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Arealis G.,Royal Berkshire NHS Hospital | Nikolaou V.S.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Injury | Year: 2015

Bone defects can be congenital or acquired resulting from trauma, infection, neoplasm and failed arthroplasty. The osseous reconstruction of these defects is challenging. Unfortunately, none of the current techniques for the repair of bone defects has proven to be fully satisfactory. Bone tissue engineering (BTE) is the field of regenerative medicine (RM) that focuses on alternative treatment options for bone defects that will ideally address all the issues of the traditional techniques in treating large bone defects. However, current techniques of BTE is laborious and have their own shortcomings. More recently, 2D and 3D bone printing has been introduced to overcome most of the limitations of bone grafts and BTE. So far, results are extremely promising, setting new frontiers in the management of bone defects. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and Royal Berkshire NHS Hospital
Type: | Journal: Injury | Year: 2016

Bone defects can be congenital or acquired resulting from trauma, infection, neoplasm and failed arthroplasty. The osseous reconstruction of these defects is challenging. Unfortunately, none of the current techniques for the repair of bone defects has proven to be fully satisfactory. Bone tissue engineering (BTE) is the field of regenerative medicine (RM) that focuses on alternative treatment options for bone defects that will ideally address all the issues of the traditional techniques in treating large bone defects. However, current techniques of BTE is laborious and have their own shortcomings. More recently, 2D and 3D bone printing has been introduced to overcome most of the limitations of bone grafts and BTE. So far, results are extremely promising, setting new frontiers in the management of bone defects.


Puttick T.,Royal Berkshire NHS Hospital | Bahl R.,Royal Berkshire NHS Hospital | Mohamedbhai H.,Royal Berkshire NHS Hospital
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2015

An 80-year-old woman had the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran etexilate reversed using factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity (FEIBA) in order to facilitate emergency surgery for an incarcerated femoral hernia. She had atrial fibrillation was taking the anticoagulant for stroke prevention. That afternoon her international normalised ratio (INR) was 1.3 and activated partial thromboplastin time ratio (APPTr) was 2.17, having taken dabigatran that morning. 3000 units of FEIBA and 10 mg of vitamin K were administered and she was taken to theatre for emergency surgery. Surgery was successful, total blood loss was less than 100 mL and there were no complications. The following morning she had an INR of 1.1 and APPTr of 1.49. She made an uneventful postoperative recovery and was discharged home. There is a limited evidence base guiding practice in the clinical scenario described. The only controlled studies available are animal experiments. © 2015 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

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