Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria

Melbourne, Australia

Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria

Melbourne, Australia
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May T.W.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Taxon | Year: 2017

Six lists of names from working groups set up under Art. 14.13 are approved, consisting of 3 names of families, 43 names of genera and 5 names of species, to be treated as conserved against the listed synonymous or homonymous names. Lists were compiled by working groups approved by the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi and the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi: on Cordyceps, Diaporthales, Dothideomycetes, Hypocreales, Leotiomycetes, and Trichoderma and Hypocrea. Issues around interpretation of Art. 14.13 and 56.3 and implementation of Art. 57.2 are discussed. © International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT) 2017.


May T.W.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Taxon | Year: 2017

Ratification of appointment of repositories by the International Mycological Congress is reported. The following two family names are recommended for conservation: Chrysotrichaceae against Pulverariaceae; and the teleomorph-typified Erysiphaceae against the anamorph-typified Oidiaceae. The following family name is not recommended for conservation: Dothioraceae against Saccotheciaceae. The following 10 generic names are recommended for conservation: the teleomorph-typified name Blumeria against the conserved anamorph-typified name Oidium; Catenaria Sorokīn (Fungi) against Catenaria Roussel (Algae); Chrysothrix, nom. cons., against an additional name, Alysphaeria; Flammula (Fr.: Fr.) P. Kumm. (Fungi) against Flammula (Webb ex Spach) Fourr. (Spermatophyta) with a conserved type; Fuscopannaria against Moelleropsis; Geastrum with a conserved type; Hebeloma with a conserved type; Polycaryum with that spelling; Pseudocyphellaria with a conserved type; and Talaromyces against Lasioderma. Conservation of Detonia Freng. (Algae) against Detonia Sacc. (Fungi) is not opposed. The following generic name is not recommended for conservation: Catillaria with a conserved type. The proposal to conserve the generic name Wickerhamomyces against Hansenula was withdrawn. The following 17 species names are recommended for conservation: Agaricus laterinus (Hebeloma laterinum) against the sanctioned A. fastibilis (H. fastibile); Agaricus tabescens against A. socialis; Alectoria fuscescens (Bryoria fuscescens) against Lichen chalybeiformis and A. subcana; Armillariella ostoyae (Armillaria ostoyae) against Agaricus obscurus, A. occultans, and Armillaria solidipes; Ganoderma camphoratum with a conserved type; Hebeloma fragilipes against Hebelomina domardiana (Hebeloma domardianum); Helminthosporium maydis Y. Nisik. & C. Miyake (Bipolaris maydis) against H. maydis Brond. and Ophiobolus heterostrophus; Lecidea oederi (Rhizocarpon oederi) against L. koenigii; Lichen fuscatus Schrad. (Acarospora fuscata) against L. fuscatus Lam. with a conserved type; Lichen leucomelos (Heterodermia leucomelos) with that spelling; Lichen muralis (Lecanora muralis, Protoparmeliopsis muralis) with a conserved type; Lichen vulgatus (Opegrapha vulgata) with a conserved type; Morchella semilibera against Phallus crassipes, P. gigas and P. undosus; Peziza ammophila Durieu & Lév. against P. ammophila Saut.; Polycaryum branchipodianum with that spelling; Stereocaulon pileatum with a conserved type; and Torula stilbospora with a conserved type. The following 22 species names (teleomorph-typified) are recommended for conservation against anamorph-typified names: Erysiphe arcuata against Oidium carpini; Erisyphe biocellata against Oidium erysiphoides; Erysiphe buhrii against Oidium dianthi; Erysiphe catalpae against Oidium bignoniae; Erysiphe celosiae against Oidium amaranthi; Erisyphe magnicellulata against O. drummondii; Erysiphe quercicola against Oidium anacardii; Erisyphe verbasci against Oidium balsamii; Golovinomyces sonchicola against Oidium sonchi-arvensis; Leveillula rutae against Oidium haplophylli; Microsphaera azaleae against O. ericinum; Microsphaera oehrensii against Oidium robustum; Phyllactinia alni against Ovulariopsis alni-formosanae; Phyllactinia ampelopsidis against Ovulariopsis ampelopsidis-heterophyllae; Phyllactinia chubutiana against Oidium insolitum; Phyllactinia dalbergiae against P. subspiralis; Phyllactinia gmelinae against Ovulariopsis gmelinae-arboreae; Phyllactinia populi against Ovulariopsis salicis-warburgii; Podosphaera solanacearum against Oidium saeforthiani; Sphaerotheca euphorbiae-hirtae against Oidium pedilanthi; Sphaerotheca filipendulae against Torula botryoides; and Sphaerotheca leucotricha against Oidium farinosum. The following two species names are not recommended for conservation: Cylindrocladium buxicola against C. pseudonaviculatum; and Verrucaria subcerasi (Arthopyrenia subcerasi) against A. subalbicans. It is recommended that the generic name Aspidelia and the species name Lichen quisquiliaris not be rejected under Art. 56. The following two species names are recommended for rejection under Art. 56: Botrytis farinosa (Peronospora farinosa) and Saccharomyces sphaericus. As a result of reference under Art. 53.5, it is recommended that the following two pairs of names are not to be treated as homonyms: Bertia De Not. and Bertya Planch.; and Otidea (Pers.) Bonord. and Otidia Sweet. © International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT) 2017.


May T.W.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Taxon | Year: 2016

The Special Subcommittee on Governance of the Code with Respect to Fungi was established at the XVIII International Botanical Congress (IBC) in Melbourne in 2011, with the mandate to consider what specialized procedures and by-laws may be desirable for dealing with changes to fungal nomenclature, and to report to the XIX IBC in Shenzhen in 2017. The Subcommittee conducted extensive discussions, summarized in this report. A majority view (80%) within the Subcommittee and a majority of mycologists polled at the International Mycological Congress (IMC) in Bangkok in 2014 support changes to governance of the Code encapsulated in two proposals published in this issue. These proposals cover election of the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi by an IMC and establishment of Fungal Nomenclature Sessions at IMCs to deal with proposals that relate solely to fungi, with procedures replicating those of the Nomenclature Sections of IBCs, excluding institutional votes. This report provides the supporting documentation for the two proposals. The report and the proposals should be read alongside each other. © International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT) 2016.


Brown A.J.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Muelleria | Year: 2015

Three South African Agrostis L. taxa are transferred to Lachnagrostis Trin., as L. eriantha (Hack.) A.J.Br., L. huttoniae (Hack.) A.J.Br. and L. polypogonoides (Stapf) A.J.Br. on the basis of high palea to lemma length ratios and a lack of a trichodium net pattern on the lemma epidermis. However, the lemmas of L. barbuligera var. barbuligera and A. barbuligera var. longipilosa Gooss. & Papendorf have a trichodium net and do not belong in Lachnagrostis. Instead, they are morphologically similar to a group of montane tropical African Agrostis, which includes A. kilimandscharica Mez. and A. mannii (Hook.f.) Stapf. Previous transfers of A. griquensis Stapf and A. viridis Gouan to Polypogon are confirmed as appropriate, as they lack a trichodium net but, unlike Agrostis and Lachnagrostis, their spikelets disarticulate below the glumes. © 2015 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria.


Walsh N.G.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Muelleria | Year: 2015

Taxonomic and legislative arguments are offered to justify the elevation of Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor (DC.) Paul G.Wilson to the rank of subspecies. © 2015 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria.


Brown A.J.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Muelleria | Year: 2015

Variation within Lachnagrostis adamsonii (Vickery) S.W.L.Jacobs is assessed and two new subspecies from the central region of the western Victorian Volcanic Plain are described: L. adamsonii subsp. ampla A.J.Br. from inundated, saline sites and L. adamsonii subsp. limosa A.J.Br. from slightly saline, moist lake beds and flats. © 2015 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria.


Walsh N.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Muelleria | Year: 2015

An existing name, Microseris walteri Gand., is resurrected for one of the most important food plants of aboriginal people of south-eastern Australia and for which the Koorie name 'Murnong' (or 'Myrnong') has long been applied (e.g. Gott 1983) in Victoria, and 'Garngeg' or 'Nyamin' in south-eastern New South Wales. It is compared with its two Australian congeners. A key to the identification of all three species and photographs of their root systems are provided. © 2015 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria.


Jeanes J.A.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Muelleria | Year: 2015

Podolepis omissa Jeanes, a new species endemic to north-eastern New South Wales and closely related to P. neglecta G.L.Davis, is described and illustrated. Its distribution, habitat and ecology are discussed. © 2015 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria.


Entwisle T.J.,Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2015

Since 1788, Australia has persisted with four European seasons that make no sense in much of the country. Australians may like them for historical or cultural reasons, or because they are they are (apparently) the same throughout the world, but they tell us nothing, and reflect less, of our natural environment. I argue for a rejection of these seasons and the adoption of a system that brings us more in tune with our plants and animals; a system to help us to notice and respond to climate change. I propose a 5- season model for southern Australia, starting with sprinter (August and September), the early Australian spring. That is when the bushland and our gardens burst into flower. It is also when that quintessential Australian plant, the wattle (Acacia), is in peak flowering across Australia. Next is sprummer (October and November), the changeable season, bringing a second wave of flowering. My proposed summer (December to March) is four months long, extending into March. Autumn (April and May) reflects the brief colouring of leaves on mostly exotic trees, but also peak fungal fruiting. Winter (June and July) is for that short burst of cold weather. I'm not the first to suggest an alternative way to divide up the year. Australia's Aboriginal communities have watched the world around them over tens of thousands of years, and come up with two to thirteen seasons to suit their local area. I'm also not the first recent immigrant to suggest we need a change. Any system covering such a large area will be a compromise, and I have based mine mostly on what plants do. Whether my new seasons are adopted or not, I hope they encourage people to take better notice the natural world around us and how it changes.


News Article | April 27, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Note: The following contains descriptions and images that may be considered NSFW. One Australian performance group is asking a provocative question: What better way to connect to the earth than through sex? Pony Express, a collective of four artists, will perform at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria in Melbourne, between May 6-16, at the Next Wave Festival. The show, entitled Ecosexual Bathhouse, is meant to be a "complete sensory environment" according to the group's fundraising page. Mainly, its intent is to get people to care about the planet in new ways, perhaps by relating to it sensually. SEE ALSO: The ultimate vegan sex kit is a kinder way to play According to Ecosexuality.org, where the movement appears to have originated online, an "eco-sexual" is defined as "someone who finds nature sensual, sexy." Some ecosexuals engage in sex acts with things in nature, according to blog posts from the website. When we spoke with Pony Express, the group said, "None of the performers or audiences are encouraged to have penetrative sex with nature or one another in the bathhouse. Ecosexual Bathhouse is an artwork — it is a playful and sensory environment. We encourage a safe space to get in touch with nature." The acts described are very BDSM meets the forest, but not in a Fifty Shades of Gray kind of way. There is no dominate or submissive partner. Rather, there are intimate acts but no penetrative sex involved. Ecosexual Bathhouse is more about sensuality and the senses. The actors touch and feel the earth and each other, and include nature in sex-like acts with one another. As seen in this promotional video, an actress sensually caresses a flower in the video, simulating a sexual act; another lovingly embraces a bathtub full of moss; performers in the photographs touch each other in the dirt while wearing greenery or flowers; there is a "Master" and "Mistress" of the Bathhouse, a "shapeshifting dominatrix." The entire experience will take about 45 minutes with stations ranging from a post-consumer sauna to a shape-shifting dominatrix lair. Visitors are invited to participate and observe as little or as much as they choose. Pony Express creators, West Australian theatre-maker Ian Sinclair and Californian visual artist Loren Kronemyer, described a spiritual, energy-based connection between human and Earth. "Sex is complex and very diverse; in our environment it happens around us all the time in ways we can barely perceive. The biggest human sexual organ is the brain, and Ecosexual Bathhouse encourages audiences to use their theirs in a fun, playful, and deeply serious way." The website includes advertisements for things like a "composting glory hole" or a "windplay zone," along with suggestive descriptions. (The glory hole is described as "so deep and dank, you’ll want to come over and over." Based on what the organizers said, it refers more to a spiritual orgasm than a physical one.) "The Eco-sex Manifesto," written by leaders of the movement Dr. Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, inspired the Pony Express creators.  Stephens and Sprinkle are credited within the ecosex community for popularizing the movement with their manifesto. They also outline the "5 Zones of Love" with the earth, detailing the different ways people can connect and interact with nature. These range from a mental and spiritual connection to legitimate physical acts.  On Stephens' and Sprinke's website there are explicit stories of things they have done in nature. Most of the stories told on the ecosex convergence website describe, similarly to the Pony Express performance, non-penetrative sex, but rather communing with nature.   When we spoke with New York-based sexuality educator Elizabeth Boskey, she hadn't heard of ecosexuality. However, she says, "That doesn't mean it doesn't exist."  There are several websites dedicated to this specific type of movement, groups of people exploring what ecosex can mean. It may be a recognized primarily through online communities at the moment, like many sexual movements (see: furries).  In the meantime, exhibits like Ecosexual Bathhouse are helping bring awareness to the identity and environmental sustainability at the same time. “Sex sells, so if we have an erotic motivation for the ongoing conservation of our environment, then perhaps the stakes would be high enough to encourage global action,” said Kronemyer in the Pony Express press release, “If we learn to the love the earth, maybe we can save it.”  Wrote the company in an email, "Our interest is in promoting a paradigm shift from Earth as mother to Earth as lover, because the earth doesn't have to love us unconditionally."

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