Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Ford, CO, United States

Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Ford, CO, United States
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News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Interlink Co., Ltd., the official operator of the .Earth domain registry, today celebrates the one-year anniversary of the public launch of the .earth top-level domains (TLD), which have been widely embraced as a platform for bringing awareness to global issues. From environmental activists to NGOs and even geospatial companies, a wide-range of global organizations have embraced .Earth domains as a strategy for enhancing their overall missions, business models, and online branding. “The .Earth domain is all about connecting and establishing cooperative relationships between individuals and organizations that wish to show their support for making Earth a better place,” said Jacob Williams, Interlink General Manager of Domain Services. “And, we are excited to see this vision come to life in the first year of its existence on the public market.” A number of organizations have not only embraced the new domain, but have also shared their voices regarding the value that they have gained. For example, Plan B is an organization that is establishing a networked movement that supports NGOs and other organizations to enact legal action to keep everyone accountable for climate change. “It seemed like a really good omen that just as we were setting this up, the .Earth top level domain became available. The domain is beautifully simple. It communicates the things that we believe in, which is protecting all forms of life. It was a very effective way for conveying what we stand for. A country-level domain would have been completely wrong for what we are trying to do,” said Tim Crosland, the Director of Plan B, in this Voices.Earth podcast interview. In addition, Access Earth is a user-generated platform that adds and searches for data about accessibility in hotels, businesses and restaurants across the world. “Since we have Earth in our name and we thought .Earth would make a perfect fit. It makes us stand out … and it is a great opportunity for us. It’s a great talking point, as well,” said Matt McCann, CEO and Founder of Access Earth in this Voices.Earth podcast interview. Catalog.Earth aims to preserve the world’s most endangered landscapes in 360-degree video, and is working with NPR to document majestic locations such as the Rocky Mountain National Park. “We chose an .Earth domain extension because it perfectly conveys our mission and because there is no better domain for this effort,” said David Al-Ibrahim and Saba Singh, the Founders of Catalog.Earth, in this Voices.Earth podcast interview. Finally, the Democracy Earth Foundation aims to change the face of political engagement, and was the first organization to launch a .Earth domain in 2015. In addition, CO2.earth was another organization to embrace using a .Earth domain extension prior to public launch. “The .Earth domain name clearly expresses our belief in a borderless world that empowers individuals anywhere,” said Santiago Siri, one of the founders of the Democracy Earth Foundation. To receive ongoing updates about the value and promise of the .Earth TLD, be sure to check out the Voices.Earth site, which contains updates and news about planet Earth. About Interlink Co., Ltd. Interlink Co., Ltd. is a Tokyo-based technology company founded in 1994. Interlink runs a successful Internet service provider (ISP) business and offers a wide range of Internet-related services. The company has been developing the .Earth top-level domain (TLD) since 2011 and secured the rights to the TLD in 2014. Interlink executed a contract with ICANN, the governing authority of the global domain name system (DNS) in December 2014, allowing the company to operate the ".Earth" TLD. Learn more about .Earth at http://domain.earth.


News Article | September 20, 2016
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell commemorated the National Park Service’s 100 birthday in a speech late Thursday, calling their creation “one of the nation’s most revolutionary ideas — that these lands, our iconic historic sites and our culturally significant places should belong to every American.” Standing on a stage erected near the Roosevelt Arch at the north entrance of Yellowstone National Park near Gardiner, Mont., Jewell said, “I can think of no better place to commemorate this milestone than here, at America’s first national park, under a big sky, on a crisp night, in the shadows of beautiful mountains and on the shoulders of conservation giants who came before us.” About 6,000 people gathered to hear country bands play and numerous speakers, including a Theodore Roosevelt impersonator who introduced Jewell. Roosevelt has gone down in history as a titan of conservation, but it was President Woodrow Wilson who created the service in 1916 that now oversees more than 410 parks, monuments and historic sites on 85 million acres in the 50 states and territories. But there was concern in the night air even as Jewell spoke about the future of the parks. Will the Park Service survive a second century? [What will reshape national parks most in their new century? Climate change, the director says.] The natural beauty of the parks is unquestioned, but the human touches that make them accessible aren’t all pretty. The system faces a $12 billion maintenance shortfall that has left infrastructure as big as bridges and small as restrooms in disrepair. Yellowstone’s backlog alone is $603 million, facing crumbling roads, buildings and wastewater systems. Congress has declined to provide funding needed for fixes that have lingered for more than a decade. Another looming challenge lies in who comes to the parks. The average age of its visitors is as high as 63 years old at some sites, and the Park Service is unsure how to entice younger people away from cities and the Internet. Climate change is making matters worse. Before attending the celebration at Yellowstone, Jewell scaled a summit at Glacier National Park in Montana and met with scientists to discuss how rising temperatures have caused Grinnell Glacier, the most accessible one in North America, to virtually disappear. Rising temperatures and and sea-level rise are grinding away at the Assateague Island National Seashore. A decrease in snow and rain has stunted the growth of vegetation in several parks, including Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona and Mojave National Preserve in California, leaving bighorn sheep with little to eat. [Graphic: Your essential guide to all 59 U.S. national parks] It is projected to be a banner year for the Park Service, with attendance topping 330 million for the first time — a 23 million increase over last year. The top national park draws are Great Smoky Mountain National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee, with 10.7 million visitors in 2015; Grand Canyon, with 5.5 million visitors; and Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado and Yosemite National Park in California, both with about 4.15 million visitors. The most stalwart park visitors are disappearing, though, because of aging and death. The question of how to draw more young people and minorities who were historically alienated from parks is unsolved. Jewell wants to diversify the visitors and ensure that “the service is relevant to all Americans and engaging the next generation,” according to an announcement of Thursday’s events. The splendor of the parks is tough to oversell. Visiting national parks, Americans sometimes find themselves face to face with bison and within shouting distance of bears. They walk across earth charred by lava and watch it flow down cliffs into the Pacific Ocean. There are also pulsing geysers, eye-popping views from cliffs, canyons the size of big cities, and rich animal diversity. Many of the millions of people who visit the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial and Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site are unaware that they’re all maintained by the Park Service. [America’s most accessible glacier is melting down to nothing] More visitors add to the numbers of people who encounter problems. “Restroom facilities have been closed, trails have not been maintained because there’s no money so visitors can’t take hikes,” said Theresa Pierno, president and chief executive of the National Parks Conservation Association. “Sometimes campgrounds and services are lacking,” all while more people are coming to parks, Pierno said. “It’s a very serious issue.” For years, Congress has declined to increase the Park Service’s appropriation above about $3 billion. Republican members instead called on the Government Accountability Office to investigate whether the Park Service was collecting enough visitor fees and membership dues to address the problem on its own. In a December report, the GAO concluded that Congress’s $3.1 billion appropriation over about a decade amounted to an 8 percent funding drop when adjusted for inflation. Lawmakers who called on the service to create a higher revenue stream overlooked one major obstacle: Congress. It virtually barred the agency from increasing rates and must pass a law to change that. But even if the Park Service could increase fees, will there be enough visitors to pay them a few decades from now? Many park visitors are older than 65, and at that age, entrance is free. The bulk of paying visitors are between 50 and 60, paving the way for a revenue crash in the next decade. The Park Service desperately needs new visitors as it moves into its new century. [The Park Service wants to pull more youngsters into parks. But first, they must defeat Madden NFL and Pokemon.] That’s where Sangita Chari comes in. As the program manager for the Office of Relevancy, Diversity and Inclusion, her job is to increase the number of African American, Latino, Native American and Asian employees. The hope is that they, with the help of a five-year-old recruitment program for more diverse visitation, will become a beacon for minorities. It’s been a hard slog, Chari said. “The issue we have with our minority employees is our turnover rates mirror our recruitment rates,” she said, meaning that they lose as many as they recruit. Traditionally, “it’s expected that to move up, you move from park to park,” Chari said, and postings in remote locations may make minorities feel particularly isolated. “We also have a challenge retaining millennials,” Chari said. “Unless we stem our retention issues … build a more inclusive environment, we will continue to remain stable.” At Yosemite, John Jackson, a park ranger who is black, said he goes out of his way to make members of underrepresented groups feel welcome when they show up at the park. “If you like reading a book, I tell them you can sit by the river. It could be a good place to take a nap,” he said. “I let them know the park is an open space for many different activities. But don’t try to do too much. If you have one day or one hour, just do one thing.” [Without $250 million in repairs, Washington’s Memorial Bridge will only be safe for walkers.] Jackson visited Yosemite while living in Los Angeles in 1978 and fell in love. He worked there off and on for a few years before joining the staff permanently eight years ago. “If I see a horse, I want to ride it. If I see water, I want to swim. If I see snow shoes, I want to use them,” he said. Not everyone shares his sense of adventure. “People come here and say I’m scared of bears … how are they going to enjoy the place if they think there’s a bear around every corner?” Fear, he said, can be overcome, but he said the Park Service as yet isn’t doing enough to lure people to its wide-open spaces for that to happen. He said the Park Service doesn’t do enough to tell the story of how people who weren’t white helped to build Yosemite and other parks. Yosemite dwells too much on the contributions of John Muir, whose love for the Sierra Nevada led to the creation of the park in 1890. “We keep talking about him,” Jackson said. “If we spent more time talking about American Indian contributions, maybe we would get them. If we talked about African Americans, maybe we would get more. The Chinese built roads here. “We know John Muir,” he said. “Multiple groups made this place famous historically, not just one group.”


News Article | November 25, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Frieda the Fox Continues Adventures in Two New Stories by Kimberly Baltz Dog Ear Publishing reviews a new children’s book that once again stars Frieda the Fox in two heart-warming adventure stories. Denver, CO, November 25, 2016 --( In “Frieda Tails Volume 3,” Frieda and her friend Wendy visit the zoo in the city one night, meeting all kinds of interesting animals. While they are there, they learn an important lesson about taking care of places where wild animals live, thanks to their new friend Tina, a tiger. In the book’s second story, Frieda and her daughter Fannie get invited to a tea party with the author and her mother. They spend the afternoon drinking tea, eating cake, and playing games on top of a hill. Along the way, they learn the importance of manners, the value of having animals as friends and making new friends. The book’s rhymes make the stories easy to follow, and readers will find a delicious recipe for lemon cheesecake that they can try. Marty Petersen created the charming full-color illustrations for the book, which is the third in a series starring Frieda. Frieda’s character is based on a real fox that regularly visits the author’s family home in Grand Lake, Colo., near Rocky Mountain National Park. Baltz received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and graduated from the University of Colorado School of Law. Baltz, who has written stories and poetry since she was a young girl, also enjoys working with acrylics and pastels to create art. Petersen has degrees in illustration and commercial art from the Kendall School of Design in Michigan. Petersen, who grew up drawing, sculpting and painting, has worked as a designer and illustrator for several years and enjoys illustrating children’s stories. The two also collaborated on the first and second books in the series. For additional information, please visit www.friedatails.com Frieda Tails Volume 3: Frieda Goes to the Zoo & A Tea Party with Frieda Kimberly Baltz Dog Ear Publishing ISBN: 978-1-4575-4965-6 30 pages Perfectbound $14.99 US ISBN: 978-1-45754-766-9 30 pages Hardcover $24.99 US ISBN: 978-1-45755-037-9 digital eBook $7.99 US Available at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere. About Dog Ear Publishing, LLC Dog Ear Publishing offers completely customized self-publishing services for independent authors. We provide cost-effective, fast, and highly profitable services to publish and distribute independently published books. Our book publishing and distribution services reach worldwide. Dog Ear authors retain all rights and complete creative control throughout the entire self-publishing process. Dog Ear Publishing reviews services and other book marketing services are available to connect great content with interested readers. Self-publishing services are available globally at www.dogearpublishing.net and from our offices in Indianapolis. Dog Ear Publishing – self-publishing that actually makes sense. Denver, CO, November 25, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Frieda the Fox and her friend Wendy the Wolf love to have adventures together. A new book released by Dog Ear Publishing shares their latest outing – a nighttime visit to the zoo. In addition, Frieda attends a tea party with her daughter, Fannie.In “Frieda Tails Volume 3,” Frieda and her friend Wendy visit the zoo in the city one night, meeting all kinds of interesting animals. While they are there, they learn an important lesson about taking care of places where wild animals live, thanks to their new friend Tina, a tiger.In the book’s second story, Frieda and her daughter Fannie get invited to a tea party with the author and her mother. They spend the afternoon drinking tea, eating cake, and playing games on top of a hill. Along the way, they learn the importance of manners, the value of having animals as friends and making new friends. The book’s rhymes make the stories easy to follow, and readers will find a delicious recipe for lemon cheesecake that they can try.Marty Petersen created the charming full-color illustrations for the book, which is the third in a series starring Frieda. Frieda’s character is based on a real fox that regularly visits the author’s family home in Grand Lake, Colo., near Rocky Mountain National Park.Baltz received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and graduated from the University of Colorado School of Law. Baltz, who has written stories and poetry since she was a young girl, also enjoys working with acrylics and pastels to create art.Petersen has degrees in illustration and commercial art from the Kendall School of Design in Michigan. Petersen, who grew up drawing, sculpting and painting, has worked as a designer and illustrator for several years and enjoys illustrating children’s stories. The two also collaborated on the first and second books in the series.For additional information, please visit www.friedatails.comFrieda Tails Volume 3: Frieda Goes to the Zoo & A Tea Party with FriedaKimberly BaltzDog Ear PublishingISBN: 978-1-4575-4965-6 30 pages Perfectbound $14.99 USISBN: 978-1-45754-766-9 30 pages Hardcover $24.99 USISBN: 978-1-45755-037-9 digital eBook $7.99 USAvailable at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere.About Dog Ear Publishing, LLCDog Ear Publishing offers completely customized self-publishing services for independent authors. We provide cost-effective, fast, and highly profitable services to publish and distribute independently published books. Our book publishing and distribution services reach worldwide. Dog Ear authors retain all rights and complete creative control throughout the entire self-publishing process. Dog Ear Publishing reviews services and other book marketing services are available to connect great content with interested readers. Self-publishing services are available globally at www.dogearpublishing.net and from our offices in Indianapolis.Dog Ear Publishing – self-publishing that actually makes sense. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Dog Ear Publishing


DENVER, CO--(Marketwired - February 27, 2017) - Colorado is gearing up for an unforgettable summer filled with new offerings for visitors. For more information on Colorado, visit www.COLORADO.com. Estes Park Celebrates its Centennial: The town of Estes Park will celebrate its 100th birthday in 2017. The town was established on April 17, 1917, and boasts several historic landmarks, attractions and more. Vail Craft Beer Classic, June 16th-18th, 2017: This June, the Vail Valley will become a hub for craft beer enthusiasts at the inaugural Vail Craft Beer Classic with over 300 beers, dozens of events, yoga, and more. Haute Route, June 24-30, 2017: The Haute Route is the first global series of multi-day cycling events for amateurs taking cyclists from Boulder to Colorado Springs with stops in Avon, Crested Butte, Snowmass and Winter Park. Slow Food Nations, July 14-16, 2017: Slow Food USA and Slow Food International will launch their first U.S. Slow Food event, Slow Food Nations in Denver with a street food festival, gravitas of a food systems conference and inspiration of a cultural exchange. Velorama Festival and Colorado Classic Pro Cycling, August 10-13, 2017: Pro bicycle racing returns to Colorado with the Colorado Classic, and in Denver, a new companion music, food and crafts festival dubbed "Velorama." Yoga On The Mountain Debuts in Snowmass, August 11-13, 2017: The three-day festival will feature over 60 diverse yoga classes, music, meditation, personal discussions and more. Outerbike Comes to Crested Butte, August 18-20, 2017: Outerbike, the biggest mountain bike demo on earth, comes to the Rocky Mountains for the first time ever showcasing Crested Butte and the Gunnison Valley's 750 miles of mountain bike trails. Animas River Whitewater Park Expands: The Animas River Whitewater Park recently underwent an expansion that includes the addition of a fish ladder, a bypass channel and several fun new water features. Breckenridge Walking Tour & Photography Workshop: This tour, lead by internationally recognized photographer Louie Traub, will take guests on a walking journey of Breckenridge while providing them with the opportunity to photograph historical buildings and artifacts, the arts district and surrounding mountains. Canyoning Adventures Now Offered in Ouray: Canyoning Colorado will offer canyoning descents and trainings in the quaint mountain town of Ouray, which has been frequented by seasoned canyoners for years due to its abundance of canyons and waterfalls. Classic Palisade Wine Country Guided Bike Tour: Indulge your appetite for supreme wines and incomparable cycling. Pedal quiet country roads into the heart of Colorado Wine Country. Colorado National Park Tour: Travelers now have a convenient new way to explore the varied landscapes and experiences of Colorado's four stunning National Parks. The Colorado National Parks Tour takes road trippers from Denver on a seven- to 10-day route. The Denver Zoo Debuts Tiger Exhibit: Located on almost a full acre on the southeastern edge of the park, The Edge tiger exhibit will bring guests closer than ever to the Zoo's Amur tigers. Epic Discovery Comes to Breckenridge Ski Resort: Vail Resorts' innovative summer offering, Epic Discovery, arrives in Breckenridge in summer 2017 with interactive exploration zones, story stakes, animal ability experiences, climbing wall, Aerial Adventure Tour, zip lines and more. Four New Natural Areas Opened in Fort Collins: Four new Natural Areas have been added to Fort Collins' network of 41 sites: Goose Hollow, Tanglewood, Soaring Vista and Flores del Sol. Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park's New Haunted Mine Drop: New for summer 2017, the Haunted Mine Drop will leave guests breathless as they drop approximately 100 feet on the only drop ride in the world that goes down inside a mountain. Lazy B Chuckwagon and Western Show Announces Reopening: The tradition of the Lazy B Chuckwagon dinner and Western show lives on from its opening in the early 1960s. The "new" Lazy B is hard work of the past combined with new talent. Lily Farm Fresh Skin Care Opens Organic Farm Center: The new Lily's Organic Farm Center will be home to Lily Farm Fresh Skin Care's USDA-certified farm and laboratory and will act as a venue for special events. Loveland Offers New Bike & Brews Tour: Tap into Colorado's epic cycling opportunities and taste the flavor of local craft brews on the new Loveland Bike & Brews Guided Day Tour. Ouray Hot Springs Pool Undergoes Major Renovation: The 90-year-old Ouray Hot Springs Pool & Fitness Center is undergoing a major renovation and will unveil the modern improvements in May 2017. Outlaw Mountain Coaster Opens in Steamboat: Steamboat is working with world-class manufacturer Wiegand to install the Outlaw Mountain Coaster, the longest coaster in North America. Rocky Mountain National Park Expansion: At the end of 2016, a 42-acre piece of commercial property located within the park boundaries came under the protection of the National Park Service. The Cascade Cottages are now open for park visitors to enjoy. Royal Gorge Dinosaur Experience Additions in Canon City: New for summer 2017, the Royal Gorge Dinosaur Experience will feature two new exhibits including the most complete full-scale stegosaurus cast in the world and a "time wall" that will showcase the story of evolution. Soaring Adventures Course at the Broadmoor: Experience the thrill of soaring over steep drops and across Seven Falls Canyon on the new Fins Course at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs. Telluride Golf Club Expands Practice Facility: This season, the club will direct a major expansion of the practice facility designed by noted course architect Ken Kavanaugh. Tesoro Cultural Center Introduces New Living History Experience: Tesoro Cultural Center introduces its new Living History Experience programming, available to the public starting June 1, 2017 at The Fort restaurant in Morrison. The Broadmoor Fly Fishing Camp to Offer Cattle Drive Experiences: New this summer, The Broadmoor Fly Fishing Camp will begin offering half-day cattle drive experiences on a working cattle ranch located on several thousand acres in the high country of South Park, Colorado. Brown Palace Hotel Celebrates 125 Years: This August, Denver's Brown Palace Hotel and Spa will celebrate its 125th anniversary with special offerings and events all year long. Cattle Drive Week at Sylvandale Dude & Guest Ranch: A six-night stay dude ranch adventure, running July 2-8 and 9-15, includes a hands-on cattle drive of Sylvandale's beef herd to the Colorado high country. Epitourean Culinary Adventures in the Heart of the Rocky Mountains: This week-long culinary experience will be based in Snowmass with visits to a working dairy farm, cider mill, distillery, brewery and even a cooking class in neighboring Aspen with culinary delights only accessed on foot, hybrid bikes and customized Jeeps. Farm to Flame Exclusive Package Introduces Four Seasons Guests to 7X Ranch: The Four Seasons Resort Vail's curated Farm to Flame experience includes a private helicopter ride to 7X Ranch in Hotchkiss, an intimate dining experience at Flame's Chef's Table and shipments of 7X beef directly to guest's homes. High Altitude Cycling Camp at Park Hyatt Beaver Creek: From June 3-8, cyclists of all abilities can join eight time Tour de France competitor and Olympic Gold Medalist, Tyler Hamilton for the ultimate High Altitude Cycling Camp. The Hotel Telluride's 'Crack a Coors on Wilson Peak' Package Returns: This three-night package includes a private, guided tour by the San Juan Outdoor School to the summit of Wilson Peak complete with a picnic lunch. The package also includes daily breakfast for two and spa treatments. Ranchlands Camp Experience Available at Chico Basin and Zapata Ranch: New for 2017, Ranchland Camps are based out of extraordinary tent camps that place guests in the heart of each ranch. Tent camps come complete with hot showers, beds and specially prepared meals. The St. Regis Aspen Resort's Mala Creation and River Blessing with Seeds of Remembrance: The Mala Creation and River Blessing with Seeds of Remembrance at the St. Regis Aspen includes a one-on-one consultation and river blessing experience from Alexa Webster, founder of Seeds of Remembrance. Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort to Open: This vintage bicycle-themed hotel with amenities and activities suited to the needs of cyclists is located on a popular designated bike route connecting Colorado Springs and Manitou Springs. Dunton Town House Opens in Telluride: The recently opened Dunton Town House is a beautiful five bedroom bed & breakfast in the historic mining town of Telluride. After a day of exploring Telluride, visitors return to charming rooms decorated with European fabrics and custom furnishings. Echo Canyon River Expeditions Adds Luxury Cabins and Glamping Tents: The nine luxury cabins are designed to maximize the southwest-facing views of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains with plenty of outdoor living space. The Eleven Experience Debuts Taylor River Lodge: Eleven Experience has officially unveiled Taylor River Lodge, a quintessential Colorado mountain retreat with rustic yet chic cabins situated on a pristine trout fishing and rafting river. The Glamping Co. Offer's Glamping Yurt Experiences: By partnering with private landowners and the U.S. Forest Service, Glamping Co. offers beautiful and comfortable yurt accommodations and provides unique educational and recreational experiences for guests to enjoy. The Great Wolf Lodge Comes to Colorado Springs: Thrill seekers will find all the water slide drops, loops and spin outs they crave at Colorado Springs' first indoor water park resort. Even bedtime is unique with oversize suites featuring wolf dens and cabins with bunk beds. Hotel Born, to Open in Denver's Union Station Neighborhood: Slated to open in early April 2017, Kimpton's Hotel Born brings together local influences and sophisticated design to create the perfect urban refuge with original pieces by local Denver artists and will be home to Tavernetta by Frasca. Hotel Indigo to Debut in Denver: Opened in January 2017 and anchoring downtown Denver's thriving Union Station neighborhood, Hotel Indigo Denver delivers a refreshing and inviting guest experience that is truly reflective of the Mile High City. The Maven to Open in Denver: The Maven, a vibrant independent hotel concept, will open in spring 2017 in Dairy Block, Denver's most innovative new urban development. The Maven will celebrate local talents with a rotating collection of creative art and handmade products. The Ramble Hotel to Open in Denver: The Ramble Hotel, an independently owned, three-story hotel will open in late 2017 with 50 guestrooms; an intimate theatre and bar; an independently owned restaurant; and a marquee lobby bar, Death & Co Denver. SunMountain Shala Opens in Manitou Springs: The SunMountain Shala Wellness B&B features three historic homes situated on six acres of terraced gardens, complete with walking and meditation trails. IV by Brother Luck Debuts in Colorado Springs: Celebrity chef, Brother Luck, announces his newest project, IV by Brother Luck, will open in Spring 2017. IV by Brother Luck will feature a menu of new American fare with a focus on the historical cuisine of the four corners region. Aspen Kitchen opens Rickhouse Social: New for 2017, Rickhouse Social is a convivial and comfortable gathering spot offering Breckenridge Distillery programs and products designed for whiskey aficionados and celebration seekers alike. Axe and the Oak Opens in Colorado Springs: Now open in Ivywild School, Axe and the Oak whiskey is handcrafted and distilled in Colorado Springs by four friends using raw materials sourced from a family farm. Breckenridge Distillery Restaurant Opens: Chef Daniel O'Brien (the Top Chef contestant behind Washington D.C.'s Seasonal Pantry) is leading the way on the intimate and modern farm-to-table experience at the Breckenridge Distillery. Crafted Beverages of Southwest Colorado Celebrates Region's Craft Beverage Producers: Crafted Beverages of Southwest Colorado is a new marketing campaign dedicated to promote the region's 30+ independent breweries, wineries and distilleries connected by iconic scenic byways and trail systems. Drink RiNo Collective: Beginning Saturdays in January 2017, DRiNk RiNo, a collective comprised of Denver's River North neighborhood craft beverage providers, are offering free ETuk Denver rides to participating independent craft breweries, cideries and wineries. Frank Bonanno to Unveil French 75 in Downtown Denver: Celebrated chef Frank Bonanno will open French 75 this spring in downtown Denver. The casual Parisian-inspired bistro will blur the lines between the bar and the kitchen, giving guests a front seat to the craft of the cooks and the bartenders. Ginger & Baker to Open in Fort Collins Feeder Supply: The historic Fort Collins Feeder Supply building is on-track to open as Ginger & Baker this spring, replete with a coffee and pie shop, two restaurants, as well as a small retail store, wine cellar, tasting room, and teaching kitchen. Hearth & Dram to Open in Denver's Union Station Neighborhood: Hearth & Dram opened its doors in mid-January 2017, in the bustling Union Station area. It features rustic American fare that is both adventurous and approachable, paired with the largest whiskey selection in Downtown Denver. PlumpJack Group Brings Successful Formula to Pendulum: Pendulum, a new modern, upscale restaurant opens in the heart of Vail Village this winter and features innovative American cuisine accented with Latin influences. Stanley Marketplace Debuts: Officially opening in early 2017, Stanley is no ordinary marketplace. It is an adaptive reuse community hub, home to a park, beer hall and more. TacoParty to Open in Grand Junction: Celebrated chef Josh Nirenberg of Bin 707 Foodbar is opening TacoParty in March 2017, which will be a 50-seat, quick-service taco shop with a farm-to-table ethos. Ultreia Opens in Denver's Historic Union Station: Coming to Denver's historic Union Station in early 2017, James Beard Best Chef Southwest Jennifer Jasinski will open Ultreia in the building's Great Hall.


Sharpe P.J.,National Park Service | Kneipp G.,National Park Service | Forget A.,Rocky Mountain National Park
Wetlands | Year: 2016

We performed an assessment of U.S. Geological Survey/National Park Service (USGS/NPS) vegetation mapping versus National Wetland Inventory (NWI) estimates of wetland occurrence and extent for three national parks, each having a different NWI mapping scale (1:40,000, 1:58,000, and 1:80,000). Our prediction was that the USGS/NPS mapping would be significantly more effective than NWI in predicting total wetland area within each park, and would commit fewer errors of omission and commission. For use as a control group, each park had recent wetland field determination data collected in accordance with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers protocols. Contrary to our prediction, mean NWI wetland area estimates were more accurate than USGS/NPS mapping at the 1:40,000 and 58,000 scales. At the 1:80,000 scale, NWI and USGS/NPS estimates were similar. NWI wetland area estimates were not significantly different (α = 0.05) from the control data at two of the study parks, whereas USGS/NPS estimates were significantly larger than the control group at two of the three parks. This research highlights the relative strength of NWI mapping for landscape level wetland analysis, and the need to support remote sensing data by allocating field resources for accuracy assessment in specific areas based on management goals. © 2016 US Government


Monahan W.B.,National Park Service | Cook T.,National Park Service | Melton F.,California State University, Monterey Bay | Melton F.,NASA | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Resource managers at parks and other protected areas are increasingly expected to factor climate change explicitly into their decision making frameworks. However, most protected areas are small relative to the geographic ranges of species being managed, so forecasts need to consider local adaptation and community dynamics that are correlated with climate and affect distributions inside protected area boundaries. Additionally, niche theory suggests that species' physiological capacities to respond to climate change may be underestimated when forecasts fail to consider the full breadth of climates occupied by the species rangewide. Here, using correlative species distribution models that contrast estimates of climatic sensitivity inferred from the two spatial extents, we quantify the response of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) to climate change in Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado, USA). Models are trained locally within the park where limber pine is the community dominant tree species, a distinct structural-compositional vegetation class of interest to managers, and also rangewide, as suggested by niche theory. Model forecasts through 2100 under two representative concentration pathways (RCP 4.5 and 8.5 W/m2) show that the distribution of limber pine in the park is expected to move upslope in elevation, but changes in total and core patch area remain highly uncertain. Most of this uncertainty is biological, as magnitudes of projected change are considerably more variable between the two spatial extents used in model training than they are between RCPs, and novel future climates only affect local model predictions associated with RCP 8.5 after 2091. Combined, these results illustrate the importance of accounting for unknowns in species' climatic sensitivities when forecasting distributional scenarios that are used to inform management decisions. We discuss how our results for limber pine may be interpreted in the context of climate change vulnerability and used to help guide adaptive management.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.accesswire.com

LAS VEGAS, NV / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2016 / Estes Park, Colorado, located 90 miles northwest of Denver, is known as The Gateway to The Rockies. Teeming with elk, deer, bighorn sheep, black bear, and much more. It is also full of culture with plenty of shopping, fun festivals that celebrate each season, and plenty of opportunity to reconnect with your family and create priceless memories. The mountain terrain and mild temperatures, with summer highs around 80 degrees Fahrenheit and lows in the 40s, make ideal conditions for outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, rock climbing, camping, and wildlife- and bird- watching. Estes Park is not just one vast wilderness, though. The city is also teeming with a multitude of dining and shopping experiences. The Diamond Resorts International® Historic Crags Lodge, ideally located in the heart of Estes Park on the north side of Prospect Mountain and only 3 miles from Rocky Mountain National Park, is everything you would imagine in a quiet Colorado retreat. Discover The Historic Crags Lodge and become a part of an ongoing family history that began nearly 100 years ago. "The Crags" first opened its doors on the fourth of July 1914, making it the third oldest lodge in Estes Park. The founder, Joe Mills, and his brother Enos, played a large part in establishing The Rocky Mountain National Park. Discover affordable luxury and comfort in one of the studio, one- or two-bedroom accommodations featuring a queen size bed, sleeper sofa and a well-appointed bathroom. Enjoy the convenience of the fully-equipped kitchen, cable television, flat screen TV, DVD/VCR player, and on-site complimentary laundry facilities. Historic Crags Lodge is the kind of place you can return to time and time again, so you will always Stay Vacationed.™ Diamond Resorts International®, with its network of more than 420 vacation destinations located in 35 countries throughout the continental United States, Hawaii, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, Central America, Europe, Asia, Australasia, and Africa, provides guests with choice and flexibility to let them create their dream vacation, whether they are traveling an hour away or around the world. Our relaxing vacations have the power to give guests an increased sense of happiness and satisfaction in their lives, while feeling healthier and more fulfilled in their relationships, by enjoying memorable and meaningful experiences that let them Stay Vacationed™. Diamond Resorts International® manages vacation ownership resorts and sells vacation ownership points that provide members and owners with Vacations for Life® at over 420 managed and affiliated properties and cruise itineraries.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

LAS VEGAS, NV / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2016 / Estes Park, Colorado, located 90 miles northwest of Denver, is known as The Gateway to The Rockies. Teeming with elk, deer, bighorn sheep, black bear, and much more. It is also full of culture with plenty of shopping, fun festivals that celebrate each season, and plenty of opportunity to reconnect with your family and create priceless memories. The mountain terrain and mild temperatures, with summer highs around 80 degrees Fahrenheit and lows in the 40s, make ideal conditions for outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, rock climbing, camping, and wildlife- and bird- watching. Estes Park is not just one vast wilderness, though. The city is also teeming with a multitude of dining and shopping experiences. The Diamond Resorts International® Historic Crags Lodge, ideally located in the heart of Estes Park on the north side of Prospect Mountain and only 3 miles from Rocky Mountain National Park, is everything you would imagine in a quiet Colorado retreat. Discover The Historic Crags Lodge and become a part of an ongoing family history that began nearly 100 years ago. "The Crags" first opened its doors on the fourth of July 1914, making it the third oldest lodge in Estes Park. The founder, Joe Mills, and his brother Enos, played a large part in establishing The Rocky Mountain National Park. Discover affordable luxury and comfort in one of the studio, one- or two-bedroom accommodations featuring a queen size bed, sleeper sofa and a well-appointed bathroom. Enjoy the convenience of the fully-equipped kitchen, cable television, flat screen TV, DVD/VCR player, and on-site complimentary laundry facilities. Historic Crags Lodge is the kind of place you can return to time and time again, so you will always Stay Vacationed.™ Diamond Resorts International®, with its network of more than 420 vacation destinations located in 35 countries throughout the continental United States, Hawaii, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, Central America, Europe, Asia, Australasia, and Africa, provides guests with choice and flexibility to let them create their dream vacation, whether they are traveling an hour away or around the world. Our relaxing vacations have the power to give guests an increased sense of happiness and satisfaction in their lives, while feeling healthier and more fulfilled in their relationships, by enjoying memorable and meaningful experiences that let them Stay Vacationed™. Diamond Resorts International® manages vacation ownership resorts and sells vacation ownership points that provide members and owners with Vacations for Life® at over 420 managed and affiliated properties and cruise itineraries. LAS VEGAS, NV / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2016 / Estes Park, Colorado, located 90 miles northwest of Denver, is known as The Gateway to The Rockies. Teeming with elk, deer, bighorn sheep, black bear, and much more. It is also full of culture with plenty of shopping, fun festivals that celebrate each season, and plenty of opportunity to reconnect with your family and create priceless memories. The mountain terrain and mild temperatures, with summer highs around 80 degrees Fahrenheit and lows in the 40s, make ideal conditions for outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, rock climbing, camping, and wildlife- and bird- watching. Estes Park is not just one vast wilderness, though. The city is also teeming with a multitude of dining and shopping experiences. The Diamond Resorts International® Historic Crags Lodge, ideally located in the heart of Estes Park on the north side of Prospect Mountain and only 3 miles from Rocky Mountain National Park, is everything you would imagine in a quiet Colorado retreat. Discover The Historic Crags Lodge and become a part of an ongoing family history that began nearly 100 years ago. "The Crags" first opened its doors on the fourth of July 1914, making it the third oldest lodge in Estes Park. The founder, Joe Mills, and his brother Enos, played a large part in establishing The Rocky Mountain National Park. Discover affordable luxury and comfort in one of the studio, one- or two-bedroom accommodations featuring a queen size bed, sleeper sofa and a well-appointed bathroom. Enjoy the convenience of the fully-equipped kitchen, cable television, flat screen TV, DVD/VCR player, and on-site complimentary laundry facilities. Historic Crags Lodge is the kind of place you can return to time and time again, so you will always Stay Vacationed.™ Diamond Resorts International®, with its network of more than 420 vacation destinations located in 35 countries throughout the continental United States, Hawaii, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, Central America, Europe, Asia, Australasia, and Africa, provides guests with choice and flexibility to let them create their dream vacation, whether they are traveling an hour away or around the world. Our relaxing vacations have the power to give guests an increased sense of happiness and satisfaction in their lives, while feeling healthier and more fulfilled in their relationships, by enjoying memorable and meaningful experiences that let them Stay Vacationed™. Diamond Resorts International® manages vacation ownership resorts and sells vacation ownership points that provide members and owners with Vacations for Life® at over 420 managed and affiliated properties and cruise itineraries.


Muths E.,U.S. Geological Survey | Bailey L.L.,Colorado State University | Watry M.K.,Rocky Mountain National Park
Biological Conservation | Year: 2014

Quantitative evaluations of reintroductions are infrequent and assessments of milestones reached before a project is completed, or abandoned due to lack of funding, are rare. However, such assessments, which are promoted in adaptive management frameworks, are critical. Quantification can provide defensible estimates of biological success, such as the number of survivors from a released cohort, with associated cost per animal. It is unlikely that the global issues of endangered wildlife and population declines will abate, therefore, assurance colonies and reintroductions are likely to become more common. If such endeavors are to be successful biologically or achieve adequate funding, implementation must be more rigorous and accountable. We use a novel application of a multistate, robust design capture-recapture model to estimate survival of reintroduced tadpoles through metamorphosis (i.e., the number of individuals emerging from the pond) and thereby provide a quantitative measure of effort and success for an "in progress" reintroduction of toads. Our data also suggest that tadpoles released at later developmental stages have an increased probability of survival and that eggs laid in the wild hatched at higher rates than eggs laid by captive toads. We illustrate how an interim assessment can identify problems, highlight successes, and provide information for use in adjusting the effort or implementing a Decision-Theoretic adaptive management strategy. © 2014.


Walter W.D.,National Wildlife Research Center | Lavelle M.J.,National Wildlife Research Center | Fischer J.W.,National Wildlife Research Center | Johnson T.L.,Rocky Mountain National Park | And 2 more authors.
Wildlife Research | Year: 2010

Abundant populations of elk (Cervus elaphus) are cherished game in many regions of the world and also cause considerable human-wildlife conflicts through depredation on agriculture and speciality crops, lack of regeneration to native ecosystems, collisions with vehicles and transmission of disease between free-ranging and farmed hoofstock. Management of elk varies, depending on current and historical agency objectives, configuration of the landscapes elk occupy, public perception, population density and behaviour of elk. Selection of the method to manage elk often requires knowledge of timing of impacts, duration relief from elk damage is desired, cost-effectiveness of management activities, tolerance of impacts, public perception of management strategies and motivation or habituation of elk to determine the likelihood of success for a proposed management action. We reviewed methods that are available to control abundant populations of elk that include lethal (e.g. hunting, sharpshooting) and non-lethal (e.g. fertility control, frightening) options. We promote an integrated approach that incorporates the timely use of a variety of cost-effective methods to reduce impacts to tolerable levels. Lethal options that include regulated hunting, sharpshooting and aerial gunning vary by likelihood of success, duration needed for population reduction, cost to implement reduction and public perceptions. Several non-lethal options are available to affect population dynamics directly (e.g. fertility control, translocation), protect resources from damage (e.g. fences, repellents) or influence space use of elk on a regular basis (e.g. harassment, frightening, herding dogs, humans). Public perception should be considered by agencies that are looking for feasible methods to control populations of elk. Disturbance to residents or visitors of public property may influence methods of management employed. Future research should explore the duration of harassment needed to avert elk from sensitive areas and costs to implement such programs. Several methods in our review were implemented on deer and additional research on elk and other cervids in conflict with human interests would provide a much needed component to our understanding of management methods available for ungulate species. © CSIRO 2010.

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