Terre Haute, IN, United States
Terre Haute, IN, United States

Rose–Hulman Institute of Technology , formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small private college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics and science. Its 295-acre campus is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of Indiana’s best colleges for 2017. Of the 46 schools honored, 44 four-year schools made the list with University of Notre Dame, Purdue University, DePauw University, Valparaiso University and Butler University taking the top five spots. Ivy Tech Community College and Ancilla College were also included as the best two-year schools in the state. A list of all schools is included below. “Education can make a huge difference when it comes to the job market,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “These schools in Indiana have not only shown a commitment to providing quality degree programs, but also the employment services that contribute to student success as they pursue careers.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Indiana” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional data that includes annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, employment and academic services offered, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and the availability of financial aid. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Indiana” list, visit: Indiana’s Best Colleges for 2017 include: Ancilla College Anderson University Ball State University Bethel College-Indiana Butler University Calumet College of Saint Joseph DePauw University Earlham College Franklin College Goshen College Grace College and Theological Seminary Hanover College Huntington University Indiana Institute of Technology Indiana State University Indiana University-Bloomington Indiana University-East Indiana University-Kokomo Indiana University-Northwest Indiana University-Purdue University-Fort Wayne Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis Indiana University-South Bend Indiana University-Southeast Indiana Wesleyan University Ivy Tech Community College Manchester University Marian University Martin University Oakland City University Purdue University-Calumet Campus Purdue University-Main Campus Purdue University-North Central Campus Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Saint Joseph’s College Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College Saint Mary's College Taylor University Trine University Trine University-Regional/Non-Traditional Campuses University of Evansville University of Indianapolis University of Notre Dame University of Saint Francis-Fort Wayne University of Southern Indiana Valparaiso University Wabash College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENGINEERING EDUCATION | Award Amount: 48.23K | Year: 2016

The lack of systemic change in STEM education points to an important problem with the approach that the STEM education community has pursued thus far. Change has been targeted at the course and curriculum levels, focusing on teaching and learning methods and proving their efficacy. While beneficial, these activities have not fostered the strategies - such as motivation, communication, collaboration, and persuasion - that are necessary if individuals wish to enact change on larger, more institutional levels. These change strategies are well known but have not been brought into STEM education in a rigorous, accessible way. The workshop Making Academic Change Happen (MACH) fills the need for research-based skills development and assistance in creating a plan for change. Through targeted working sessions on specific topics participants learn research-proven strategies for making large scale change happen on their home campus. Our focus for the 2016 MACH Workshop is emerging engineering educators. The primary experience of graduate training is introduction to and acquiring competence in disciplinary research. We have determined, however, that new engineering educators are tasked with developing new courses, curricula, and programs. These initiatives require additional skills or areas of expertise: advising, mentoring, curriculum development, imaginative vision, program assessment, etc. None of these skills are likely addressed in a typical engineering Ph.D. curriculum. For these reasons, we argue that new engineering educators who envision themselves as change agents should work to adopt the disposition and skills of a change agent. Attending the MACH Workshop will help these educators start on their path as engineering education innovators.

The purpose of this workshop is 1) to assist emerging engineering educators in learning and practicing skills needed to lead change, and 2) prepare working documents around a variety of topics that are necessary to advance a change project. By fostering the development of these skills and mindsets in the very people who must lead change efforts, this workshop promotes meaningful change in STEM higher education. The change projects advanced by the workshop participants are expected to become model programs that can be used as example strategies and processes for others hoping to implement similar ideas. These projects reach beyond a single classroom, focusing more on the underlying processes, approaches, or philosophy of STEM education enacted on their campus. By working within the institutions context, the change agents trained during the MACH workshop will positively impact the student experience of STEM.

As part of this research, we will interview the emerging engineering educators about their change projects and provide them with mentors and support for their change activities. We will continue to offer mentorship after the workshop is over, and we will keep track of their progress on their change projects as they implement the MACH change strategies they learned during the workshop.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 104.25K | Year: 2014

This is a three-phase design-based research project for strengthening undergraduate engineering students metacognitive skills. It begins with prototype development and testing of 6 to 8 intervention modules, then transitions to refinement and improved development of these based on a variety of assessments, and ends with the preparation of materials for instructor professional development. Metacognition is often referred to as thinking about thinking because it relies on individual reflection and self-awareness. Learning science has found metacognition skill to be important precursor to becoming an effective independent learner and problem-solver. It is the foundation of becoming a lifelong learner. In order to deliberately cultivate metacognitive skills, this project has provided a structured definition that will facilitate this study of the impact of integrating metacognition into specific formal learning activities in engineering.

The first phase focuses on the development and pilot implementation of a coordinated set of intervention modules intended to strengthen the metacognitive skills of students in a sophomore engineering course at a small undergraduate engineering school. Included in the first phase is the assessment of impact on each students metacognitive development. Each intervention module consists of a training video on metacognitive knowledge and awareness, a contextualized classroom content module, and a modified standard assignment to provide students with opportunities to practice metacognitive regulation. The assessment effort is focused on developing indicators (rubrics and metrics) that engineering instructors can use to measure student progress in developing metacognitive skill.

In the second phase, the research outcomes from Phase 1 are used to revise the set of interventions for the testbed sophomore course and, additionally, prepare similar interventions for a second engineering education classroom context - a freshman course at a large comprehensive state land-grant university. The goal of the revisions is to improve the interventions and to focus on the transferability of both the interventions and the indicators to other lower division courses. The research aspect of Phase 2 refines the Phase 1 research questions and adds a focus on understanding what elements of an intervention and context are most important to consider when considering transferability to other courses and instructors. Finally, Phase 3 will focus on training faculty instructors, in order to boost the initial dissemination of intervention materials. The project will develop recommendations for instructors on how to further translate the set of interventions for use in their own classroom contexts. The PI team plans to develop and conduct training for instructors at both institutions. Open access to salient findings, tools, and guides will be provided through an online repository that is also linked through CLEERHub.org, a collaborative engineering education research site.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: COMMS, CIRCUITS & SENS SYS | Award Amount: 349.80K | Year: 2013

Manual breast exams and mammograms are currently the most effective and widely used techniques for early detection of breast cancer. Unfortunately, manual breast exams are limited in their ability to detect tumors since they only produce local information about the site where the force is applied. In addition, mammograms do not quantify tissue stiffness, an identifying characteristic of breast tumors. This projects long-term goal is to develop a system that automates, quantifies, and enhances the resolution of the manual breast exam. An electro-mechanical device will gently indent the tissue surface in various locations, recording the tissue surface deflections. This deflection data will be used with inverse techniques to provide detailed 3D maps of the elastic modulus of the interior of the breast tissue.

Intellectual Merit:
The proposed research takes an approach to early detection of breast cancer that utilizes a fundamental mechanical difference between cancerous and noncancerous tissue via an inverse problem approach. Although this stiffness difference is the basis of breast palpation, it has not been systematically investigated from an engineering point of view. Insights gained in this study may also have broad implications for flaw detection and localization of sparse sources.

Broader Impact:
This system has the potential to significantly increase the early detection of breast cancer with no unnecessary radiation, essentially no risk, and with little additional cost. Nearly forty undergraduate students will engage in interdisciplinary research that can make a difference in someones life, and develop outreach programs to impact over a hundred middle school students.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENGINEERING EDUCATION | Award Amount: 209.00K | Year: 2017

Within the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education community, there are repeated calls for changing the way students are educated. Knowledge of change processes are familiar to individuals in business and industry, but represent new arenas for engineering and computer science faculty who envision change in engineering and computer science education on their campuses. In this project, faculty are introduced to the knowledge, skills, and abilities of research-based change strategies through the customized Making Academic Change Happen Curriculum. This curriculum is delivered annually at the Revolutionizing Engineering and Computer Science Departments (RED) Program Investigator Meeting. After the meeting, faculty receive monthly support through coaching and through the community of change leaders represented in each RED cohort. The research part of this project uses observations, document analysis, phone interviews and focus groups to determine how the strategies impact the success or failure of each planned change project. In addition, the formation of a national cohort of change leaders in STEM education enlarges the community of scholars known to be engaged in change practices and can provide important models for change.

The lack of systemic change within the STEM education community points to an important problem with the approach to change that has been pursued thus far. Change has been targeted at the course and curriculum levels, focusing on teaching and learning. The project seeks to address this specific problem by addressing the following question: Can the limits of change in STEM education be overcome by focusing on the individual change agents in terms of their skills and change expertise?

In this project, the Making Academic Change Happen customized change curriculum is being offered at the Revolutionizing Engineering and Computer Science Departments (RED) Investigators Meeting. The work of three cohorts of RED recipients is being tracked as they use the knowledge, skills, and abilities offered in the customized curriculum to enact change on their own campuses. The intellectual merit of the research work lies in determining - through observation, document analysis, interviews, and focus groups - how change knowledge, skills, and abilities are learned, applied, and contribute to the success of each change project. The research questions addressed are as follows:

1. What are the baseline skills in change management that RED recipients possess at the start of their projects?
2. What traits/components/characteristics contribute to the success of engineering education change project leaders?
3. How does the MACH curriculum support a change leaders ability to make change?
4. How do change agents empower stakeholders to develop a shared vision for change?
5. How does contents, broadly defined, affect the ability to create and sustain change?

The broader impact of this project lies in the creation of a national leadership cohort for change in engineering and computer science education. By enlarging the community of scholars known to be engaged in change practices, the engineering and computer science communities benefit from models for change (described in the case studies produced by the project) and increased understanding of an individuals agency to affect change.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENGINEERING EDUCATION | Award Amount: 106.83K | Year: 2015

Within the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education community, there are repeated calls for changing the way we educate our students. These calls for change extend beyond the classroom experience to the curriculum, co-curricular experiences, and institutional levels. And yet, despite the development of research-based teaching strategies, innovative co-curricular projects, and many years of funding and development from a variety of foundations and corporations, change in STEM education is not pervasive.

The lack of systemic change points to an important problem with the approach to change that the STEM education community has pursued thus far. Change has been targeted at the course and curriculum levels, focusing on teaching and learning methods. These beneficial activities have not, however, fostered the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) in motivation, communication, collaboration, and persuasion that are the foundation for change on larger, more institutional levels. These change strategies are well documented in the literature of other disciplines, such as organizational psychology and behavior, but have not been brought into the conversation within STEM education in a rigorous, accessible way. The work proposed here seeks to address this specific problem by answering the following question: Can we overcome limits that prevent the diffusion of new ideas, can we overcome barriers to the adaption of effective practices, by focusing on the change agents themselves in terms of their skills and change expertise?

This project will study change agents who are engaged in making change on their campuses through the NSF Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (RED) Program. The co-PIs will provide RED recipients the opportunity to learn and develop the KSAs that research suggests are essential for effective change management, through a customized change curriculum that will be delivered during the annual meeting of RED recipients and supported through monthly conference calls. The co-PIs will also follow the work of these agents over a two-year period, capturing their reflections on their efforts during focus group interviews. From the qualitative data gathered during this EAGER Project, the co-PIs will develop rich case studies that highlight the KSAs required to promote change in STEM; these case studies will serve as models for faculty and administrators who wish to make significant change on their campuses. The approach of this EAGER project represents transformative research that does not fit well into other funding opportunities, because change management KSAs are not well integrated in engineering education presently. By demonstrating the importance of change management KSAs to effective change projects in engineering education, this project will provide faculty and administrators with a new model for change. Consequently, this work addresses the EAGER focus on high risk-high payoff, radically different approaches that develop new expertise and engage novel disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENGINEERING EDUCATION | Award Amount: 48.33K | Year: 2014

The lack of systemic change in STEM education points to an important problem with the approach that the STEM education community has pursued thus far. Change has been targeted at the course and curriculum levels, focusing on teaching and learning methods and proving their efficacy (Borrego, Froyd, & Hall, 2010). While beneficial, these activities have not fostered the underlying strategies, motivation, communication, collaboration, and persuasion that are the foundation for change on larger, more institutional levels. These change strategies are well documented in the literature of other disciplines, such as organizational psychology and behavior, but have not been brought into the conversation within STEM education in a rigorous, accessible way. The workshop Making Academic Change Happen (MACH) fills the need of academics for research-based skills development and assistance in creating a plan for change. Through targeted working sessions on specific topics (e.g. partnership development, generating buy-in, institutional context, and identity discovery), participants learn research-proven strategies for making large scale change happen on their home campus. The MACH workshop helps faculty reach beyond their specific classrooms to effect the systemic change needed to advance STEM education consistent with a concert of national voices (for example, the National Academy of Engineerings Engineer of 2020; President Obamas Educate to Innovate program; AAUs Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative). By focusing on strategies, plans, and the institutional framework, participants in the MACH workshop become change agents.

A typical college or university faculty member is not trained as a change agent, yet policy, administrators, and students are calling for change, especially in STEM fields. The purpose of this workshop is 1) to assist faculty members in learning and practicing skills needed to lead change, and 2) prepare working documents around a variety of topics that are necessary to advance a change project. By fostering the development of these skills and mindsets in the very people who must lead change efforts, this workshop promotes meaningful change in STEM higher education. The change projects advanced by the workshop participants are expected to become model programs that can be mined for examples strategies and processes for others hoping to implement similar ideas. These projects reach beyond a single faculty members classroom, focusing more on the underlying processes, approaches, or philosophy of STEM education enacted on their campus. By working within the institutions context, the change agents trained during the MACH workshop will positively impact the student experience of STEM.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 184.62K | Year: 2012

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is partnering with local industry in developing a certificate program in Test and Product Engineering. Test and product engineers are needed in the semiconductor industry to ensure that small manufacturing defects do not impact the performance of integrated-circuit chips. Staggering improvements in the semiconductor industry have resulted in devices with incredible performance at the cost of increasing test difficulty. The learning curve for test and product engineers is long and slow, and few universities provide students with background in this area.

To address this industrial need, this project is developing two Test and Product Engineering courses with an intense hands-on laboratory component to support a certificate program in Test and Product Engineering. Strong industrial input is ensuring that the courses and laboratories are relevant to industry needs. Educational research expertise is ensuring that the courses and laboratories are improving students higher-order thinking skills, creativity and problem-solving abilities. The project is applying a novel, industry-centered assessment strategy to determine whether the courses meet their goal of reducing the time it takes for students to be productive in the integrated-circuit industry. Materials are being developed to allow other universities to adopt these courses even if they do not have the expensive lab equipment necessary to perform the hands-on labs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENGINEERING EDUCATION | Award Amount: 49.60K | Year: 2017

The lack of systemic change in STEM education points to an important problem with the approach that the STEM education community has pursued thus far. Change has been targeted at the course and curriculum levels, focusing on teaching and learning methods and proving their efficacy. While beneficial, these activities have not fostered the strategies - such as motivation, communication, collaboration, and persuasion - that are necessary if individuals wish to enact change on larger, more institutional levels. These change strategies are well documented in the literature of other disciplines, such as organizational psychology and behavior, but have not been brought into the conversation within STEM education in a rigorous, accessible way. The workshop Making Academic Change Happen (MACH) fills the need of academics for research-based skills development and assistance in creating a plan for change. Through targeted working sessions on specific topics (e.g. partnership development, generating buy-in, institutional context, and identity discovery), participants learn research-proven strategies for making large scale change happen on their home campus. The focus group for the 2017 MACH Workshop is emerging engineering educators. The primary experience of graduate training is to be introduced to disciplinary research and then be provided with a means to gain further competence. We have determined, however, that new engineering educators are tasked with developing new courses, curricula, and programs. These initiatives require additional skills or areas of expertise: advising, mentoring, curriculum development, imaginative vision, program assessment, etc. None of these skills are likely addressed in a typical engineering Ph.D. curriculum. For these reasons, we believe that new engineering educators who envision themselves as change agents should work to adopt the disposition and skills of a change agent. Attending the MACH Workshop will help these educators start on their path as engineering education innovators.

The purpose of this workshop is to assist emerging engineering educators in: 1) learning and practicing skills needed to lead change, and 2) preparing working documents around a variety of topics that are necessary to advance a change project. By fostering the development of these skills and mindsets in the very people who must lead change efforts, this workshop promotes meaningful change in STEM higher education. The change projects advanced by the workshop participants are expected to become model programs that can be mined for examples strategies and processes for others hoping to implement similar ideas. These projects reach beyond a single classroom, focusing more on the underlying processes, approaches, or philosophy of STEM education enacted on their campus. By working within the institutions context, the change agents trained during the MACH Workshop will positively impact the student experience of STEM. As part of this research, the emerging engineering educators will be interviewed about their change projects and provided with mentors and support for their change activities. Mentorship will continue to be offered after the workshop is over. The progress on their change projects will also be tracked as they implement the MACH change strategies they learned during the workshop.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: TUES-Type 1 Project | Award Amount: 198.05K | Year: 2012

Project Description
This project is researching the hypothesis that motivation and learning in an introductory continuous time signals and systems (CTSS) course will improve if the theoretical presentation of material is augmented with weekly, sensory-based, application-oriented experiences. Laboratory exercises are being developed that are based on a hardware platform designed for measuring and processing realistic continuous-time signals. Summative assessments including surveys, focus groups, and specific rubrics applied to final exams are being used to measure changes in motivation and learning, in conjunction with baseline data that has been collected over a three-year period. The project incorporates learning theory in the development of materials to support student learning of the difficult engineering content that is associated with signals and systems related courses. Open-source modules are being produced that have a high potential for broad adoption. The effort also involves a comprehensive evaluation plan that is producing the data needed to convince others that they should consider adopting the platform.


Broader Significance
The process that is being utilized in creating signals and systems content is informing the development of other introductory engineering course modules. A workshop is being developed and will be held at national conferences in which the participants will get to perform some of the laboratory exercises and keep the platform that they use. Furthermore, dissemination of the assessment results and materials is also being distributed through national conferences and journal publications. The outreach activities of the project have further potential to positively impact K-12 students and interest them in pursuing careers in engineering. In addition to the focus on CTSS courses, the platform is being utilized in a K-12 outreach program called Explore Engineering (at Rose-Hulman). The materials developed for the program introduce middle/high-school students to the concept of frequencies in relation to music, sounds, and electrocardiograph (ECG) signals. These materials are available to the public and the experiences are informing the development of further outreach activities and collaborations.

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