Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU

Edmonton, Canada

Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU

Edmonton, Canada
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Follett T.,Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU | Calderon-Crossman S.,Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU | Clarke D.,Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU | Ergezinger M.,Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU | And 5 more authors.
Advances in Neonatal Care | Year: 2017

Background: A level 1 community hospital with a labor, delivery, recovery, and postpartum (LDRP) unit delivering over 2800 babies per year was operating without dedicated neonatal resuscitation and stabilization support. Purpose: With lack of funding and space to provide an onsite level 2 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a position was created to provide neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) coverage to support the LDRP unit. Method: The article describes the innovative solution of having an NNP team rotate from a regional neonatal intensive care program to a busy community LDRP unit. The presence of the NNP supported the development and integration of the advanced practice nursing role with interdisciplinary team members in both the LDRP and the emergency department. Results: The NNP was able to provide expertise, leadership, and mentorship for neonatal resuscitation and stabilization as well as education and consultation on neonatal care. In addition to the services provided by the NNP for infant's requiring acute care, the NNP provided transitional support for those infants who remained with their mothers in the LDRP unit. Furthermore, time required by the neonatal transport team to stabilize babies before transport to the NICU was decreased with NNP presence. Implications for Practice: The divergence from practice of the traditional NNP clinical role in the NICU setting to more of a consultant and nursing leader has proven to be a valued role at the community hospital. Implications for Research: A solid economic analysis of the cost-effectiveness of the NNP role in this community hospital is warranted. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Neonatal Nurses. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.


Amin H.J.,University of Calgary | Aziz K.,Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU | Halamek L.P.,Stanford University | Beran T.N.,University of Calgary
BMC Research Notes | Year: 2013

Background: Prompt initiation of appropriate neonatal resuscitation skills is critical for the neonate experiencing difficulty transitioning to extra-uterine life. The use of simulation training is considered to be an indispensable tool to address these challenges. Research has yet to examine the effectiveness of simulation and debriefing for preparation of trainers to train others on the use of simulation and debriefing for neonatal resuscitation. This study determines the degree to which experienced NRP instructors or instructor trainers perceived simulation in combination with debriefing to be effective in preparing them to teach simulation to other health care professionals. Methods. Participants' perceptions of knowledge, skills, and confidence gained following a neonatal resuscitation workshop (lectures; scenario development and enactment; video recording and playback; and debriefing) were determined using a pre-post test questionnaire design. Questionnaire scores were subjected to factor and reliability analyses as well as pre- and post-test comparisons. Results: A total of 17 participants completed 2 questionnaires. Principal component extraction of 18 items on the pre-test questionnaire resulted in 5 factors: teamwork, ability to run a simulation, skills for simulation, recognizing cues for simulation and ability to debrief. Both questionnaire scores showed good reliability (α: 0.83 - 0.97) and factorial validity. Pre- and post-test comparisons showed significant improvements in participants' perceptions of their ability to: conduct (as an instructor) a simulation (p <.05, η2.47); participate in a simulation (p <.05, η2.45); recognize cues (p <.05, η2.35); and debrief (p <.05, η2.41). Conclusions: Simulation training increased participants' perceptions of their knowledge, skills, and confidence to train others in neonatal resuscitation. © 2013 Amin et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Loading Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU collaborators
Loading Royal Alexandra Hospital NICU collaborators