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Åkirkeby, Denmark

Titschack J.,Center for Marine Environmental science | Titschack J.,Senckenberg Institute | Joseph N.,Senckenberg Institute | Fietzke J.,Leibniz Institute of Marine Science | And 3 more authors.
Sedimentary Geology | Year: 2013

The Plio-Pleistocene warm-temperate carbonate deposits along the SE coast of Rhodes (Greece) formed on a highly structured island 'shelf' during a major transgression-regression cycle, which reached bathyal depth during maximal transgression. The complex palaeobathymetry exhibits many characteristics of submarine canyons, especially of so-called 'blind' or 'headless' canyons - a canyon type, which is especially common in the modern Mediterranean. This study presents the palaeoenvironmental evolution of one of these canyons, which is today represented by the Lardos valley, eastern central Rhodes. The studied section comprises the middle Pleistocene (900-300. ka) and describes a shallowing-upward trend from bathyal to circalitoral depth. Thin fossiliferous debris flow layers document turnovers and abundance changes in fauna and floral of hard-bottom communities, which developed on the adjacent basement slopes and highs. The comparison of the obtained results with other studies from the southeastern coast of Rhodes suggests a high degree of diachroneity of lithological boundaries of these Plio-Pleistocene deposits, which can be best explained by progressive infill of small depocentres located at different altitude levels. Hence, lithological changes are interpreted to be time-transgressive from distal (low altitude) to proximal (high altitude) during transgression while time-transgressive from proximal to distal during regression. Consequently, the best chronostratigraphic correlation horizon is the surface of maximal transgression. The most probable age for this surface could be estimated at 1.1 to 0.8. Ma, 0.2-0.5. Ma younger than previous estimates. Furthermore, the current lithostratigraphic schemes for the Plio-Pleistocene deposits of southeastern Rhodes are reviewed and revised. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source


Vallon L.H.,Geomuseum Faxe OStsjaellands Museum | Rindsberg A.K.,University of West Alabama | Bromley R.G.,Ronnevej 97
Geodinamica Acta | Year: 2015

During the last few decades, many new ethological categories for trace fossils have been proposed in addition to the original five given by Seilacher. In this article, we review these new groups and present a version of the scheme of fossil animal behaviour originally published by Bromley updated with regard to modern ethological concepts, especially those of Tinbergen. Because some behaviours are more common in certain environments than others, they are useful in palaeoecological reconstructions, forming the original basis of the ichnofacies concept. To simplify, we summarise some ethological categories as previously done by others. However, the tracemaker’s behaviour in some cases is so distinctive that subcategories should be employed, especially in ecological interpretations of certain environments where a special behaviour may be dominant. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Source


Vallon L.H.,Geomuseum Faxe | Rindsberg A.K.,University of West Alabama | Bromley R.G.,Ronnevej 97
Geodinamica Acta | Year: 2016

During the last few decades, many new ethological categories for trace fossils have been proposed in addition to the original five given by Seilacher. In this article, we review these new groups and present a version of the scheme of fossil animal behaviour originally published by Bromley updated with regard to modern ethological concepts, especially those of Tinbergen. Because some behaviours are more common in certain environments than others, they are useful in palaeoecological reconstructions, forming the original basis of the ichnofacies concept. To simplify, we summarise some ethological categories as previously done by others. However, the tracemakers behaviour in some cases is so distinctive that subcategories should be employed, especially in ecological interpretations of certain environments where a special behaviour may be dominant. © 2015 Taylor and Francis. Source


Vallon L.H.,Geomuseum Faxe OStsjaellands Museum | Schweigert G.,Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde | Bromley R.G.,Ronnevej 97 | Roper M.,Burgermeister Muller Museum Solnhofen | Ebert M.,Jura Museum Eichstatt
Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae | Year: 2015

The shedding of exoskeletons is an important aspect of the lifecycle of some invertebrates (mainly arthropods). To rid themselves of the old cuticula (= exuvia), these animals often have to thrash about, twist around or rub themselves against the sediment or other more or less solid objects. In softgrounds, this behaviour may create distinctive patterns that have to be regarded as trace fossils. Accordingly, some ichnospecies of Rusophycus have recently been interpreted as traces made during ecdysis. Most of the so-called “Schwoimarken” from the Solnhofen lithographic limestones (Upper Jurassic, SE Germany), usually interpreted as structures made by dead organisms swaying in response to water movements, must be understood as traces of arthropod ecdysis. In this context, we erect Harpichnus bartheli igen. et isp. nov. and propose the new ethological category, ecdysichnia, for moulting traces. In most “Schwoimarken” containing body-fossil remains other than arthropods, we see sediment displacement by scavenging arthropods rather than mortichnia (sensu Seilacher, 2007). We further propose inclusion of the recently erected category pupichnia for pupation chambers as a subcategory of ecdysichnia. In our opinion, pupation is a special form of moulting that does not justify the splitting of categories, as briefly noted by Vallon et al. (2013). © 2015, Geological Society of Poland. All rights reserved. Source


Neumann C.,Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science | Wisshak M.,Senckenberg Institute | Aberhan M.,Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science | Girod P.,Holteistrasse 2 | And 2 more authors.
Acta Palaeontologica Polonica | Year: 2015

Saddle oysters (Anomiidae) attach themselves to calcareous hard substrates by means of a calcified byssus that etches an attachment structure, referred to as ichnospecies Centrichnus eccentricus. Examination of rich material from the Late Cretaceous of central Europe extends the fossil record of this ichnotaxon and revealed a set of previously unrecognised morphological features which appear to be typical for this time period and the respective anomiid trace maker. Excellent preservation of a large number of trace fossil specimens with a complete set of morphological characters allowed a biometrical analysis and additional observations indicating a distinct substrate preference for belemnite rostra, a strong intra- and interspecific competition for settlement space, as well as interactions with durophaguous predators. Further implications for anomiid palaeobiology and palaeoecology arise from allometric shell growth and an etched outline suture in the substrate along the dorsal, lateral and ventral shell margins. These features enhanced a firm attachment and increased shear resistance, and thus are interpreted as an effective defence mechanism against shell-crushing enemies under the intensified predation pressure in marine environments in the Late Cretaceous. © 2015 L. Xing et al. Source

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