Glassboro, NJ, United States
Glassboro, NJ, United States

Rowan University is a public university in Glassboro, New Jersey, USA with a satellite campus in Camden, New Jersey. The school was founded in 1923 as Glassboro Normal School on a twenty-five acre site donated by the town. The school became New Jersey State Teachers College at Glassboro in the 1930s, and Glassboro State College in 1958. Starting in the 1970s, it grew into a multi-purpose institution, adding programs in business, communications, and engineering.It was renamed Rowan College of New Jersey in 1992, after Henry Rowan and his wife Betty gave the school $100 million, at the time the largest gift to a public college. It became Rowan University on March 21, 1997, when it won approval for university status from the New Jersey Commission on Higher Education. In the fall of 2012, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University opened in Camden; it was the first public medical school in New Jersey not associated with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. It later acquired the School of Osteopathic Medicine on July 1, 2013 and became only the second university in the United States to offer both an M.D. and a D.O. program. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Rowan University | Date: 2016-09-08

A wireless ablation catheter assembly including an ablation catheter having a catheter body extending between a proximal end and a distal end with a magnetically-susceptible area defined along the catheter body between the proximal and distal ends. A magnetic field generator is configured to provide a magnetic field to the magnetically-susceptible area such that the magnetically-susceptible area dissipates heat. A method of ablation is also provided.


Patent
Rowan University | Date: 2016-09-28

A wearable electronic system including a base member having an upper surface and a lower surface with the lower surface having a skin-adhering adhesive thereon. At least one sensor is positioned on the upper surface and configured to sense pulse when the base member is adhered to a users skin. A controller is configured to receive pulse data from the at least one optical sensor and output information representative of a health condition of the user. The base member is manufactured of a flexible, biocompatible material.


Patent
Rowan University | Date: 2016-08-05

Disclosed herein is a dispenser for adhesive fabrics or tapes, such as bandages or other adhesive medical fabrics or correction tapes. The dispenser has a case in which a supply reel and a take-up reel are mounted. A belt having adhesive fabrics or tapes thereon extends from the supply reel through one or more openings to the exterior of the case, and thence to a take-up reel. The supply reel and the take-up reel are coupled so that the belt is wrapped around the take-up reel as it is unwound from the supply reel and advances to move an adhesive fabric or tape to the exterior of the case for dispensing. The dispenser may optionally have an activation device that allows a user to extend a portion of an adhesive fabric outside the dispenser and dispense and apply the adhesive fabric to a human skin with one hand.


Patent
Rowan University | Date: 2016-09-26

The present invention relates to a mutant CC3625 cysteine synthase. Bacteria containing such mutant cysteine synthase can be used for the precipitation of soluble lead.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 994.37K | Year: 2016

The Major Research Instrumentation award supports the development of a novel cost-efficient electron microscope capable of imaging the top-most layers of surfaces with high spatial resolution at the College of New Jersey. The scope of the project is to combine the fundamental concepts of scanning electron (SEM) and scanning probe microscopies (SPM) into a single instrument called Near Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (NFESEM). The use of low energy electrons NFESEM will have an impact over many areas including biological, medical, data storage, computing and renewable energy. The device will immediately provide an alternative, high resolution surface imaging device to researchers in both New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania. The results from this project will be incorporated in course curricula at The College of New Jersey. Undergraduate students involved in the project will be trained and acquire expertise in these techniques. The instrumentation will help underpin forthcoming technological developments especially in the area of ultra large scale integrated circuits and spintronics. Furthermore, the collaboration scheme which includes early career and well-established scientists and engineers will impact research on superconductivity, low energy electron spectroscopy, nano-device characterization, nanoparticle enabled drug delivery and more. Involvement of industrial partners will enhance the training and transfer of knowledge. The researchers will also use this as an opportunity to introduce underrepresented middle school and high school students from Trenton to basic microscopy and its applications.

NFESEM will provide a means of overcoming the limitations of conventional scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and opens the possibility to use lower primary beam energies (< 100 eV). In essence, NFESEM is an intermediate technique in which electrons are emitted from a needle tip via field electron emission, and then impinge on and interact with the sample. As a result, electrons are ejected from the sample surface and detected and an electron spin detector will be incorporated into the system for polarization analysis of ejected secondary electrons. The NFESEM coupled with a spin polarimetry will enable SEM with polarization analysis capable of nanometer magnetic imaging, in particular low dimensional magnetic systems. The microscope will be equipped with a cryogen-free electro-magnet that is constructed to magnetize the sample of interest with a magnetic field up to 3,000 Gauss. The design and the control unit added to the scanning probe microscope will allow for high speed imaging, which is essential to simulate the imaging capabilities of standard scanning electron microscopes. The unique operating mode of the microscope, coupled with the polarimeter, generates three characteristic signals: 1) field emission current; 2) variations in the backscattered and secondary electron signal; and 3) a three dimensional surface spin asymmetry. This ensemble will enable nanometric imaging of magnetic materials; in particular, low dimensional magnetic systems. The NFESEMPA will be the first of its kind, and the proposed research team will be able to determine the advantages and/or disadvantages of using lensless scanning electron microscopy, c.f. contemporary SEMPA. Accordingly, this project will present an alternative method to generate a fine electron beam for high resolution imaging of atomically smooth surfaces.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PFE\RED - Professional Formati | Award Amount: 1.92M | Year: 2016

Efforts to improve diversity in engineering have stagnated over the last 10-15 years, despite numerous programs and other activities that have been developed over that time. The lack of progress suggests that it is not enough to simply fix the pipeline. Rather, efforts are needed to change the way all stakeholders in engineering education think about diversity. This project will revolutionize the Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) Department at Rowan University to radically increase diversity and achieve high retention and graduation rates of all CEE students. An ambitious plan for curricular and extracurricular reform is being used to increase the representation of women and Underrepresented Minority (URM) students and historically underserved groups. These measures will be deployed using a multi-pronged approach that includes revising admission criteria to promote a more diverse student body; enhancing the perception and understanding of diversity and equality among students, faculty and administrators to improve the culture of inclusiveness; developing an Advocate and Allies Mentoring Program for first year and transfer students; transforming the existing engineering curriculum in the second and third year from a narrow sub-discipline based approach to a more inclusive system-based approach; and enriching aspirations for all students by providing role models from industry and academia. Through these efforts radical changes will be made in the structure of the program: increase the percentage of women and ethnic/racial minorities (visible URMs) in the department from 19.3 percent to above 50 percent in the 5 year duration of the grant, while at the same time also increasing the percentage of all historically underserved groups; redesign curriculum, teaching and learning, and department systems and processes to promote inclusiveness that benefits all students; improve retention of all students from 85 to 95 percent; improve 5-year graduation rates of all CEE students from the current level of 68 to 80 percent; and incentivize the faculty to be active partners in the transformation

This transformative research project will generate new knowledge about the experiences of URMs in engineering. The main research questions include: (1) What is the perceived human capital (acquiring knowledge or skills), sociocultural capital (developing interpersonal relationships and networks), and personal capital (intrinsic and extrinsic motivation) of URM engineering students? What are the similarities and differences in those perceptions across race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender and sexual orientation? (2) How do the students perceive their self-efficacy and professional identity in (civil) engineering? (3) What aspects of faculty development training are most effective in promoting adoption of inclusive teaching practices and learning environment and creating an inclusive culture? These research questions will be used to obtain a better understanding of the perceived barriers for URMs in the field of engineering and identify strategies for developing a model of inclusivity. Strategies encompass admission and retention of students, faculty attitudes and teaching, and curricular changes that will impact the way students think and function in the professional workplace. The vision also extends to the students professional growth with higher aspirations being cultivated by addressing and enhancing human, social, and cultural capital. The transformation will help the student internalize aspirations, develop self-efficacy and self-confidence that they belong in the field as leaders and advocates for inclusivity. The results from this project will be a transformation kit, which allows other engineering programs to make similar changes. This project will provide guidance on how to change the culture of engineering to one of inclusion, ultimately resulting in a more diverse engineering workforce prepared to address the challenges of the 21st century.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 451.50K | Year: 2016

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This Major Research Instrumentation award will be used for the acquisition of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for interdisciplinary research, education, and training at Rowan University, a nearby institution, Rutgers University-Camden, and other academic and industrial users in the southern New Jersey region. Rowan University, a primarily undergraduate institution serving 15,000 students, was re-designated as a comprehensive research university by the State of New Jersey in 2013. This new expanded role substantially broadens the mission to include cutting-edge research and to serve as an economic driving force for the region. This state-of-the-art SEM will have broad and significant impact on researchers from different backgrounds with diverse research interests. It will enhance current research projects in the areas of energy, nanotechnology, biomedical devices, and several other areas of materials research. An important secondary impact is that the SEM will facilitate inter- and intra-institutional research collaborations, allowing projects that would not have been practical otherwise. This award will enable the integration of materials science and health care through the development of biomedical monitors, bactericidal coatings, and therapies based on nanotechnology. In addition, the SEM will help grow graduate programs by allowing more comprehensive projects for graduate students to develop the expertise needed for the nations technical workforce. Undergraduate students will have access to the system through research projects and related courses, thereby preparing them for the workforce or graduate programs, not only at Rowan, but at institutions across the country. It is anticipated that the SEM will be used by many researchers including those from groups typically underrepresented in STEM areas. These researchers will mentor underrepresented students recruited through established university and college programs. All these young researchers will have the opportunities to participate in advanced research in the exciting growth and innovation directions to which the university has committed.

The requested SEM will bring nanoscale imaging, nanofabrication, material analysis, and biological imaging capabilities to the southern New Jersey region. As a universal tool widely used in engineering, sciences, and medicine, the SEM will have significant impact on a broad range of research areas including nanofluidics and nanoelectronics, tissue engineering, energy materials, biomedical materials and devices, and neurodegenerative disease research. This award will enable the integration of nanomaterials with novel device designs for sensors and electronics with enhanced performance. New organic and inorganic coatings will be created and studied for biomedical, electronic, and energy-related applications. Polymeric and natural biomaterials with unique micro/nano scale structures will be fabricated for tissue engineering and medical research. Furthermore, this award will help establish core research facilities supporting high-level materials and biomedical research, which have been identified as focused areas of growth by Rowan University. It will also help advance the statewide biomedical initiatives in New Jersey. In addition, this MRI project will allow Rowan researchers to establish high-performance imaging, fabrication, and analysis capabilities as a central feature for new research collaborations.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2016

This project addresses the need to cultivate engineers holistic and critical understanding of the global, economic, societal and environmental impacts of engineering solutions. In this project, algae provides the basis for a collection of inquiry-based educational activities that bring together science, engineering and humanities to foster an understanding of the broader context of engineering work. A series of cost-effective, multidisciplinary, adaptable and transferrable hands-on experiments will be developed to introduce engineering and science principles through algaes versatility as a renewable fuel source, tool for greenhouse gas mitigation, and its role in the treatment of wastewater. Additional synergistic activities will be incorporated through introduction of ethical, social, and environmental issues related to these problems and analysis of proposed solutions. The three main objectives of the project are: (1) to recruit and retain students in STEM degree programs, (2) to increase self-confidence and self-esteem of students from underrepresented groups in STEM fields, and (3) to develop educational methods that explore uses of algae to address global engineering challenges.

This project will generate new knowledge about the formation of engineering students conceptions of engineering work, the disciplines that inform practice, the populations impacted by engineering solutions, and the role of the engineer in a global and societal context. In addition, it will advance understanding about the role that educational inquiry activities can serve in the development of self-confidence and self-esteem towards STEM careers. By reimagining what it means to be an engineer, this project has the potential to build a generation of diverse individuals that see themselves as engineers and appreciate engineering for its ability to help humankind in addition to the technological solutions it can provide. Through extensive partnerships, this project will impact students at the K-12, community college and university levels of STEM education. A partnership with the Center for Aquatic Sciences at the Adventure Aquarium in Camden (NJ) will bring algae-based engineering education to the broader community through family-based science education and informal science education.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Materials Eng. & Processing | Award Amount: 297.53K | Year: 2016

Electrospinning is a versatile and economical nanotechnology used to fabricate polymer fibers with nanoscale diameters. Polymer nanofibers can be used to produce lightweight composite materials, nanoelectronics, efficient energy storage and conversion devices, highly responsive sensors, and biomedical devices where their small dimension enhances performance. Nanomaterials are theoretically expected to outperform conventional materials in categories such as mechanical strength, conductivity, and sensing. However, in practice, electrospun nanofibers are much weaker than larger conventional fibers even when adjusting for the size effect. This award supports fundamental research into a new manufacturing process that stretches pliable electrospun nanofibers during manufacture in the same way as the drawing process that is used in conventional fiber manufacturing and that is known to enhance the mechanical strength and functional properties of larger-scale fibers. The key advantage of the new method is that it can be implemented as an additional stage in the continuous electrospinning process and is amenable to full scale production. This work will support the advancement of innovative nanofiber materials for application in a wide variety of technologies and industries. Execution of this project will involve graduate and undergraduate researchers who will gain firsthand experience in nanotechnology. Underrepresented K-12 students will be exposed to the project through various outreach activities.

It has been hypothesized that the poor macromolecular alignment and mechanical properties observed in electrospun nanofibers is due to chain relaxation in the presence of residual solvent. Strategies to investigate and overcome this challenge have been limited by an overall lack of control over fiber organization and manipulation that preclude fundamental fiber processing techniques such as post-stretching. This work will utilize parallel automated tracks to simultaneously immobilize and stretch thousands of individual nanofibers. Nanofibers can be wet-stretched in the semi-solid state immediately upon collection before solvent has fully evaporated. A systematic investigation of processing parameters such as total elongation, rate of elongation, and solvent evaporation rate will be conducted for several different polymers, proteins and carbon materials to determine their relationship to final nanofiber molecular and functional properties. The influence of nanofiber diameter on the mechanisms of wet-stretching will offer new insights into unique nanoscale effects such as molecular confinement.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 299.93K | Year: 2016

Large amounts of data have become available across fields in science, industry, government, healthcare and pharmaceuticals. Big data analytics and technologies hold tremendous promise to boost economic productivity, enhance national security and improve the quality of life. Recognizing the acute need for big data technology, the aim of this proposal is to create a national model by developing multi-year curricular material that allows course content in separate classes to be naturally inter-connected. In collaboration with industry (Lockheed Martin Inc. and HP Enterprise), this project designs a series of laboratory experiments in big data analytics and technologies that become more complex from the freshmen to the senior year. The proposed approach will cut across artificial course boundaries and introduce fundamental, contemporary and multidisciplinary big data concepts through a series of problem-oriented laboratory experiments. Students will also gain a better knowledge of policy, ethical, and societal impact issues of big data.

The collaboration with Palmyra Cove Education Foundation will bring big data activities to K-12 and further evaluate the educational impact and increase related dissemination efforts. The activities run at Cove will excite K-12 students about engineering and enhance teacher expertise in mathematics, science and technology. Palmyra Cove will reach out to local underrepresented K-12 school districts targeting women and minorities. The Foundation will also organize a workshop for undergraduate students, university faculty and K-12 students and teachers on big data as applied to environmental engineering and the geosciences. The results will be disseminated through technical and educational conferences and journal articles.

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