Kutztown, PA, United States
Kutztown, PA, United States

Rodale Institute is an American 501 nonprofit that supports research into organic farming.Rodale Institute was founded in 1947 by J.I. Rodale in Emmaus, Pennsylvania. When J.I. Rodale died in 1971, his son Robert purchased 333 acres and moved the farm to its current site in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. Wikipedia.


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The Critical Role of Organics in U.S. Agriculture at the Organic & Non-GMO Forum Moyer, executive director at Rodale Institute, along with other sought-after industry experts, will examine the complexities of developing an organic or non-GMO supply chain at this second annual event, November 14-15 at the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis. Minneapolis, MN, October 30, 2016 --( Moyer has been helping farmers transition from conventional farming to organic methods for nearly a lifetime with his work at Rodale Institute, which is committed to groundbreaking research in organic agriculture, advocating for policies that support farmers, and educating people about organic options. In 2015, he was appointed executive director at the Institute. Moyer is a past chair of the National Organic Standards Board, a founding board member of Pennsylvania Certified Organic, and serves on various other boards. He also is the author of “Organic No-Till Farming,” a publication that has become a global resource. Broadening the discussion to supply chain challenges, speaker Kellee James, CEO of Mercaris, a market data service and trading platform for organic, non-GMO and other IP agricultural commodities, will present “Global Supply and Demand Trade Flows in Organic & Non-GMO Ingredients.” She will provide a snapshot of organic and non-GMO demand, highlighting the gaps in the trade flow along the way, and presenting an outlook for solutions to satisfy this demand. Speaker Ben Allen of Trimble will add depth to the conversation about the supply chain during his presentation “Creating Solutions for Traceability Along the Supply Chain” on opening day of the conference. At Trimble, a leading provider of advanced location-based solutions such as GPS, laser and optical technologies, Allen is enterprise solutions lead for agriculture. His session will explore the importance of traceability along the supply chain and introduce some of the novel tools to accomplish this. Learn more at www.ongforum.com and claim a 15% discount on registration with the code: RELEASE. Also visit Oilseed & Grain Trade Summit, the event that is co-located with the Forum. Host of the event, HighQuest Group, based in Danvers, Mass., is a strategic advisory, conference and media company serving corporations, financial investors and governments across the global food and agribusiness value chains. www.highquestgroup.com Minneapolis, MN, October 30, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Jeff Moyer, keynote speaker at next month’s Organic & Non-GMO Forum, will draw upon his four decades of experience with organic farming to explore how it has changed the world, and now through science, points the way to a regenerative future. Moyer, executive director at Rodale Institute, along with other sought-after industry experts, will examine the complexities of developing an organic or non-GMO supply chain at this second annual event, November 14-15 at the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis.Moyer has been helping farmers transition from conventional farming to organic methods for nearly a lifetime with his work at Rodale Institute, which is committed to groundbreaking research in organic agriculture, advocating for policies that support farmers, and educating people about organic options. In 2015, he was appointed executive director at the Institute.Moyer is a past chair of the National Organic Standards Board, a founding board member of Pennsylvania Certified Organic, and serves on various other boards. He also is the author of “Organic No-Till Farming,” a publication that has become a global resource.Broadening the discussion to supply chain challenges, speaker Kellee James, CEO of Mercaris, a market data service and trading platform for organic, non-GMO and other IP agricultural commodities, will present “Global Supply and Demand Trade Flows in Organic & Non-GMO Ingredients.” She will provide a snapshot of organic and non-GMO demand, highlighting the gaps in the trade flow along the way, and presenting an outlook for solutions to satisfy this demand.Speaker Ben Allen of Trimble will add depth to the conversation about the supply chain during his presentation “Creating Solutions for Traceability Along the Supply Chain” on opening day of the conference. At Trimble, a leading provider of advanced location-based solutions such as GPS, laser and optical technologies, Allen is enterprise solutions lead for agriculture. His session will explore the importance of traceability along the supply chain and introduce some of the novel tools to accomplish this.Learn more at www.ongforum.com and claim a 15% discount on registration with the code: RELEASE. Also visit Oilseed & Grain Trade Summit, the event that is co-located with the Forum.Host of the event, HighQuest Group, based in Danvers, Mass., is a strategic advisory, conference and media company serving corporations, financial investors and governments across the global food and agribusiness value chains. www.highquestgroup.com


Tonitto C.,Cornell University | Li C.,University of New Hampshire | Seidel R.,Rodale Institute | Drinkwater L.,Cornell University
Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems | Year: 2010

Ecosystem models are increasingly used to guide natural resource management policy decisions. In this study, we build on available agroecosystem policy modeling tools by testing two methodologies for applying the Denitrification-Decomposition (DNDC) model to naturally-drained, temperate grain cropping systems. We used long-term observations from the Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial (FST) to validate the DNDC model for application to grain cropping systems on silty clay loam soils typical of mid-Atlantic farmlands. Based on modeling efficiency (EF), Theil's Inequality (U2), and correlation coefficient (r) metrics, the DNDC model showed moderate fit between observations and simulations at annual time scales for drainage (EF = 0.34, U2 = 0.12, r = 0.74) and nitrate leaching (EF = -0. 05, U2 = 0. 4,r = 0.86). Replication of observed seasonal water flux and nitrate leaching trends were difficult to capture in model simulations, resulting in a weak fit between observations and simulations for drainage (EF = -1.2, U2 = 0.89, r = 0.28) and nitrate leaching (EF = -2.5, U2 = 2.1, r = 0.3). Our comparison of observations and model outcomes highlights the challenge of scaling up belowground fluxes to farm or watershed scales. Ecosystem model representation of water transport generally assumes highly homogeneous soil conditions. In contrast, data from lysimeter sampling represents a small percentage of the total study area and is unlikely to capture average soil field properties. Additionally, our Rodale work highlights the limitation of biogeochemistry models which use vertical mass movement to describe water drainage and nitrate leaching. The application of the DNDC model to the Rodale FST demonstrates that model studies are not a simple substitute for field observation. The predictive utility of model outcomes can only be broadened through rigorous testing against long-term field observations. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Zinati G.M.,Rodale Institute | Heckman J.R.,Rutgers University | Vodak M.C.,Rutgers University
Journal of Plant Nutrition | Year: 2016

Writing nutrient management plans for Christmas tree production requires accurate values for nutrient removal and harvest records. Freshly cut trees of each of Norway spruce (Picea abies), Canaan fir (Abies balsamea var. phanerolepis), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) were collected in December 2005. Minimum, maximum, and mean cut tree size measurements were documented. Nutrient contents were calculated and there were no significant differences in nutrient uptake values among species. In a spacing of 1.5 m × 1.5 m (4302 trees per hectare), a clear-cut harvest would remove on average (kg/ha) 560 nitrogen (N), 60.87 phosphorus (P), 168 potassium (K), 243.51 calcium (Ca), 37.75 magnesium (Mg), 28.25 sulfur (S), 0.54 boron (B), 3.39 iron (Fe), 4.74 manganese (Mn), 0.11 copper (Cu), 2.79 zinc (Zn), 2.92 aluminum (Al), 105.85 chlorine (Cl), 0.02 molybdenum (Mo), and 1.44 sodium (Na). Except for Mn and Na, nutrient removal increased linearly as dry weight of whole tree increased. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


PubMed | Rodale Institute, University of Maryland University College, Shepherd University and Rutgers University
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Environmental entomology | Year: 2016

The invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, poses significant risk to organic farming systems because they rely on biological control, nonsynthetic inputs, and cultural tactics for pest management. This study evaluated the potential of five crop plants (sorghum, admiral pea, millet, okra, and sunflower) to be used as trap crops under organic production in four mid-Atlantic states. Stink bug (H. halys and endemic species) densities and host plant phenologies were recorded weekly (mid-June through September). Sorghum attracted significantly more H. halys than the other crops evaluated, followed by sunflower and okra. Seasonal average H. halys density was 1.5-4 higher on sorghum than the other crops (P < 0.05), depending on site. Endemic stink bugs were equally attracted to all crops except admiral pea. A significant effect of time was detected (P < 0.0001), with H. halys densities initially higher on sunflower; as the sunflower senesced, sorghum supported significantly higher average H. halys densities. While sunflower and sorghum phenologies differed, these crops together provided a 5-wk attraction period coinciding with peak H. halys activity. The efficacies of pheromone-baited traps, flaming, applying OMRI-approved insecticides (Azera and Venerate), and vacuuming to removing stink bugs were evaluated as a management tactic. Flaming was the most effective treatment against H. halys and endemic stink bugs. Our results suggest that a trap crop composed of sorghum and sunflower may be an effective management tool for the mid-Atlantic stink bug complex, including H. halys. Future research should address the appropriate size and placement of trap crop within the farm.


Douds Jr. D.D.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Nagahashi G.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Wilson D.O.,Rodale Institute | Wilson D.O.,Kings Agriseeds Inc. | Moyer J.,Rodale Institute
Plant and Soil | Year: 2011

Producing nonmycorrhizal plants in the field is a challenge due to the ubiquitous distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungi and impacts of chemical treatments upon nontarget organisms. A field plot was covered with ground cover fabric to prohibit plant growth and take advantage of the obligate symbiotic nature of AM fungi to selectively starve and remove them from the soil microbiological community. The decline in the AM fungus population was monitored through spore counts and most probable number bioassays. Response to inoculation experiments were conducted to contrast the response of Allium porrum L. to inoculation with in vitro produced spores of Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith when plants were grown in the AM fungus-depleted soil vs. soil from an adjacent, cropped plot. Data indicated a strongly diminished, yet still viable population of AM fungi after 39 months of bare fallow. Plants grown in cropped soil showed no growth response nor increase in percentage root length colonized as a result of inoculation, while the response to inoculation of plants grown in the covered soil increased as the population of AM fungi declined below 1 propagule cm-3. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).


Ullrich S.D.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Buyer J.S.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Cavigelli M.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Seidel R.,Rodale Institute | Teasdale J.R.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Weed Science | Year: 2011

Weed seed persistence in soil can be influenced by many factors, including crop management. This research was conducted to determine whether organic management systems with higher organic amendments and soil microbial biomass could reduce weed seed persistence compared with conventional management systems. Seeds of smooth pigweed and common lambsquarters were buried in mesh bags in organic and conventional systems of two long-term experiments, the Farming Systems Project at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Maryland, and the Farming Systems Trial at the Rodale Institute, Pennsylvania. Seed viability was determined after retrieval at half-year intervals for 2 yr. Total soil microbial biomass, as measured by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) content, was higher in organic systems than in conventional systems at both locations. Over all systems, locations, and experiments, viable seed half-life was relatively consistent with a mean of 1.3 and 1.1 yr and a standard deviation of 0.5 and 0.3 for smooth pigweed and common lambsquarters, respectively. Differences between systems were small and relatively inconsistent. Half-life of smooth pigweed seeds was shorter in the organic than in the conventional system in two of four location-experiments. Half-life of common lambsquarters was shorter in the organic than in the conventional system in one of four location-experiments, but longer in the organic than in the conventional system in two of four location-experiments. There were few correlations between PLFA biomarkers and seed half-lives in three of four location-experiments; however, there were negative correlations up to-0.64 for common lambsquarters and-0.55 for smooth pigweed in the second Rodale experiment. The lack of consistent system effects on seed persistence and the lack of consistent associations between soil microbial biomass and weed seed persistence suggest that soil microorganisms do not have a dominating role in seed mortality. More precise research targeted to identifying specific microbial functions causing seed mortality will be needed to provide a clearer picture of the role of soil microbes in weed seed persistence. © 2011 Weed Science Society of America.


Tunick M.H.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Paul M.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Ingham E.R.,Soil Foodweb Inc. | Karreman H.J.,Rodale Institute | Van Hekken D.L.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
International Journal of Dairy Technology | Year: 2015

Characteristics of conventional milk and milk from a herd transitioning from nongrazing to organic were studied by comparing adjacent farms over a 12-month period. Levels of short- and medium-chain fatty acids partially responsible for aroma and flavour were initially lower in the milk from the transitioning herd, but not after the cows had settled into an organic diet. Once that point was reached, the amount of α-linolenic acid in the transitioning herd milk exceeded that of the conventional herd. This case study demonstrates that subtle differences occur in the milk as cows transition to organic. © 2015 Society of Dairy Technology.


Ryan M.R.,Pennsylvania State University | Smith R.G.,Pennsylvania State University | Mirsky S.B.,Sustainable Agricultural Systems Laboratory | Mortensen D.A.,Pennsylvania State University | Seidel R.,Rodale Institute
Weed Science | Year: 2010

Community assembly theory provides a useful framework to assess the response of weed communities to agricultural management systems and to improve the predictive power of weed science. Under this framework, weed community assembly is constrained by abiotic and biotic "filters" that act on species traits to determine community composition. We used an assembly approach to investigate the response of weed seed banks to 25 yr of management-related filtering in three different row-crop management systems in southeastern Pennsylvania: organic manure-based, organic legume-based, and conventional. Weed seed banks were sampled in April of 2005 and 2006 and quantified by direct germination in a greenhouse. We also assessed the filtering effects of weed management practices and relationships between assembled seed bank and emergent weed communities by allowing or excluding weed control practices within each management system and measuring emergent weed community response. Germinable weed seed bank densities and species richness in the final year of the study were over 40 and 15 higher, respectively, in the organic systems relative to the conventional system. Seed bank community structure in the organic systems was different from the conventional system, and the relationships between assembled seed banks and the emergent flora varied. Primary tillage, weed control, timing of planting, and fertility management appeared to be the main filters that differentiated weed seed banks in the three systems. Weed life history, emergence periodicity, seed size, and responsiveness to soil fertility and hydrology appeared to be the most important functional traits determining how weed species responded to management-related filters. Our results suggest that management systems can exert strong filtering effects that can persist over relatively long (greater than one growing season) time scales. Legacy effects of community-level filtering might be more important than previously assumed, and should be incorporated into predictive models of weed community assembly. © 2010 Weed Science Society of America.


Douds D.D.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Nagahashi G.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Hepperly P.R.,Rodale Institute
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2010

On-farm production of arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungus inoculum can be employed to make the benefits of the symbiosis more available to vegetable farmers. Experiments were conducted to modify an existing method for the production of inoculum in temperate climates to make it more readily adoptable by farmers. Perlite, vermiculite, and peat based potting media were tested as diluents of yard clippings compost for the media in which the inoculum was produced using bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) as host plant. All produced satisfactory concentrations of AM fungus propagules, though vermiculite proved to be better than potting media (89 vs. 25 propagules cm-3, respectively). Two methods were tested for the growth of AM fungi indigenous to the farm: (1) adding field soil into the vermiculite and compost mixture and (2) pre-colonizing the bahiagrass seedlings in media inoculated with field soil prior to transplant into that mixture. Adding 100 cm3 of field soil to the compost and vermiculite produced 465 compared to 137 propagules cm-3 for the pre-colonization method. The greater flexibility these modifications give will make it easier for farmers to produce inoculum of AM fungi on-the-farm. © 2009.


Trademark
Rodale Institute | Date: 2013-03-04

hydroponic garden kit for home and commercial use comprising growing containers and also including hydroponic compost, fertilizers, seeds, substrate, drain components and instructional materials.

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