The Royal Agricultural College

Cirencester, United Kingdom

The Royal Agricultural College

Cirencester, United Kingdom
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Ucci M.,University College London | Biddulph P.,University College London | Oreszczyn T.,University College London | Crowther D.,University of Cambridge | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Building Performance Simulation | Year: 2011

This article discusses the capabilities and the application of an innovative combined hygrothermal and population model to assess the impact of building design and occupant behaviour on house dust mite populations in a mattress. The combined model is the first of its kind able to predict the impact of hourly transient hygrothermal conditions within a 3-dimensional mattress on a population of 'wild' Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus mites. The modelling shows that the current drive for energy efficiency in buildings might lead to an increase in house dust mite infestations in UK dwellings. Further research is needed to accurately determine the size of these effects and to adequately evaluate any trade-offs between energy efficiency measures and health outcomes. © 2011 International Building Performance Simulation Association (IBPSA).


Fisher R.,The Royal Agricultural College
Journal of Rural Studies | Year: 2013

This paper explores the role of various social ties in building trust and providing opportunities for information acquisition and knowledge exchange (IAKE). Social capital is used as a vehicle to explore the relationships between farmers and their advisors using bovine tuberculosis (bTB), a major disease facing the English cattle industry, as a case study. Much research on social capital and IAKE has been conducted within the field of rural sociology, but very little relates specifically to bTB. Exploratory findings suggest that trust provides an essential catalyst enabling passive information to be transformed into usable knowledge. Levels of 'linking' social capital between farmers and the government were found to be low, engendered by high levels of distrust and a lack of confidence in the information provided. In comparison, high levels of 'bridging' social capital between farmers and vets were found, brought about by long-term, regular and consistent contact, associated with high levels of trust and knowledge transfer. 'Bonding' social capital was also important in encouraging knowledge exchange among farmers, although overly close ties were shown to potentially lead to the emergence of exclusive networks and, consequently, the development of distrust. The implications for bTB policy and further research are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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