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St. Louis, MO, United States

Duda S.W.,Ross and Baruzzini Inc.
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2015

Building system design engineers have many opportunities to hone their expertise in HVAC design throughout their career. However, many are called upon to design and specify mechanical systems related to fuel oil only occasionally. Those who design HVAC building systems on a near-daily basis will be assigned to design and specify the mechanical auxiliaries for engine generators or oil-fired boilers by those who assume that their expertise automatically extends to "anything mechanical." Some skills carry over well, but there are many facets of fuel oil system design that an experienced HVAC engineer will not necessarily be familiar with. Copyright 2015 ASHRAE.


Duda S.W.,Ross and Baruzzini Inc.
ASHRAE Transactions | Year: 2012

An article published in the December 2009 ASHRAE Journal suggested that a detailed modeling analysis, in lieu of a single-number such as IPLV per AHRI Standard 550/590-2003, should be used to make purchasing decisions for chillers, especially in multi-chiller applications. Detractors claim that an hourly modeling analysis is too cumbersome, whereas IPL V is easy. In this paper, a consulting engineer presents examples of an easy-to-use modeling method that is more true-to-life than IPL V for multi-chiller plant energy evaluations based on life cycle cost, for comparison of chiller purchasing options. © 2012 ASHRAE.


Duda S.W.,Ross and Baruzzini Inc.
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2013

In last month's column, Steve Taylor gave suggestions for laying out a chiller plant in a space-efficient and cost-efficient manner, without loss of energy efficiency. This month, I intend to address energy-efficiency improvements without loss of space and with minimal cost consequences, especially if they were included in the original design. These are all examples from actual facilities upon which I have performed energy audits. © Copyright 2013 ASHRAE.


Duda S.W.,Ross and Baruzzini Inc.
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2015

In my most recent Engineer's Notebook column four months ago,1 I gave a review of three important safety-oriented code requirements that tend to be overlooked in mechanical design. Reaction to that column was favorable, and I am still admittedly on my code soapbox, so I offer several more code requirements similarly overlooked. These are also critical safety- or service-related features applicable to building mechanical systems: code requirements that are frequently overlooked by engineers, design-build specialists, contractors, and even code officials. These are all real examples from actual facilities upon which I have performed property condition assessments, peer reviews I performed of designs by others, or retrofit of designs by others. Copyright © 2015 ASHRAE.


Duda S.W.,Ross and Baruzzini Inc.
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2014

The Fire and Smoke Damper Summary for HVAC engineers and designers based on the 2012 International Building Code is discussed. It is important to learn the differences between a fire wall, fire barrier, and fire partition and between a smoke barrier and smoke partition, so that we can properly apply (or not apply) fire and smoke dampers. No dampers are required in ducted penetrations of smoke partitions, including those in hospital corridor walls. One should not put any dampers in Type 1 grease exhaust and clothes dryer exhaust systems. If a fire or smoke damper placement will interfere with the operation of an engineered smoke exhaust system, approved alternate protection shall be used. Frame A means the blades, in the open position, partially block the free area of the duct. Frame B means the blades, in the open position, are completely outside the free area of the duct. Frame C is for round ducts. These frame types apply only to curtain-type fire dampers, not to multi-blade type dampers like most combination fire/smoke dampers. Fire dampers and smoke dampers must be accessible for service. If reaching inside the duct is necessary then we must provide a duct access door and a ceiling access panel or an accessible ceiling type.

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