomation.healthcare.


Year 2011 sees the publication of US guidelines that recommend expanding indications for carotid artery stenting into "average-risk" patients, whereas guidelines from Australia/New Zealand largely do not. This article reviews the status of invasive treatment of carotid disease and highlights 2 controversial issues that were not really addressed in these guidelines: (1) a lack of emphasis on the importance of intervening rapidly after transient ischemic attack/minor stroke; and (2) why continue to recommend that only "highly selected" asymptomatic patients should undergo intervention when virtually no-one pays any attention? Copyright © 2011 American Heart Association. All rights reserved.


Gennery A.R.,Royal Infirmary
Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences | Year: 2012

Chromosome 22q11 deletion is the most common chromosomal deletion syndrome and is found in the majority of patients with DiGeorge syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. Patients with CHARGE syndrome may share similar features. Cardiac malformations, speech delay, and immunodeficiency are the most common manifestations. The immunological phenotype may vary widely between patients. Severe T lymphocyte immunodeficiency is rare-thymic transplantation offers a new approach to treatment, as well as insights into thymic physiology and central tolerance. Combined partial immunodeficiency is more common, leading to recurrent sinopulmonary infection in early childhood. Autoimmunity is an increasingly recognized complication. New insights into pathophysiology are reviewed. © 2011 Springer Basel AG.


McMillan D.C.,Royal Infirmary
Cancer Treatment Reviews | Year: 2013

Since the initial work, a decade ago that the combination of C-reactive protein and albumin, the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), had independent prognostic value in patients with cancer, there have been more than 60 studies (>30,000 patients) that have examined and validated the use of the GPS or the modified GPS (mGPS) in a variety of cancer scenarios. The present review provides a concise overview of these studies and comments on the current and future clinical utility of this simple objective systemic inflammation-based score. The GPS/mGPS had independent prognostic value in (a) unselected cohorts (4 studies, >19,400 patients) (b) operable disease (28 studies, >8,000 patients) (c) chemo/radiotherapy (11 studies, >1500 patients) (d) inoperable disease (11 studies, >2,000 patients). Association studies (15 studies, >2,000 patients) pointed to an increased GPS/mGPS being associated with increased weight and muscle loss, poor performance status, increased comorbidity, increased pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokines and complications on treatment. These studies have originated from 13 different countries, in particular the UK and Japan. A chronic systemic inflammatory response, as evidenced by the GPS/mGPS, is clearly implicated in the prognosis of patients with cancer in a variety of clinical scenarios. The GPS/mGPS is the most extensively validated of the systemic inflammation-based prognostic scores and therefore may be used in the routine clinical assessment of patients with cancer. It not only identifies patients at risk but also provides a well defined therapeutic target for future clinical trials. It remains to be determined whether the GPS has prognostic value in other disease states. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Johnson R.W.,Royal Infirmary | Rice A.S.C.,Imperial College London
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2014

A 73-year-old woman presents with persistent pain and itching in the right T10 dermatome from just above the thoracolumbar junction to the umbilicus since a documented episode of herpes zoster in the same region 1 year earlier. She describes a severe, continuous "burning" pain, unpredictable paroxysms of lancinating pain lasting a few seconds, and intense hypersensitivity to light tactile stimulation, such as clothing brushing against the skin. On physical examination, there are signs of cutaneous scarring throughout the right T10 dermatome, with areas of excoriation caused by scratching. She has patchy loss of tactile perception in this distribution as well as areas of pain provoked by a light brush. Acetaminophen did not help her pain. How would you manage this patient's condition?. © 2014 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Naylor A.R.,Royal Infirmary
Nature Reviews Cardiology | Year: 2012

Despite level I evidence, no worldwide consensus of opinion exists on how best to manage patients with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. In this article, I present the evidence supporting intervention in these patients, highlighting a number of 'inconvenient truths' that challenge the current 'one size fits all' approach to treatment. I will demonstrate that, even if one could identify and treat every individual with a 60ĝ€"99% asymptomatic stenosis, >95% of all strokes will still occur. Evidence shows that 94% of all carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting procedures in asymptomatic patients in the US are ultimately unnecessary, costing health-care providers US$2 billion annually. Evidence also exists that the risk of stroke in patients treated medically is lower than when the asymptomatic trials were recruiting, challenging the appropriateness of basing contemporary guidelines upon historical data. A small cohort of 'high-risk for stroke' patients will undoubtedly benefit from intervention and our goal must be to identify and treat these individuals, rather than continuing with a policy of mass intervention that benefits very few patients in the long term. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Adams J.E.,Royal Infirmary
Nature Reviews Endocrinology | Year: 2013

The diagnosis and management of osteoporosis have been improved by the development of new quantitative methods of skeletal assessment and by the availability of an increasing number of therapeutic options, respectively. A number of imaging methods exist and all have advantages and disadvantages. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most widely available and commonly utilized method for clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis and will remain so for the foreseeable future. The WHO 10-year fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX ®) will improve clinical use of DXA and the cost-effectiveness of therapeutic intervention. Improved reporting of radiographic features that suggest osteoporosis and the presence of vertebral fracture, which are powerful predictors of future fractures, could increase the frequency of appropriate DXA referrals. Quantitative CT remains predominantly a research tool, but has advantages over DXA-allowing measurement of volumetric density, separate measures of cortical and trabecular bone density, and evaluation of bone shape and size. High resolution imaging, using both CT and MRI, has been introduced to measure trabecular and cortical bone microstructure. Although these methods provide detailed insights into the effects of disease and therapies on bone, they are technically challenging and not widely available, so they are unlikely to be used in clinical practice. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 1.05M | Year: 2015

Healthcare is in need of more advanced therapies that integrate closely with the biological and physical systems of the human body. These include new treatments for age-related physical degradation, for example in the circulatory system, and post-operative functional restoration following surgery, including cancer removal, and trauma including traffic accidents. Unfortunately current medical treatments and devices rely heavily on conventional hard technologies that limit effectiveness and raise safety and cost issues. In contrast soft robotic technologies have the potential for close bio-integration by exploiting the soft-soft interfacing that is so prevalent in Nature. Soft robotics offers safer, scalable, lower cost and more effective personalised medical treatments. This fellowship will develop innovative modular soft robotic technologies for rapid exploitation in the next generation bio-integrative medical and therapeutic systems. To enable future soft robotic healthcare technologies requires a concerted effort across the development pipeline from fundamental biocompatible smart materials and their corresponding nonlinear viscoelastic mathematical modelling to efficient compliant mechanisms and complete compliant machines. Fundamental studies into materials and mechanisms will be undertaken and will feed into the identification and characterisation of a set of modular soft robotic components that act as building blocks for complete implantable medical devices. The technologies identified and developed will contribute directly to a step change in the sophistication of bio-integrative medical treatments. These will strengthen the UKs capability in the field of healthcare technologies and will make a significant contribution to improvements in standards of care and quality of life for a wide range of patients.

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