Rose Li and Associates Inc.

Bethesda, MD, United States

Rose Li and Associates Inc.

Bethesda, MD, United States
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Moore H.M.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Kelly A.B.,Rose Li and Associates Inc. | Jewell S.D.,Van Andel Research Institute | McShane L.M.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | And 15 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2011

Human biospecimens are subject to a number of different collection, processing, and storage factors that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research utilizing human tissues, it is critical that information regarding the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications around biospecimen-related research and help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that the contributions are valued and respected. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Moore H.M.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Kelly A.B.,Rose Li and Associates Inc | Jewell S.D.,Van Andel Research Institute | McShane L.M.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | And 15 more authors.
Cancer Cytopathology | Year: 2011

Human biospecimens are subjected to collection, processing, and storage that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research that uses human tissues, it is crucial that information on the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications on biospecimen-related research and to help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that their contributions are valued and respected. © 2011 by the American Cancer Society.


Paddock S.,Rose Li and Associates Inc. | Brum L.,Rose Li and Associates Inc. | Sorrow K.,Rose Li and Associates Inc. | Thomas S.,Rose Li and Associates Inc. | And 12 more authors.
ecancermedicalscience | Year: 2015

Concerns about rising health care costs and the often incremental nature of improvements in health outcomes continue to fuel intense debates about 'progress' and 'value' in cancer research. In times of tightening fiscal constraints, it is increasingly important for patients and their representatives to define what constitutes 'value' to them. It is clear that diverse stakeholders have different priorities. Harmonisation of values may be neither possible nor desirable. Stakeholders lack tools to visualise or otherwise express these differences and to track progress in cancer treatments based on variable sets of values. The Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence (PACE) Continuous Innovation Indicators are novel, scientifically rigorous progress trackers that employ a three-step process to quantify progress in cancer treatments: 1) mine the literature to determine the strength of the evidence supporting each treatment; 2) allow users to weight the analysis according to their priorities and values; and 3) calculate Evidence Scores (E-Scores), a novel measure to track progress, based on the strength of the evidence weighted by the assigned value. We herein introduce a novel, flexible value model, show how the values from the model can be used to weight the evidence from the scientific literature to obtain E-Scores, and illustrate how assigning different values to new treatments influences the E-Scores. © the authors; licensee ecancermedicalscience.


Moore H.M.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Kelly A.,Rose Li and Associates Inc. | Jewell S.D.,Van Andel Research Institute | McShane L.M.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | And 15 more authors.
Biopreservation and Biobanking | Year: 2011

Human biospecimens are subject to a number of different collection, processing, and storage factors that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research utilizing human tissues, it is critical that information regarding the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications around biospecimen-related research and help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that the contributions are valued and respected. © 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Graae L.,Karolinska Institutet | Paddock S.,Rose Li and Associates Inc. | Belin A.C.,Karolinska Institutet
Genetics research | Year: 2015

Studies of complex genetic diseases have revealed many risk factors of small effect, but the combined amount of heritability explained is still low. Genome-wide association studies are often underpowered to identify true effects because of the very large number of parallel tests. There is, therefore, a great need to generate data sets that are enriched for those markers that have an increased a priori chance of being functional, such as markers in genomic regions involved in gene regulation. ReMo-SNPs is a computational program developed to aid researchers in the process of selecting functional SNPs for association analyses in user-specified regions and/or motifs genome-wide. The useful feature of automatic selection of genotyped markers in the user-provided material makes the output data ready to be used in a following association study. In this article we describe the program and its functions. We also validate the program by including an example study on three different transcription factors and results from an association study on two psychiatric phenotypes. The flexibility of the ReMo-SNPs program enables the user to study any region or sequence of interest, without limitation to transcription factor binding regions and motifs. The program is freely available at: http://www.neuro.ki.se/ReMo-SNPs/.


PubMed | Karolinska Institutet and Rose Li and Associates Inc.
Type: | Journal: Genetics research | Year: 2015

Studies of complex genetic diseases have revealed many risk factors of small effect, but the combined amount of heritability explained is still low. Genome-wide association studies are often underpowered to identify true effects because of the very large number of parallel tests. There is, therefore, a great need to generate data sets that are enriched for those markers that have an increased a priori chance of being functional, such as markers in genomic regions involved in gene regulation. ReMo-SNPs is a computational program developed to aid researchers in the process of selecting functional SNPs for association analyses in user-specified regions and/or motifs genome-wide. The useful feature of automatic selection of genotyped markers in the user-provided material makes the output data ready to be used in a following association study. In this article we describe the program and its functions. We also validate the program by including an example study on three different transcription factors and results from an association study on two psychiatric phenotypes. The flexibility of the ReMo-SNPs program enables the user to study any region or sequence of interest, without limitation to transcription factor binding regions and motifs. The program is freely available at: http://www.neuro.ki.se/ReMo-SNPs/.

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