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News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) today announces that Danica Wilson, MD has joined its Chicago healthcare provider team. She will be serving patients at AHF’s Hyde Park Healthcare Center at 1515 E. 52nd Place and its South Side location at 2600 S. Michigan Ave that also includes a Wellness Clinic for walk-in STD testing. Dr. Wilson is a graduate of Tennessee State University in Nashville, TN and received her medical degree from Ross University in Dominica, West Indies. She has served as a physician at Howard Brown Health Center in Chicago before joining Christian Community Health Center in 2014. Since 2015, Dr. Wilson has provided care at a private practice in Avondale. “I am so excited to join AHF and continue providing exceptional care to Chicago’s LGBT community and people living with HIV/AIDS,” said Dr. Wilson. “My goal is to help our patients achieve complete total wellness in their lives and empower them to stay in treatment and keep a positive attitude about their futures.” “As AHF continues to expand our operations in the U.S. and internationally, we are honored when we can have experienced and highly-regarded doctors like Dr. Wilson join our family to provide exceptional care to our patients,” said Donna Tempesta, vice president of AHF’s Northern Region. “Dr. Wilson’s appointment is also significant for AHF because it allows us to continue to leverage our local presence and expand our services to areas of greatest need in the Chicago area.” This month, AHF also announced its new partnership with CALOR, formerly a division of Anixter Center, to expand CALOR’s HIV/AIDS and STD services to the local Latino and Hispanic community. The organization has also partnered with the South Side Help Center since February 2015. According to the City of Chicago’s Department of Public Health 2015 HIV/STI Surveillance Report, the most recent report, while new HIV infection diagnoses are declining overall in Chicago, blacks and Latinos still have a higher new HIV infection rate than white residents. Also, since 2010, non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics have accounted for increasing proportions of gonorrhea infections and primary and secondary syphilis cases. For more information on AHF healthcare clinics, visit www.hivcare.org AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF), the largest global AIDS organization, currently provides medical care and/or services to over 678,000 individuals in 38 countries worldwide in the US, Africa, Latin America/Caribbean, the Asia/Pacific Region and Eastern Europe. To learn more about AHF, please visit our website: www.aidshealth.org, find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/aidshealth and follow us on Twitter: @aidshealthcare and Instagram: @aidshealthcare


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DeVry Education Group and DeVry University have agreed to settle litigation brought by the Federal Trade Commission regarding DeVry University’s use of employment statistics in former advertising. We have agreed to pay $49.4 million to be distributed at the sole discretion of the FTC; forgive $30.4 million of institutional loans issued before Sept. 30, 2015; and forgive outstanding DeVry University accounts receivable balances by $20.2 million for former students. DeVry Group expects to record a related pre-tax settlement charge in the range of $52 million to $55 million in the second quarter of fiscal year 2017 arising from the monetary terms of the settlement. In addition, DeVry Group agreed that its institutions marketing to U.S. consumers will maintain specific substantiation to support any future advertising regarding graduate outcomes and educational benefits, and will implement training and other agreed-upon compliance measures. We anticipate the settlement will be entered as an agreed order by the court. DeVry Group chose to settle this action after filing an answer denying all allegations of wrongdoing. Student services and access to federal student loans are not impacted by the settlement, and at no time has the academic quality of a DeVry University education been questioned. DeVry Group is pleased this matter is reaching resolution, particularly as its institutions implement recently announced Student Commitments and as we continue our focus on investments that directly support our students’ success. Since 1931 DeVry Education Group has empowered its students to achieve their educational and career goals. DeVry Education Group Inc. (NYSE: DV; member S&P MidCap 400 Index) is a leading global education provider and the parent organization of American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Becker Professional Education, Carrington College, Chamberlain College of Nursing, DeVry Education of Brazil, DeVry University and its Keller Graduate School of Management, Ross University School of Medicine and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. For more information, please visit www.devryeducationgroup.com. Certain statements contained in this press release, including those that affect the expectations or plans of DeVry University or DeVry Group, may constitute forward-looking statements subject to the Safe Harbor Provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements generally can be identified by phrases such as DeVry University, DeVry Group or their management “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “forecasts,” “foresees,” “intends,” “plans” or other words or phrases of similar import. Because these forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, there are important factors that could cause DeVry Group’s actual results to differ materially from those projected or implied by these forward-looking statements. Potential risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause results to differ are described more fully in Item 1A, "Risk Factors," in DeVry Group’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016 and Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. These forward-looking statements are based on information as of December 15, 2016, and DeVry Group assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements even if experience or future changes make it clear that any projected results expressed or implied therein will not be realized.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DeVry Education Group (NYSE:DV), a leading global education provider, today announced that its board of directors has approved its tenth share repurchase program, which allows DeVry Group to repurchase up to $300 million of its common stock through December 31, 2020. In conjunction with the new program, which replaces DeVry Group’s previously approved $100 million share repurchase authorization, the company will cease its bi-annual cash dividend payment. “The significant expansion of our share repurchase program reflects our improved financial performance and our board’s confidence in our strategic direction as well as our focus on delivering increased returns to our owners,” said Lisa Wardell, president and CEO of DeVry Education Group. “We remain committed to balancing our capital allocation efforts with the goal of enhancing academic quality, supporting our growth objectives and consistently delivering value to our shareholders.” The timing and amount of any repurchase will be determined by management and the board based on evaluation of market conditions and other factors. These repurchases may be made through the open market, including block purchases, in privately negotiated transactions, or otherwise. The repurchases will be funded through available cash balances and/or borrowings, and may be suspended or discontinued at any time. Since 1931 DeVry Education Group has empowered its students to achieve their educational and career goals. DeVry Education Group Inc. (NYSE: DV; member S&P MidCap 400 Index) is a leading global education provider and the parent organization of American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Becker Professional Education, Carrington College, Chamberlain College of Nursing, DeVry Education of Brazil, DeVry University and its Keller Graduate School of Management, Ross University School of Medicine and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. For more information, please visit www.devryeducationgroup.com. Certain statements contained in this release concerning DeVry Group's future performance, including those statements concerning DeVry Group's expectations or plans, may constitute forward-looking statements subject to the Safe Harbor Provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements generally can be identified by phrases such as DeVry Group or its management "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "foresees," "forecasts," "estimates" or other words or phrases of similar import. Actual results may differ materially from those projected or implied by these forward-looking statements. Potential risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause results to differ are described more fully in Item 1A, "Risk Factors," in DeVry Group's most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ending June 30, 2016 and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on August 25, 2016 and its most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ending December 31, 2016 and filed with the SEC on February 2, 2017.


Home > Press > Graphene oxide could make stronger dental fillings: Study reveals new filling material material that is not toxic to teeth Abstract: Graphene oxide could be used to make super strong dental fillings that don't corrode, according to a new study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces. Research suggests we chew around 800 times in an average meal; that's almost a million times a year. We put our teeth under huge strain, and often require fillings to repair them. Fillings are typically made of a mixture of metals, such as copper, mercury, silver and tin, or composites of powdered glass and ceramic. Typical metal fillings can corrode and composite fillings are not very strong; Graphene on the other hand is 200 times stronger than steel and doesn't corrode, making it a prime new candidate for dental fillings. In the study, researchers from Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, and the University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine in Romania, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Basseterre in the West Indies investigated whether different forms of graphene are toxic to teeth. "The idea of the project was to add graphene into dental materials, in order to increase their resistance to corrosion as well as to improve their mechanical properties," explained Dr. Stela Pruneanu, one of the authors of the study from the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies in Romania. "There is contradictory information regarding the cytotoxicity of graphene, so we first wanted to determine how toxic it is for teeth." Graphene comes in different forms, including graphene oxide, nitrogen-doped graphene and thermally reduced graphene oxide. The researchers tested how toxic these different types of graphene are in vitro for stem cells found in teeth. Thermally reduced graphene oxide was highly toxic, making it inappropriate as a dental filling material. Nitrogen-doped graphene caused membrane damage at high doses (20 and 40 micrograms per milliliter). However, it was shown to have antioxidant properties, so it could be useful if covered in a protective layer. Graphene oxide was least toxic to cells, making it an ideal candidate. "The results were very interesting and proved that graphene is appropriate for use in dental materials," said Dr. Gabriela Adriana Filip, one of the authors of the study and Associate Professor at Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca in Romania. "We believe that this research will bring new knowledge about the cytotoxic properties of graphene-based materials and their potential applications in dental materials." The next step for this research is for the team to make dental materials with graphene oxide and test how compatible they are with teeth, and how toxic they are to cells. The results are due to be published soon. The research was part of a project entitled "New nanocomposites based on biocompatible polymers and graphene for dental applications," funded by MEN-UEFISCDI, Romania. ### Article details "Cytotoxicity assessment of graphene-based nanomaterials on human dental follicle stem cells" by Diana Olteanu, Adriana Filip, Crina Socaci, Alexandru Radu Biris, Xenia Filip, Maria Coros, Marcela Corina Rosu, Florina Pogacean, Camelia Alb, Ioana Baldea, Pompei Bolfa and Stela Pruneanu (doi: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2015.10.023). The article appears in Colloids & Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, Volume 136 (December 2015), published by Elsevier. A copy of the paper is available to credentialed journalists upon request, contact Elsevier's Newsroom at or +31 20 4853564. About Elsevier Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 33,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group plc, a world-leading provider of information solutions for professional customers across industries. About Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces is an international journal devoted to fundamental and applied research on colloid and interfacial phenomena in relation to systems of biological origin, having particular relevance to the medical, pharmaceutical, biotechnological, food and cosmetic fields. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | December 3, 2015
Site: phys.org

Research suggests we chew around 800 times in an average meal; that's almost a million times a year. We put our teeth under huge strain, and often require fillings to repair them. Fillings are typically made of a mixture of metals, such as copper, mercury, silver and tin, or composites of powdered glass and ceramic. Typical metal fillings can corrode and composite fillings are not very strong; Graphene on the other hand is 200 times stronger than steel and doesn't corrode, making it a prime new candidate for dental fillings. In the study, researchers from Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, and the University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine in Romania, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Basseterre in the West Indies investigated whether different forms of graphene are toxic to teeth. "The idea of the project was to add graphene into dental materials, in order to increase their resistance to corrosion as well as to improve their mechanical properties," explained Dr. Stela Pruneanu, one of the authors of the study from the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies in Romania. "There is contradictory information regarding the cytotoxicity of graphene, so we first wanted to determine how toxic it is for teeth." Graphene comes in different forms, including graphene oxide, nitrogen-doped graphene and thermally reduced graphene oxide. The researchers tested how toxic these different types of graphene are in vitro for stem cells found in teeth. Thermally reduced graphene oxide was highly toxic, making it inappropriate as a dental filling material. Nitrogen-doped graphene caused membrane damage at high doses (20 and 40 micrograms per milliliter). However, it was shown to have antioxidant properties, so it could be useful if covered in a protective layer. Graphene oxide was least toxic to cells, making it an ideal candidate. "The results were very interesting and proved that graphene is appropriate for use in dental materials," said Dr. Gabriela Adriana Filip, one of the authors of the study and Associate Professor at Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca in Romania. "We believe that this research will bring new knowledge about the cytotoxic properties of graphene-based materials and their potential applications in dental materials." The next step for this research is for the team to make dental materials with graphene oxide and test how compatible they are with teeth, and how toxic they are to cells. The results are due to be published soon. Explore further: Graphene: A new tool for fighting cavities and gum disease? More information: Diana Olteanu et al. Cytotoxicity assessment of graphene-based nanomaterials on human dental follicle stem cells, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (2015). DOI: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2015.10.023


BASSETERRE, St. Kitts--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have signed a MOU to explore research collaborations and joint educational activities.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

BASSETERRE, St. Kitts--(BUSINESS WIRE)--#Vet--Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine has appointed Dr. Sean Callanan as dean. He has over 25 years of experience in research and veterinary education.


Herin D.V.,University of Texas Medical Branch | Bubar M.J.,University of Texas Medical Branch | Seitz P.K.,University of Texas Medical Branch | Thomas M.L.,University of Texas Medical Branch | And 5 more authors.
Frontiers in Psychiatry | Year: 2013

The dopamine mesocorticoaccumbens pathway which originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and projects to the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex is a circuit important in mediating the actions of psychostimulants.The function of this circuit is modulated by the actions of serotonin (5-HT) at 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) localized to the VTA. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that virally mediated overexpression of 5-HT2AR in the VTA would increase cocaine-evoked locomotor activity in the absence of alterations in basal locomotor activity. A plasmid containing the gene for the 5-HT2AR linked to a synthetic marker peptide (Flag) was created and the construct was packaged in an adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV-5-HT2AR-Flag). This viral vector (2 μl; 109-10 transducing units/ml) was unilaterally infused into the VTA of male rats, while control animals received an intra-VTA infusion of Ringer's solution.Virus-pretreated rats exhibited normal spontaneous locomotor activity measured in a modified open-field apparatus at 7, 14, and 21 days following infusion. After an injection of cocaine (15 mg/kg, ip), both horizontal hyperactivity and rearing were significantly enhanced in virus-treated rats (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed expression of Flag and overexpression of the 5-HT2AR protein. These data indicate that the vulnerability of adult male rats to hyperactivity induced by cocaine is enhanced following increased levels of expression of the 5-HT2AR in the VTA and suggest that the 5-HT2AR receptor in the VTA plays a role in regulation of responsiveness to cocaine. © 2013 Herin, Bubar, Seitz, Thomas, Hillman, Tarasenko, Wu and Cunningham.


Catalano S.,University of Calgary | Lejeune M.,University of Calgary | Liccioli S.,University of Calgary | Verocai G.G.,University of Calgary | And 6 more authors.
Emerging Infectious Diseases | Year: 2012

Echinococcus multilocularis is a zoonotic parasite in wild canids. We determined its frequency in urban coyotes (Canis latrans) in Alberta, Canada. We detected E. multilocularis in 23 of 91 coyotes in this region. This parasite is a public health concern throughout the Northern Hemisphere, partly because of increased urbanization of wild canids.


Deluca Jr. L.A.,University of Arizona | John A.S.,University of Arizona | Stolz U.,University of Arizona | Matheson L.,Ross University | And 2 more authors.
Academic Emergency Medicine | Year: 2013

Background Hirsch's h-index (h) attempts to measure the combined academic impact and productivity of a scientist by counting the number of publications by an author, ranked in descending order by number of citations, until the paper number equals the number of citations. This approach provides a natural number or index of the number of publications and the number of citations per publication. H was first described in physics and was demonstrated to be highly predictive of continued academic activity, including recognized measures of scientific excellence such as membership in the National Academy of Sciences and being a Nobel laureate. Citation rates, research environments, and years of experience all affect h, making any comparisons appropriate only for scientists working in the same field for a similar time period. The authors are unaware of any report describing the distribution of h among academic emergency physicians (AEPs). Objectives The objective was to describe the distribution of h for AEPs and to determine whether Hirsch's demonstration of the h-index as a predictor of continued scholarly activity among physicists would also apply to AEPs. Methods Academic EPs were identified from lists provided on allopathic U.S. emergency medicine (EM) residency program websites. "Harzing's Publish or Perish," a free program available on the Web that queries Google Scholar, was used to calculate h for each AEP. Agreement between raters was analyzed on a subset of 100 EPs. An analysis of the 20 EPs with the top h-indices was performed to characterize the entire body of their scholarly work, and their h-indices were calculated at 12 and 24 years into their careers. Results A total of 4,744 AEPs from 136 programs were evaluated. Nine programs did not publicly list the faculty at their institutions and were excluded. A linear weighted kappa was used to measure rater concordance, with agreement of 98.3% and κ = 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.861 to 0.957). The majority of AEPs had h-indices of zero or one (59%), 85% had h-indices less than six, 95% less than 13, and 99% less than 24. Ten percent of AEPs had h/(years in publication) of 0.5 or greater. For the top 20 EPs, the mean (± standard deviation [±SD]) h-index increased from 7.6 (±4.6) to 23.5 (±9.4) between years 12 and 24. The mean (±SD) increase in h-index was 15.8 (±7.6). Conclusions The h-index can be used to characterize the academic productivity of AEPs. An h/year of 0.5 or greater is characteristic of the most productive EPs and represents only 10% of all AEPs. The 12-year h-index of top-performing EPs was strongly related to their future academic productivity. The distribution of h among EPs may provide a means for individual investigators and academic leaders to evaluate performance and identify EPs with future success in EM research. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

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