Ross University

Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Ross University

Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis
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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DeVry Education Group (NYSE:DV), a leading global education provider, today reported academic, operational and financial results for its fiscal 2017 third quarter ended March 31, 2017. DeVry Group also reported enrollment results at its Carrington College, Chamberlain University, DeVry University/Keller Graduate School of Management and DeVry Education of Brazil. “ We remain focused on laying the groundwork to return to consistent revenue growth, while further improving operating efficiencies across our organization,” said Lisa Wardell, president and CEO of DeVry Education Group. “ We are committed to filling the global work force skills gaps that are prevalent in our society through our medical and healthcare, professional education and technology and business program offerings. I’m encouraged with the early traction of our new programs and remain confident that we are taking the right steps to strengthen our value proposition and enhance our growth potential.” Selected financial data for the three months ended March 31, 2017: The fiscal 2017 third quarter results contained pre-tax restructuring charges of $7.8 million primarily related to DeVry University, Carrington College and DeVry Group home office. In the quarter, DeVry Group realigned its reporting segments to reflect its current strategy. For the third quarter, segment revenue of $208.2 million decreased 1.0 percent compared to the prior year, with growth at Chamberlain University more than offset by decreased revenue at the medical and veterinary schools. Chamberlain revenue increased 2.4 percent to $124.9 million, while revenue for the medical and veterinary schools decreased 5.7 percent to $83.2 million. Third quarter operating income for the segment, excluding special items, was $50.8 million, representing a decrease of 11.5 percent from the prior year. Building on the strength of its brand and reputation, Chamberlain has broadened its reach in healthcare education through the establishment of Chamberlain University and the launch of a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program within its new College of Health Professions. The Master of Public Health degree program enhances Chamberlain’s continued focus on providing health and wellness education, improving healthcare policy through interdisciplinary collaboration and making health a shared value across communities. During the fiscal third quarter, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (Ross) was awarded a grant by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study mosquito-transmitted arboviruses such as chikungunya, dengue and Zika, which have emerged as global public health threats. Ross will study these viruses in an effort to advance the understanding of how they may be transmitted between animals and humans. Led by Ross, the research is a collaborative effort with investigators at Kansas State University and the University of Georgia. It is the first NIH grant awarded to a research team at Ross. Third quarter segment revenue increased 25.9 percent to $29.8 million compared to the prior year, driven by the Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (ACAMS) acquisition. Segment operating income for the third quarter was $2.6 million, down from $5.9 million from the prior year, driven by a decline in revenue in Becker’s CPA review program and ACAMS revenue seasonality. Becker has continued to focus on growing global revenue through its continuing education programs and through ACAMS. Third quarter segment revenue increased 28.6 percent to $61.8 million compared to the prior year. On a constant currency basis, revenue in the segment grew 5.3 percent driven in part by recent acquisitions. Segment operating income in the third quarter was $5.4 million, up from a loss of $1.6 million in the prior year. DeVry Education of Brazil (DVE) introduced several programs during the quarter such as a new architectural program at Ibmec and a Master’s of Education degree program at Damásio. DVE is focused on leveraging its curriculum and its brands to attract new students. DeVry Education of Brazil launched a new Ibmec campus in São Paulo during the third quarter, which is intended to expand the institution’s access to a broader student population in the primary economic center of the country. In the third quarter, segment revenue decreased 20.8 percent to $153.0 million. Revenue at DeVry University decreased 23.7 percent to $119.4 million during the third quarter, compared to the prior year. Third quarter revenue at Carrington declined 8.3 percent to $33.5 million compared to the prior year. The segment recorded breakeven operating income for the quarter, compared to $1.7 million in the prior year, excluding special items. DeVry University achieved $32.9 million of cost savings in the third quarter compared to prior year, excluding special items. Additional cost reductions are expected in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2017 to maintain positive segment economics. Fourth quarter revenue is expected to be down 3 to 4 percent versus the prior year. Fourth quarter operating costs before special items are expected to decrease 4 to 5 percent versus the prior year. For the full year, revenue is expected to be down 1 to 2 percent compared to the prior year and earnings before special items are expected to grow in the mid-teens range as compared to the prior year. Full year capital spending is expected to be in the $55-60 million range. The effective income tax rate for the fiscal year is expected to be in the range of 20 to 21 percent, before special items. DeVry Group will hold a conference call to discuss its fiscal 2017 third quarter financial results on May 4, 2017 at 4 p.m. Central (5 p.m. Eastern). The conference call will be led by Lisa Wardell, president and CEO, and Patrick Unzicker, CFO and treasurer. For those wishing to participate by telephone, dial 877-407-6184 (domestic) or 201-389-0877 (international). Ask for the “DeVry Education Group Call” or use conference ID: 13655813. DeVry Group will also broadcast the conference call on DeVry Group's website at: http://www.investorcalendar.com/IC/CEPage.asp?ID=175878. Please access the website at least 15 minutes prior to the start of the call to register, download and install any necessary audio software. DeVry Group will archive a telephone replay of the call until Friday, May 19, 2017. To access the replay, dial 877-660-6853 (domestic) or 201-612-7415 (international). To access the webcast replay, please visit DeVry Group's website, or: http://www.investorcalendar.com/IC/CEPage.asp?ID=175878. Since 1931 DeVry Education Group has empowered its students to achieve their educational and career goals. DeVry Education Group Inc. (NYSE: DV; member S&P MidCap 400 Index) is a leading global education provider and the parent organization of American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Becker Professional Education, Carrington College, Chamberlain University, DeVry Education of Brazil, DeVry University and its Keller Graduate School of Management, Ross University School of Medicine and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. For more information, please visit www.devryeducationgroup.com. Certain statements contained in this release concerning DeVry Group's future performance, including those statements concerning DeVry Group's expectations or plans, may constitute forward-looking statements subject to the Safe Harbor Provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements generally can be identified by phrases such as DeVry Group or its management "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "foresees," "forecasts," "estimates" or other words or phrases of similar import. Actual results may differ materially from those projected or implied by these forward-looking statements. Potential risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause results to differ are described more fully in Item 1A, "Risk Factors," in DeVry Group's most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ending June 30, 2016 and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on August 25, 2016 and its most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ending December 31, 2016 and filed with the SEC on February 2, 2017. During the third quarter and first nine months of fiscal year 2017, DeVry Group recorded special items related to the following: (i) Restructuring charges related to severance for workforce reductions and real estate consolidations at the medical and veterinary schools which is part of the Medical and Healthcare segment, DeVry University and Carrington College ("Carrington") which are part of the U.S. Traditional Postsecondary segment, and DeVry Group's home office (not related to any segment) in order to align its cost structure with enrollments; (ii) Charges related to regulatory settlement agreements; and (iii) A charge related to an asset fair value write-down of its Pomona, California campus. During the third quarter and first nine months of fiscal year 2016, DeVry Group recorded special items related to the following: (i) Restructuring charges related to workforce reductions and real estate consolidations at DeVry University and real estate consolidations at Carrington in order to align its cost structure with enrollments; (ii) An asset impairment charge related to the write-down of Carrington's intangible assets and goodwill; (iii) A charge related to an asset fair value write-down at Becker Professional Education which is part of the Professional Education segment; and (iv) A gain on the sale of the DeVry University, Fremont, California campus and student housing facilities. The following tables illustrate the effects of the special items on DeVry Group’s operating income and net income. Management believes that the non-GAAP disclosure of operating income and net income excluding these special items provides investors with useful supplemental information regarding the underlying business trends and performance of DeVry Group’s ongoing operations and is useful for period-over-period comparisons of such operations given the special nature of the restructuring charges, regulatory settlements, loss on assets held for sale, an asset impairment charge and gain on sale of assets. DeVry Group uses these supplemental financial measures internally in its management and budgeting process. However, these non-GAAP financial measures should be viewed in addition to, and not as a substitute for, DeVry Group’s reported results prepared in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ("GAAP"). The following tables reconcile these non-GAAP measures to the most directly comparable GAAP information (in thousands):


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

In 2009, veterinary ophthalmologist Ron Ofri took a call about a flock of sheep in northern Israel. Some of the lambs were day-blind: they wandered easily at night, but stood motionless when the Sun rose. Ofri, a researcher at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem who has a PhD and a doctorate in veterinary medicine (DVM), examined the sheep. Then he swapped his clinician's hat for his research one, assessing the sheep's retinal function and genome using techniques that he had learnt in graduate school. He and his colleagues then determined that some sheep carry a mutation in the same gene that causes human day-blindness. They successfully tested a gene therapy in sheep, and expect to soon launch human trials. The combination of a clinical and a research focus has been enormously beneficial, Ofri says. “One enriches the other.” Ofri is one of a small group of PhD scientists who have augmented their research training with a professional degree or a master's in another topic — public health, for example, or physical therapy (see 'Mix and match'). Data from the US National Science Foundation show that fewer than 1% of the 261,581 people who were awarded a PhD between 2011 and 2015 also earned a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree. Even fewer combined a PhD with a dental degree. Obtaining multiple advanced degrees can open career doors and position scientists to act as a bridge between two fields of expertise. A downside, however, is that they can take a long time to complete — seven years or more, in some cases. The degrees are usually done sequentially, but some programmes make it possible to do them concurrently. The costs vary: during a PhD, tuition and stipends are usually covered by an adviser's grant or other sources. But for professional degrees, students tend to pay their own way or have to apply for partial or full fellowships. Combination programmes can help to lower the costs, because they may fully or partially subsidize the clinical training. Furthermore, government schemes will often waive the repayment of loans for those who go on to perform clinical research. Whatever the route, people who successfully complete multiple advanced degrees tend to have clear goals for how they will apply the skills from each, and have the ability to rapidly switch back and forth between the two roles, as Ofri did in his sheep project. But it's not the right course for everyone, says Tim Church, chief medical officer at ACAP Health, a consultancy firm in Dallas, Texas, who has an MD and a PhD. Those mulling over this route, he says, should carefully consider their interest in research and whether the dual degree will lead to a better job. The degrees ended up being a great choice for him, but the cost may not be worth the sacrifices for everyone. For many, the clinical component comes first. In Europe, for example, people wanting to become dentists generally spend five or six years in training directly after finishing secondary school, says Paulo Melo, a PhD dentist at the University of Porto in Portugal and chair of the working group on education and professional qualifications at the Council of European Dentists. They can then train in a speciality such as oral surgery, or pursue a research master's or PhD. The number of people who go on to do the research component varies widely by nation and research field, he says. Liz Kay, founding dean of the Peninsula Dental School at Plymouth University, UK, has earned a clinical degree in dentistry, a Master of Public Health (MPH) and a PhD in clinical decision-making. Now, she runs a master's of business administration programme for health-care workers. She spends one day a week in the clinic and teaches, researches and writes. “I've always tried to wedge open all my options,” Kay says. In the United States, dentistry students typically cannot enrol for a clinical degree, such as a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS), until they have done an undergraduate degree. And some universities offer the professional degrees together with a PhD. Professors who train students in such dual-degree programmes say that there's a need for graduates who can change gear with ease. Michael Atchison, director of the veterinary–PhD programme at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in Philadelphia, says that his graduates are particularly desirable to pharmaceutical companies, which often struggle to find people who can adapt molecular and cellular data for use in an entire organism, he says. According to a 2013 report by the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS), about one-quarter of the veterinary surgeons in contract research organizations hold PhDs, and they work mostly in safety research. In animal-health companies, about one-third hold PhDs, and they work mainly in clinical research and development. According to a 2007 NAS questionnaire, 24 of 170, or 37%, of company job adverts for full-time vets sought candidates with a PhD and a veterinary degree. The NAS report estimated that an average of 83 North American vets enrolled in a PhD programme each year between 2007 and 2011. Further education is a popular option for vets in Europe. A 2015 survey by the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe found that 21% of veterinary-degree recipients earn a PhD or master's as well. The dual degree may be a requirement for some jobs. Daisuke Ito says that applicants for his job as a medical-science liaison at Bristol-Myers Squibb in Fukuoka, Japan, were required to have both a PhD and an MD or veterinary-medicine degree. Liaisons use their scientific expertise throughout the drug-development process, and maintain relationships between the company and academic physicians. In 2014, Emory School of Medicine partnered up with the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta to offer a combined PhD and doctor of physical therapy (DPT) scheme. They, too, expect that the graduates will fill a niche, not least because one-fifth of the US population has a disability, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “There's a growing recognition about the need for robust rehabilitation science and researchers,” says programme director Edelle Field-Fote. Hiring committees may feel that having a PhD shows that a candidate has proven their ability to complete a complex project, says veterinary microbiologist Patrick Butaye of Ross University in Basseterre, West Indies. Butaye earned his veterinary degree at the University of Ghent in Belgium, where the six-year programme includes both undergraduate and graduate course work. He then got a PhD from the university, and now holds an associate appointment there. The system is similar in South Korea, says Jong Hyuk Kim, a cancer researcher at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Kim wanted to know more about the diseases he'd been trained to treat during his six-year veterinary programme at Konkuk University in Seoul. So, in his final semester, he took some pathology courses that would count for credit in a PhD programme, and enrolled in that PhD course immediately after completing his veterinary degree. He estimates that about 10% of his classmates did so, too. Both Butaye and Kim note that their PhDs made it easier for them to find work abroad. Most countries allow people to work for two advanced degrees sequentially, but truly dual programmes seem to be concentrated in the United States. Yet even there, they are rare. About 120 US universities offer MD–PhD programmes, 15 have vet–PhD courses and around a dozen have PhD–DDS combinations. Dual programmes appeal most to students with a strong educational drive and clear goals. Osefame Ewaleifoh, for instance, was interested in combining tightly focused neurovirology questions with a wide view of public health. That brought him to the PhD–MPH programme at the Driskill Graduate Program in the Life Sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. In his PhD lab, he studies the brain's protections against viral invasion; in his public-health work, he's implementing education for refugees to improve long-term health outcomes. Of course, joint programmes can be costly. At the University of Buffalo in New York, Erik Hefti is the first student to embark on a combined PhD–doctor of pharmacy course. He took out loans for his pharmacy degree. Now doing the PhD component, he works nights in a hospital pharmacy so that he can pay off those loans before they accumulate too much interest. For those who pay their own way through a professional course, the addition of a PhD can help to cut down on the debt. Church says that he owed nearly US$300,000 — mostly from the MD — by the time he'd finished medical school, a PhD and an MPH course. But because he went on to perform clinical research, government programmes helped Church to pay it off within ten years. Even if a university doesn't offer a specific dual programme, students may be able to design their own, says Steven Anderson, associate director for the Driskill programme, which now allows PhD students to pursue an MPH or a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI), after a few students did so on their own. Eric Skaar was the first PhD student to do this. He was interested in molecular epidemiology, and hoped that the master's would position him for jobs investigating disease outbreaks. At first, the university wasn't eager to let him enrol in the MPH, which at the time was meant only for medical students. But by promising that it would enhance his PhD, not distract from it, he found faculty support. Skaar set rules with himself and his PhD adviser — that he'd be a research student until evening, when he attended his public-health classes. He aligned his two courses with a PhD dissertation on how the bacterium that causes gonorrhoea evades the immune system, and a public-health thesis on the epidemiology of the sexually transmitted infection. He never did become an outbreak investigator, but is now director of the division of molecular pathogenesis at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee. Thanks to the MPH, he can approach his work on hospital infections with an epidemiological background. Students who want to create an ad hoc joint degree should be prepared to hack through plenty of bureaucratic red tape, warns Anderson. Particularly if the degrees are administered by different schools within an institution, basic issues such as tuition and class registration can be tricky. In fact, he's not sure what form Driskill's MPH option will take in the future, because he's working out how to manage the tuition. The multiple-degree path is mentally tricky, too. Ofri notes that people in his clinic don't understand why he spends so much time in the lab, and his students wonder why he's always in the clinic. It's near-impossible to maintain a perfect 50–50 split, says Jaime Modiano, a graduate of the Penn vet–PhD course and now director of the Animal Cancer Care and Research Program at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and in St Paul. He decided to forego taking the veterinary board exam, opting for a research postdoc instead. Butaye made a similar decision: he researches antibiotic resistance in microbes. But he appreciates the veterinary degree for giving him the flexibility to work in multiple species. The balancing act is especially challenging for students during dual-degree programmes. “You have to be able to manage these two very different things you're doing at the same time,” says Modiano. In veterinary classes, he had to memorize and integrate masses of information, then apply it immediately to treat animals. In research, he had to find the information himself and integrate it to spur future discoveries. “People who are successful are highly adaptable,” he says.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Adtalem Global Education (NYSE: ATGE), a leading global education provider, announced today that it has changed its name from DeVry Education Group, giving the company a name that signifies its student-focused purpose, and providing a more flexible platform that supports its continued diversification across healthcare, professional education, and technology and business. Adtalem Global Education received overwhelming shareholder approval. “I am pleased to announce this next chapter in our history of serving our students,” said Lisa Wardell, president and CEO of Adtalem. “Our new name makes clear our purpose to empower students and our status as a global education provider, reflecting the seven institutions and professional education company that make up our organization, and their own unique brands and strong reputations.” The name, derived from Latin and meaning “to empower,” was chosen from more than 5,000 submissions by Adtalem colleagues from around the world. During the past year, Adtalem has continued to adapt to meet the academic and career needs of its students around the globe. DeVry University has developed its DeVry Tech Path to provide even greater and more distinct value to its students; American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine (AUC) partnered with Western Connecticut Health System to enable AUC students to complete global health electives in Asia, Africa, and Latin America; Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine announced a collaboration with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health to explore research and joint educational activities; Ross University School of Medicine is expanding its reach to students and faculty via its Center for Teaching and Learning; Carrington College is expanding in-demand programs that promote healthcare careers and launching critical supportive certifications like Phlebotomy; Becker Professional Education announced new initiatives to enhance its USMLE preparation course and continues to expand its reach with financial professionals globally via the growth of the Association of Certified Anti-Money Specialists (ACAMS); Adtalem Educacional do Brasil began offering online MBA programs nationally through its Damásio network; and Chamberlain College of Nursing recently established Chamberlain University and launched a Master of Public Health degree program within a new College of Health Professions. The purpose of Adtalem Global Education is to empower students to achieve their goals, find success, and make inspiring contributions to our global community. Adtalem Global Education Inc. (NYSE: ATGE; member S&P MidCap 400 Index) is a leading global education provider and the parent organization of Adtalem Educacional do Brasil, American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Becker Professional Education, Carrington College, Chamberlain University, DeVry University and its Keller Graduate School of Management, Ross University School of Medicine and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. For more information, please visit adtalem.com.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) today announces that Danica Wilson, MD has joined its Chicago healthcare provider team. She will be serving patients at AHF’s Hyde Park Healthcare Center at 1515 E. 52nd Place and its South Side location at 2600 S. Michigan Ave that also includes a Wellness Clinic for walk-in STD testing. Dr. Wilson is a graduate of Tennessee State University in Nashville, TN and received her medical degree from Ross University in Dominica, West Indies. She has served as a physician at Howard Brown Health Center in Chicago before joining Christian Community Health Center in 2014. Since 2015, Dr. Wilson has provided care at a private practice in Avondale. “I am so excited to join AHF and continue providing exceptional care to Chicago’s LGBT community and people living with HIV/AIDS,” said Dr. Wilson. “My goal is to help our patients achieve complete total wellness in their lives and empower them to stay in treatment and keep a positive attitude about their futures.” “As AHF continues to expand our operations in the U.S. and internationally, we are honored when we can have experienced and highly-regarded doctors like Dr. Wilson join our family to provide exceptional care to our patients,” said Donna Tempesta, vice president of AHF’s Northern Region. “Dr. Wilson’s appointment is also significant for AHF because it allows us to continue to leverage our local presence and expand our services to areas of greatest need in the Chicago area.” This month, AHF also announced its new partnership with CALOR, formerly a division of Anixter Center, to expand CALOR’s HIV/AIDS and STD services to the local Latino and Hispanic community. The organization has also partnered with the South Side Help Center since February 2015. According to the City of Chicago’s Department of Public Health 2015 HIV/STI Surveillance Report, the most recent report, while new HIV infection diagnoses are declining overall in Chicago, blacks and Latinos still have a higher new HIV infection rate than white residents. Also, since 2010, non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics have accounted for increasing proportions of gonorrhea infections and primary and secondary syphilis cases. For more information on AHF healthcare clinics, visit www.hivcare.org AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF), the largest global AIDS organization, currently provides medical care and/or services to over 678,000 individuals in 38 countries worldwide in the US, Africa, Latin America/Caribbean, the Asia/Pacific Region and Eastern Europe. To learn more about AHF, please visit our website: www.aidshealth.org, find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/aidshealth and follow us on Twitter: @aidshealthcare and Instagram: @aidshealthcare


News Article | December 3, 2015
Site: phys.org

Research suggests we chew around 800 times in an average meal; that's almost a million times a year. We put our teeth under huge strain, and often require fillings to repair them. Fillings are typically made of a mixture of metals, such as copper, mercury, silver and tin, or composites of powdered glass and ceramic. Typical metal fillings can corrode and composite fillings are not very strong; Graphene on the other hand is 200 times stronger than steel and doesn't corrode, making it a prime new candidate for dental fillings. In the study, researchers from Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, and the University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine in Romania, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Basseterre in the West Indies investigated whether different forms of graphene are toxic to teeth. "The idea of the project was to add graphene into dental materials, in order to increase their resistance to corrosion as well as to improve their mechanical properties," explained Dr. Stela Pruneanu, one of the authors of the study from the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies in Romania. "There is contradictory information regarding the cytotoxicity of graphene, so we first wanted to determine how toxic it is for teeth." Graphene comes in different forms, including graphene oxide, nitrogen-doped graphene and thermally reduced graphene oxide. The researchers tested how toxic these different types of graphene are in vitro for stem cells found in teeth. Thermally reduced graphene oxide was highly toxic, making it inappropriate as a dental filling material. Nitrogen-doped graphene caused membrane damage at high doses (20 and 40 micrograms per milliliter). However, it was shown to have antioxidant properties, so it could be useful if covered in a protective layer. Graphene oxide was least toxic to cells, making it an ideal candidate. "The results were very interesting and proved that graphene is appropriate for use in dental materials," said Dr. Gabriela Adriana Filip, one of the authors of the study and Associate Professor at Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca in Romania. "We believe that this research will bring new knowledge about the cytotoxic properties of graphene-based materials and their potential applications in dental materials." The next step for this research is for the team to make dental materials with graphene oxide and test how compatible they are with teeth, and how toxic they are to cells. The results are due to be published soon. Explore further: Graphene: A new tool for fighting cavities and gum disease? More information: Diana Olteanu et al. Cytotoxicity assessment of graphene-based nanomaterials on human dental follicle stem cells, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (2015). DOI: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2015.10.023


Home > Press > Graphene oxide could make stronger dental fillings: Study reveals new filling material material that is not toxic to teeth Abstract: Graphene oxide could be used to make super strong dental fillings that don't corrode, according to a new study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces. Research suggests we chew around 800 times in an average meal; that's almost a million times a year. We put our teeth under huge strain, and often require fillings to repair them. Fillings are typically made of a mixture of metals, such as copper, mercury, silver and tin, or composites of powdered glass and ceramic. Typical metal fillings can corrode and composite fillings are not very strong; Graphene on the other hand is 200 times stronger than steel and doesn't corrode, making it a prime new candidate for dental fillings. In the study, researchers from Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, and the University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine in Romania, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Basseterre in the West Indies investigated whether different forms of graphene are toxic to teeth. "The idea of the project was to add graphene into dental materials, in order to increase their resistance to corrosion as well as to improve their mechanical properties," explained Dr. Stela Pruneanu, one of the authors of the study from the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies in Romania. "There is contradictory information regarding the cytotoxicity of graphene, so we first wanted to determine how toxic it is for teeth." Graphene comes in different forms, including graphene oxide, nitrogen-doped graphene and thermally reduced graphene oxide. The researchers tested how toxic these different types of graphene are in vitro for stem cells found in teeth. Thermally reduced graphene oxide was highly toxic, making it inappropriate as a dental filling material. Nitrogen-doped graphene caused membrane damage at high doses (20 and 40 micrograms per milliliter). However, it was shown to have antioxidant properties, so it could be useful if covered in a protective layer. Graphene oxide was least toxic to cells, making it an ideal candidate. "The results were very interesting and proved that graphene is appropriate for use in dental materials," said Dr. Gabriela Adriana Filip, one of the authors of the study and Associate Professor at Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca in Romania. "We believe that this research will bring new knowledge about the cytotoxic properties of graphene-based materials and their potential applications in dental materials." The next step for this research is for the team to make dental materials with graphene oxide and test how compatible they are with teeth, and how toxic they are to cells. The results are due to be published soon. The research was part of a project entitled "New nanocomposites based on biocompatible polymers and graphene for dental applications," funded by MEN-UEFISCDI, Romania. ### Article details "Cytotoxicity assessment of graphene-based nanomaterials on human dental follicle stem cells" by Diana Olteanu, Adriana Filip, Crina Socaci, Alexandru Radu Biris, Xenia Filip, Maria Coros, Marcela Corina Rosu, Florina Pogacean, Camelia Alb, Ioana Baldea, Pompei Bolfa and Stela Pruneanu (doi: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2015.10.023). The article appears in Colloids & Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, Volume 136 (December 2015), published by Elsevier. A copy of the paper is available to credentialed journalists upon request, contact Elsevier's Newsroom at or +31 20 4853564. About Elsevier Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 33,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group plc, a world-leading provider of information solutions for professional customers across industries. About Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces is an international journal devoted to fundamental and applied research on colloid and interfacial phenomena in relation to systems of biological origin, having particular relevance to the medical, pharmaceutical, biotechnological, food and cosmetic fields. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

BASSETERRE, St. Kitts--(BUSINESS WIRE)--#Vet--Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine has appointed Dr. Sean Callanan as dean. He has over 25 years of experience in research and veterinary education.


BASSETERRE, St. Kitts--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have signed a MOU to explore research collaborations and joint educational activities.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DeVry Education Group (NYSE:DV), a leading global education provider, today announced that its board of directors has approved its tenth share repurchase program, which allows DeVry Group to repurchase up to $300 million of its common stock through December 31, 2020. In conjunction with the new program, which replaces DeVry Group’s previously approved $100 million share repurchase authorization, the company will cease its bi-annual cash dividend payment. “The significant expansion of our share repurchase program reflects our improved financial performance and our board’s confidence in our strategic direction as well as our focus on delivering increased returns to our owners,” said Lisa Wardell, president and CEO of DeVry Education Group. “We remain committed to balancing our capital allocation efforts with the goal of enhancing academic quality, supporting our growth objectives and consistently delivering value to our shareholders.” The timing and amount of any repurchase will be determined by management and the board based on evaluation of market conditions and other factors. These repurchases may be made through the open market, including block purchases, in privately negotiated transactions, or otherwise. The repurchases will be funded through available cash balances and/or borrowings, and may be suspended or discontinued at any time. Since 1931 DeVry Education Group has empowered its students to achieve their educational and career goals. DeVry Education Group Inc. (NYSE: DV; member S&P MidCap 400 Index) is a leading global education provider and the parent organization of American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Becker Professional Education, Carrington College, Chamberlain College of Nursing, DeVry Education of Brazil, DeVry University and its Keller Graduate School of Management, Ross University School of Medicine and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. For more information, please visit www.devryeducationgroup.com. Certain statements contained in this release concerning DeVry Group's future performance, including those statements concerning DeVry Group's expectations or plans, may constitute forward-looking statements subject to the Safe Harbor Provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements generally can be identified by phrases such as DeVry Group or its management "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "foresees," "forecasts," "estimates" or other words or phrases of similar import. Actual results may differ materially from those projected or implied by these forward-looking statements. Potential risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause results to differ are described more fully in Item 1A, "Risk Factors," in DeVry Group's most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ending June 30, 2016 and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on August 25, 2016 and its most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ending December 31, 2016 and filed with the SEC on February 2, 2017.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DeVry Education Group and DeVry University have agreed to settle litigation brought by the Federal Trade Commission regarding DeVry University’s use of employment statistics in former advertising. We have agreed to pay $49.4 million to be distributed at the sole discretion of the FTC; forgive $30.4 million of institutional loans issued before Sept. 30, 2015; and forgive outstanding DeVry University accounts receivable balances by $20.2 million for former students. DeVry Group expects to record a related pre-tax settlement charge in the range of $52 million to $55 million in the second quarter of fiscal year 2017 arising from the monetary terms of the settlement. In addition, DeVry Group agreed that its institutions marketing to U.S. consumers will maintain specific substantiation to support any future advertising regarding graduate outcomes and educational benefits, and will implement training and other agreed-upon compliance measures. We anticipate the settlement will be entered as an agreed order by the court. DeVry Group chose to settle this action after filing an answer denying all allegations of wrongdoing. Student services and access to federal student loans are not impacted by the settlement, and at no time has the academic quality of a DeVry University education been questioned. DeVry Group is pleased this matter is reaching resolution, particularly as its institutions implement recently announced Student Commitments and as we continue our focus on investments that directly support our students’ success. Since 1931 DeVry Education Group has empowered its students to achieve their educational and career goals. DeVry Education Group Inc. (NYSE: DV; member S&P MidCap 400 Index) is a leading global education provider and the parent organization of American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Becker Professional Education, Carrington College, Chamberlain College of Nursing, DeVry Education of Brazil, DeVry University and its Keller Graduate School of Management, Ross University School of Medicine and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. For more information, please visit www.devryeducationgroup.com. Certain statements contained in this press release, including those that affect the expectations or plans of DeVry University or DeVry Group, may constitute forward-looking statements subject to the Safe Harbor Provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements generally can be identified by phrases such as DeVry University, DeVry Group or their management “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “forecasts,” “foresees,” “intends,” “plans” or other words or phrases of similar import. Because these forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, there are important factors that could cause DeVry Group’s actual results to differ materially from those projected or implied by these forward-looking statements. Potential risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause results to differ are described more fully in Item 1A, "Risk Factors," in DeVry Group’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016 and Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. These forward-looking statements are based on information as of December 15, 2016, and DeVry Group assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements even if experience or future changes make it clear that any projected results expressed or implied therein will not be realized.

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