BOYERTOWN, PA, United States
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News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

In a continuing effort in the fight against childhood cancer, Rockland awarded the Joy Cappel Young Investigator Award (JCYIA) to two Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF) Young Investigator grantees. In addition, Rockland is donating over $150,000 in reagents for the projects of ALSF Young Investigator and ‘A’ Award grantees with active grants. The JCYIA includes the development of customized polyclonal antibodies by Rockland to further the research of Abhinav Dey, PhD (Young Investigator 2015) and Asen Bagashev, PhD (Young Investigator 2016). Dey and Bagashev received the award at the ALSF Young Investigator Summit in Chicago in October. Dey is researching personalized treatments for pediatric brain tumors. Bagashev is researching targeted therapies for relapsed B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The JCYIA, named in honor of former Rockland president and CEO Joy Cappel, is intended to foster research conducted by a promising post-doctoral fellow, graduate student or young investigator performing research in the areas of oncology, nuclear signaling, developmental biology, epigenetics, immunology, microbiology, neuroscience, signal transduction or stem cell technology. This award is in the form of a free-of-charge custom polyclonal antibody development project from Rockland. Researchers investigating novel targets face a difficult hurdle when antibodies to their target are not commercially available. The JCYIA program gives researchers the opportunity to design a unique polyclonal antibody specific to their research, often resulting in a successful journal publication. Additionally, Rockland makes the antibody available to other researchers after validation as part of Rockland’s catalog antibody collection. Since inception, ALSF has worked diligently to attract young doctors to the field of pediatric oncology, recognizing that these researchers hold future keys to better treatments and ultimately cures to end childhood cancers. The Young Investigator and ‘A’ Award grants reflect this belief. In addition to the two, ALSF funds several other grant categories to researchers on the front lines of the childhood cancer fight. For more information, visit: http://www.ALSFgrants.org. About Childhood Cancer Childhood cancer is a general term used to describe cancer in children occurring regularly, randomly and sparing no ethnic group, socioeconomic class, or geographic region. Childhood cancer extends to over a dozen types of cancers and a countless amount of subtypes. Just a few of these cancer types include: Ewing’s sarcoma, glioma, leukemia, lymphoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Wilms’ tumor. In the United States, childhood cancer is the leading cause of death by disease in children under the age of 15. Every day, approximately 250 kids around the world die from cancer, accounting for 91,250 losing their lives to the disease every year. About Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF) emerged from the front yard lemonade stand of cancer patient Alexandra “Alex” Scott (1996-2004). In 2000, 4-year-old Alex announced that she wanted to hold a lemonade stand to raise money to help find a cure for all children with cancer. Since Alex held that first stand, the Foundation bearing her name has evolved into a national fundraising movement, complete with thousands of supporters across the country carrying on her legacy of hope. To date, Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, a registered 501(c)3 charity, has raised more than $127 million toward fulfilling Alex’s dream of finding a cure, funding over 650 pediatric cancer research projects nationally. For more information on Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, visit AlexsLemonade.org. About Rockland Immunochemicals, Inc. Rockland Immunochemicals, Inc. supports the academic, biopharma, and diagnostic industries with antibodies and antibody based tools used in basic research, assay development, and preclinical studies. With facilities in Pennsylvania for over 50 years, Rockland manufactures products ideally suited for integration into critical assays such as western blotting, immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence microscopy (IF), ELISA and flow cytometry. Additional information about Rockland’s life science tools and services can be found at http://www.rockland-inc.com.


Albro H.S.,Rockland, Inc.
Journal of New England Water Environment Association | Year: 2015

Pressure sewers have been installed throughout New England over the past 45 years and there is still discussion on the best way to operate them in terms of ownership. This article presents the approach and results of two New England communities, Chelmsford and Marion, Mass. The two communities have followed different paths; however, both installations have been successful and each demonstrates that success and greater operation and maintenance reliability result when communities share in the oversight and operation of these systems. Key characteristics of these successful installations are discussed along with modifications to operating methods based on "lessons learned" from 12 years of operation. Actual cost data and mean-time-between-servicecalls (MTBSC) data are evaluated in light of data on installation issues, abuse, and system wear and tear. Political and public perception aspects are also presented.


Patent
Rockland, Inc. | Date: 2014-06-26

Recombinant B. burgdorferi proteins, representative of the life cycle, are membrane-immobilized to capture antibodies in biological samples. Lateral flow technology incorporating gold colloid deposition results in band visualization indicative of a positive test.


Patent
Rockland, Inc. | Date: 2014-11-07

A member formed of a set of elongated corrugated cardboard plies secured together with a biodegradable adhesive along the lengths thereof and coated with a biodegradable coating which may be stacked to form a support for a portion of an elongated weighty member.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2014

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Post-transcriptional RNA modification plays an important role in biological processes. For example, adenosines to nosiness or A-to-I editing are most abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) and essential for normalCNS development. Presently, the available reagents for detection, quantitation, or immunoprecipitation of modified RNA are extremely limited. Rockland Immunochemicals is collaborating with Aptagen to develop synthetic antibodies for detection and quantitation of modified RNAs. In Phase I, as a proof-of-principle, high-affinity and target-specific aptamers and aptamer-based detection assays for inosine and N6- methyladenosine containing RNA will be developed. In Phase II, aptamer reagents and assays to morethan 60 RNA modifications known in eukrayotes will be developed. These affinity reagents will be used in microarrays to profile RNA modifications in different mouse CNS disorder models. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE:


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 249.97K | Year: 2013

Medical imaging and targeted therapy are the central components in the clinical management of cancer patients. Rockland Immunochemicals, Inc. is teaming up with Abzyme Therapeutics LLC to develop novel imaging agents that can be used in both cancer diagnosis and targeted therapy. In this phase I proposal, high-affinity camelid single domain antibodies to three cancer biomarkers HER2, EGFR and mesothelin will be developed. The antibodies will be directionally conjugated to near-infrared spectrum fluorescentdyes. Properties of the nanobody, including in vivo clearance, rapid tumor accumulation, in vivo stability and bioavailability, will be investigated in tumor xenograft animal models. In the Phase II, selected antibodies will be conjugated with chelators for radiolabeling with metal radionuclides. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamics, immunogenic and toxicological characteristics of agents will be investigated in animal models to obtain data necessary for filing an Investigational New Drug application. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.94K | Year: 2010

PTEN/Akt/mTORC 1and2 signal pathway is a critical regulator of cell survival, cell growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, cellular metabolism, cell migration and invasion and glucose uptake. A number of anticancer drugs in clinical trials are targeting this pathway. In Phase I, we will develop reliable, accurate, quantitative and sensitive multiplexed hybrid ELISA/qPCR assay (ELISA combined with quantitative PCR) to accurately monitor protein level and post-translational modifications of the pathway proteins in cells exposed to anticancer drugs rapamycin and LY294002. The ELISA/qPCR kit will be manufactured and written SOPs will be created. In Phase II, we will further improve the assay and use it to quantify the number of target molecules containing important combinations of post-translational modifications in clinical samples of a wide range of cancers. The availability of a sensitive, quantitative and standardized multiplexed ELISA/qPCR will aid clinicians and researchers to profile PTEN/Akt pathway protein members in a number of diseases and predict the efficacy of cancer treatment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 299.95K | Year: 2010

Antibody therapy offers treatment for a wide range of diseases and can extend the life of cancer patients, but the treatment cost is extremely expensive. as patent protection of some current antibodies will expire in coming years, there is an opportunity to develop generic and lower priced versions of these therapeutic biologics for the treatment of cancer. To accelerate the development of a generic version of the popular anticnacer drugs Herceptin, Rituxan, Zevalin and Erbitux.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.87K | Year: 2011

The RON and c-MET signal pathways are critical regulators of cell growth, survival, migration, differentiation, and drug resistance. High levels of activated RON or c-MET have been observed in a number of human cancers. Activation of RON and c-MET by phosphorylation initiates a signal transduction cascade that promotes cancer cell proliferation, invasiveness, apoptotic and drug resistance, and metastasis. A number of anticancer drugs currently in clinical trials are targeting both of of these pathways. Further, the activation state and protein levels of RON and c-MET are good indicators of drug treatment efficacy and cancer cell survival outcome. In Phase I, we will develop a quantitative immunoassay to monitor the phosphorylation state of either RON or GAB1(the target of c-MET) in various activated and unactivated cancer cell lines. The ELISA kit will be manufactured and written SOPs created. In Phase II, we will use the RON or GAB1 kit to measure activation and protein levels in clinical samples from a wide range of cancers and additional PD assays, including studies using drugs that upregulate or downregulate these targets. The availability of RON and GAB1 detection kits will aid clinicians and researchers to monitor these proteins in a number of diseasesand predict the efficacy of cancer treatment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.00K | Year: 2011

In response to this NCI solicitation, Rockland proposes to develop a novel method to assay the pharmacodynamic (PO) properties of anti-cancer small molecules targeting the PI3K/mTOR/AKT signaling pathway by quantitatively and independently measuring the phosphorylation of each unique AKT isoform in a validated multiplex immunoassay. The developed PD-AKT-ELISA would offer improved personalized medicine, whereby physicians would prescribe a dosage according to the pharmacodynamic effects of anti-cancer drugson individual patients, or modify therapeutic modality based on the feedback for each individual Akt isoform. We plan to use a number of anti-cancer drug candidates in this study and to produce reagents, including monoclonal antibodies to measure inactiveand active AKT isoforms suitable for a fit-for-use theranostic quantitative biomarker ELISA for AKT. The PO-AKT-ELISA and associated reagents will be produced, optimized, validated and applied to both solid tumor and soft tumor xenograft tissue. The reagents and validated assay will measure all AKT isoforms in its active and inactive states to fill a need not currently addressed by products or technologies commercially available to researchers and clinicians. The end result will be a multiplex assay thatcan be used by most existing immunoassay readers in both a research and high through-put clinical environment. Assay results will allow physicians to more precisely target dosages or types of drugs that modulate the PI3K/mTOR/AKT pathway, and will ultimately lower treatment costs by more accurately prescribing effective doses of anticancer drugs and potentially shortening the duration of drug treatment regimens.

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