Royal Geographical Society with IBG

London, United Kingdom

Royal Geographical Society with IBG

London, United Kingdom
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Crane N.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Geographical Journal | Year: 2017

In his second address as President of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), Nicholas Crane illustrated the role geography can play in a shared, popular narrative. He argued that we should consider devoting more attention to promoting accessible geographical narratives with their long-term emphases on people, places and environment, and less attention to historical narratives with their emphases on documented events limited to the last couple of thousand years. The information, practices and views in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). © 2017 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers)


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 165.26K | Year: 2011

This project is a collaboration between the Department of Drama at the University of Exeter, the Department of Dance Studies at Roehampton University, and the founding members of The Southall Story organisation. It aims to research, document and disseminate the cultural history of Southall since 1979. This date is significant, as it was in this year that the range of communities within Southall came together to resist racism and violence which were threatening the town. The resultant uprisings led to the death of school-teacher Blair Peach, and in response to these events, a range of social, political and cultural organisations and festivals were created to unite the communities together in resistance and celebration. The Southall Monitoring Group, the Southall Black Sisters, and the Southall Youth Movement were founded, and alongside this, new forms of performing arts were created out of the coming together of artists from different communities and backgrounds, leading to innovative forms of performance and artistic expression. This connection between the arts and the social-political contexts is of great importance in the subsequent cultural history of the town, and its contribution to the wider cultural life of Britain, and beyond. Southall has often been seen as a model of a diaspora community, and has been of immense importance in the study of migration within Britain. This project aims to contribute a unique perspective on the town by looking across the art forms, to examine the ways in which they influence each other, which is a key factor of Asian performance aesthetics. Additionally, the performance forms will be studied in relation to their emergence from political and social events. Through a mixture of interviews and gathering of material, a vital oral and cultural history of the town will be created, which will be of benefit both to the local communities, and to the study of diasporas and migration within academia. The mixture of academics and practitioners on the research team will ensure a wide range of research and forms of outputs, which will have an extensive audience due to the forms of dissemination including a public symposium and exhibition, alongside a co-authored book, three conference papers, a website and a digital archive, leading to a documentation of the history which will be available for public access.\n


Crane N.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Geographical Journal | Year: 2016

In his first address as President of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), Nicholas Crane discussed how the themes of exploration, technology and education have influenced and inspired geographical thinking from the 1500s to the present day. The President also emphasised that geography – as a united discipline that reaches the wider population – makes, and can continue to make, important contributions to issues of global significance. © 2016 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers)


Palin M.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Geographical Journal | Year: 2011

In his address as President of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), Michael Palin highlights the centrality of geography and its study to many contemporary issues. His comments are followed by a summary of the proceedings of the RGS-IBG's 2011 Annual General Meeting. © 2011 The Author. The Geographical Journal © 2011 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).


Rees J.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Geographical Journal | Year: 2013

In her first address as President of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), Judith Rees highlights the potential role of geography in nexus thinking. Her comments are followed by a summary of the Society's 2013 Annual General Meeting, including reflections on 2012 activities. © 2013 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).


Rees J.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Geographical Journal | Year: 2014

In her second address as President of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Judith Rees identifies water security as one of the greatest contemporary policy challenges. Her comments are followed by a summary of the proceedings of the Society's 2014 Annual General Meeting, including reflections on 2013 activities. © 2014 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).


Jackson A.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Learning Disability Today | Year: 2012

For Gary Anderson, gaining independence, choice and his own surroundings has led to a dramatic shift in fortunes and lifestyle. Alex Jackson reports.


Palin M.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Geographical Journal | Year: 2012

In his third and final address as President of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), Michael Palin reflects on what led him to become President and what he has learnt through this experience. He emphasises his hope that all will feel welcome at the Society and be inspired by its work. His comments are followed by a summary of the proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) 2012 Annual General Meeting, including reflections on 2011 and the Society's next strategy, which builds on its work in policy, research and higher education, schools and outdoor learning, geography in the workplace, expeditions and informed travel, and engaging the public. © 2012 The Author. The Geographical Journa © 2012 Royal Geographical Society(with the Institute of British Geographers).


Rees J.,Royal Geographical Society with IBG
Geographical Journal | Year: 2015

In her third and final address as President of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), Dame Professor Judith Rees outlines the importance of geography in understanding some of the problems surrounding control of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the impacts of and adaptation to climate change. Her comments are followed by a summary of the proceedings of the Society's 2015 Annual General Meeting, including reflections on 2014 activities. © 2015 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 384.73K | Year: 2013

Michael Draytons Poly-Olbion, published in two parts in 1612 and 1622, is an epic of national description. Structured topographically, into thirty songs devoted to different counties or regions of England and Wales, the 15,000-line poem, a product of an era that had already produced Christopher Saxtons Atlas and William Camdens Britannia, includes an enormous range of historical and geographical material. There are extended passages, for instance, on the nations monarchs, saints and civil wars, as well as catalogues of birds, trees and flowers. In addition to the poem, the first eighteen songs are accompanied by prose illustrations, written by one of the greatest intellectual figures of the seventeenth century, John Selden. These quirky, digressive and deeply learned notes, totalling c.110 folio pages, demand attention in their own right. Finally, each song is preceded by a map, engraved by William Hole. While the poem made little impact at the Jacobean court, leaving Drayton frustrated in his quest for patronage, it has won a consistently wide readership over the four centuries since its publication. Yet Poly-Olbion has not been the subject of an independent scholarly edition, and the existing authoritative edition, published in 1933 as one volume of Draytons Works, is at once dated and slight in its textual apparatus and annotation. The poem has therefore enjoyed nothing like the editorial attention that has been committed to many of Draytons contemporaries. Given its own level of scholarship and detail, appreciation of the poem has doubtless suffered as a result. This project aims to use a new edition as a vehicle to resituate the poem within our national and regional cultures. The projects foundation is the scholarly work required to produce that new edition. This work is not especially complex in textual terms, since Drayton left us with a reliable printed source; however, it is more complex given the aim to annotate the texts of both Drayton and Selden to an appropriate level, in light of the importance of their works and the expectations of Oxford University Press. The project aims further to generate scholarly work on Poly-Olbion, culminating in a conference and a published volume of essays. While a scholarly edition and critical publications may reasonably be expected to command attention among an academic readership, the project also aims to reach a wider audience. It posits that Poly-Olbion, with its wealth of detail, is potentially an accessible and engaging text to any inhabitant of the United Kingdom. The project website will include an open-access version of the text, with a linked index of places and connections to googlemaps. Moreover, the project team will work in collaboration with Flash of Splendour Arts (FSA), a not-for-profit creative arts organisation that works with music, poetry and the visual arts to effect societal change, particularly within the field of heritage education. FSA will be contracted to present workshops involving children with special educational needs, using innovative methodologies to introduce, explore and reinterpret Poly-Olbion. The directors of FSA will also collaborate with the project team on a linked public exhibition and academic conference at the Royal Geographical Society. The proposed PI and CI are Renaissance literary scholars with established reputations in the field of Drayton studies. The proposed ARF 1, who would be responsible for producing much of the textual annotation of Draytons poem, is a PhD student due to be examined in September 2012, who supported the PI and CI on a pilot project that produced an online edition of the poems first song. The proposed ARF2, who would be responsible for annotation of Seldens text, is a Warburg-trained intellectual historian who has been identified on the basis of his relevant skills and expertise.

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Loading Royal Geographical Society with IBG collaborators