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MADISON, Wis., April 12, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cellectar Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:CLRB), an oncology-focused clinical stage biotechnology company, today announces it has appointed John Friend, II, M.D. as vice president and chief medical officer effective April 17, 2017. “Cellectar has accelerated and expanded its research and development program to include multiple clinical trials for our lead product candidate CLR 131, as well as the active preclinical development of additional compounds utilizing our PDC platform,” said Jim Caruso, president and CEO of Cellectar Biosciences. “John’s depth of drug development experience in the biopharmaceutical industry, specifically, advancing drugs from preclinical stage through clinical studies, as well as successful oversight of the regulatory process, precisely meets our current need in helming our PDC programs and we look forward to benefitting from his leadership.” Dr. Friend, age 47, brings 15 years of global drug development expertise and general management experience in oncology, inflammation, endocrine/metabolism, and pain management to Cellectar.  Prior to joining the company, John spent more than seven years at Helsinn Therapeutics leading its research and development division.  Most recently he served as senior vice president of Medical and Scientific Affairs at Helsinn, building the non-clinical, clinical, medical and regulatory affairs teams to lead multiple global franchises from early product development to market commercialization. Prior to his time at Helsinn, Dr. Friend held executive responsibility for clinical research, medical affairs, pharmacovigilance and risk management at various pharmaceutical companies including Akros Pharma, Actavis, Alpharma, Hospira and Abbott.  After obtaining an undergraduate degree in Chemistry from Southern Methodist University, John earned his medical degree from UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (now Rutgers, RWJMS).  He completed post-graduate residency program in family medicine and subsequently served as clinical director and faculty attending physician at Cabarrus Family Medicine Residency Program in North Carolina.   About Cellectar Biosciences, Inc. Cellectar Biosciences is developing phospholipid drug conjugates (PDCs) designed to provide cancer-targeted delivery of diverse oncologic payloads to a broad range of cancers and cancer stem cells. Cellectar's PDC platform is based on the company's proprietary phospholipid ether analogs. These novel small-molecules have demonstrated highly selective uptake and retention in a broad range of cancers. Cellectar's PDC pipeline includes product candidates for cancer therapy and cancer diagnostic imaging. The company's lead therapeutic PDC, CLR 131, utilizes iodine-131, a cytotoxic radioisotope, as its payload. CLR 131 is currently being evaluated under an orphan drug designated Phase I clinical study in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, as well as a Phase II clinical study to assess efficacy in a range of B-cell malignancies. The company is also developing PDCs for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics such as paclitaxel (CLR 1603-PTX), a preclinical-stage product candidate, and plans to expand its PDC chemotherapeutic pipeline through both in-house and collaborative R&D efforts. For more information please visit www.cellectar.com. This news release contains forward-looking statements. You can identify these statements by our use of words such as "may," "expect," "believe," "anticipate," "intend," "could," "estimate," "continue," "plans," or their negatives or cognates. These statements are only estimates and predictions and are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that may cause actual future experience and results to differ materially from the statements made. These statements are based on our current beliefs and expectations as to such future outcomes. Drug discovery and development involve a high degree of risk. Factors that might cause such a material difference include, among others, uncertainties related to the ability to raise additional capital, uncertainties related to the ability to attract and retain partners for our technologies, the identification of lead compounds, the successful preclinical development thereof, the completion of clinical trials, the FDA review process and other government regulation, our pharmaceutical collaborators' ability to successfully develop and commercialize drug candidates, competition from other pharmaceutical companies, product pricing and third-party reimbursement. A complete description of risks and uncertainties related to our business is contained in our periodic reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission including our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016. These forward-looking statements are made only as of the date hereof, and we disclaim any obligation to update any such forward-looking statements.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In recent years, research into the myriad complexities of the brain and neurophysiology has gained momentum at NJIT across diverse disciplines, including biology, biomedical engineering, mathematical sciences and computing. With the formal inauguration of the university's Institute for Brain and Neuroscience Research (IBNR) in March, the efforts of NJIT researchers to increase basic understanding of the brain that could lead to new healing therapies for related injuries and disease will be more sharply focused and closely coordinated. As the primary home for all neuroscience initiatives at NJIT, the IBNR will serve as an umbrella and organizing framework for collaborative research and training in areas ranging from brain injury, to neural engineering, to neurobiology, to computational neuroscience. Researchers will investigate, for example, how specific behaviors are generated in the nervous system, the mathematical modeling of neural patterns in bacteria, animals and humans, and innovations in brain imaging and neurorehabilitation, among others. In opening remarks at the IBNR inauguration ceremony held in the Campus Center, NJIT President Joel Bloom offered a succinct summary of the new institute's working environment: "Very talented people working in teams across disciplines to solve very challenging problems." This perspective was similarly reiterated by NJIT Provost Fadi Deek, Professor of Biomedical Engineering Namas Chandra and Professor of Neurobiology Farzan Nadim. Chandra and Nadim, both distinguished researchers, are co-directors of the IBNR. As Chandra and Nadim emphasized, the IBNR will not only promote leading-edge integrative research but will also engage students at every level in this research. Chandra said, "We are beginning to unravel some of the greatest mysteries of the brain. But this can only happen if knowledgeable people in many disciplines come together and speak the same language - the language of neuroscience. NJIT is providing the structure critical for making this happen." Nadim added, "The IBNR puts us in the position of having a truly interdisciplinary program in the neurosciences at NJIT. Involving undergraduate and graduate students in the work of the institute will clearly reinforce how interdisciplinary collaboration is fundamental to meeting the challenges we propose to approach, which include acquiring more comprehensive knowledge of the normal brain so that we can understand what's wrong with respect to diseases and disorders." Provost Deek said that the IBNR sets a high bar for research and education at the university, not only in terms of successful scientific investigation but also to the extent that it succeeds in valuing participation by junior as well as senior faculty, and by an increasing presence of women and minorities historically underrepresented in such leading-edge initiatives. Referencing the university's current strategic plan, 2020 Vision, Deek said that the IBNR is "how the university will look in 2020." "Establishing the IBNR is a milestone of superb collaborative synergy among faculty, staff and students," said Atam Dhawan, NJIT's vice provost for research, in his welcoming remarks. At NJIT, as Dhawan explained, this synergy integrates numerous related efforts across disciplines and research centers. It will also make the IBNR a focal point for collaboration with a wide range of other institutions and funding organizations. Cooperation in working toward common goals in brain and neuroscience research already involves Rutgers University-Newark, Rutgers Biomedical Health System, part of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, the Brain Health Institute at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and the Kessler Foundation. The National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Kessler Foundation are among the organizations providing funding for research currently underway. The audience of some 200 gathered for the formal inauguration of the IBNR, which included brief presentations of research by faculty and students and a tour of campus research facilities, reflected the inclusive outreach of the IBNR initiative. Commenting on the perspective of his own institution, Sussex County Community College President Jon Connolly said that a key goal at his school is to provide students who want to eventually attend NJIT with the physical resources and solid grounding in the STEM disciplines relevant to successful participation in research such as that going forward at the IBNR. The keynote address at the inauguration was given by Colonel Sidney R. Hinds II, M.D., U.S. Army. Currently, he is the coordinator for the Brain Health Research Program for the Department of Defense (DoD) Blast Injury Research Program Coordinating Office and medical advisor to the principal assistant for research and technology, Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland. He has also served as the national director for the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center. While a critical DoD research priority is traumatic brain injury (TBI) related to the combat experience of U.S. military personnel, Hinds said that the scope of this effort is also far more inclusive. Citing the incidence of brain injuries in the national population -- some 1.7 million reported annually with 52,000 deaths -- he said that DoD programs and collaborations in this area promise to benefit not only those serving in all branches of our military but also the general U.S. population and the people of other countries. Accordingly, the DoD is working with a wide range of academic institutions and research organizations to investigate the "full continuum of brain trauma and how that trauma occurs." "We do have state-of-the-art science and critical care but we need to standardize our approach and better utilize what we know. We want to go from good to great," Hinds said. Going from "good to great," he explained will require comprehensive investigation of what he termed the "neurotoxic cascade" of brain injuries -- the nuanced, complex impacts on the anatomy of the brain and our neurophysiology. This includes gaining a more comprehensive understanding of the unique challenges presented by mild, or concussive, TBI, which are the majority of such injuries. Collaboration will be the key to progress in acquiring new basic knowledge and improving care for the injured, Hinds said. "It is not going to be one organization, not one individual, not one lab but a very multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary approach that will move the field forward toward better understanding of the brain, especially with respect to brain injury." Commenting specifically on the establishment of the IBNR, Hinds spoke of how it will build on research that NJIT is already doing in collaboration with the DoD and other groups. He characterized the IBNR as a place where "geographically disparate, perhaps mission-disparate, organizations can be brought together to best utilize available resources to answer critical questions about traumatic brain injury and neuroscience." Under the leadership of Directors Chandra and Nadim, Hinds said, the IBNR will be a place where "shared experiences, shared resources and shared research" can be strategically focused on identifying critical gaps in our knowledge and then prioritizing and initiating efforts that can fill those gaps. One of the nation's leading public technological universities, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is a top-tier research university that prepares students to become leaders in the technology-dependent economy of the 21st century. NJIT's multidisciplinary curriculum and computing-intensive approach to education provide technological proficiency, business acumen and leadership skills. With an enrollment of 11,400 graduate and undergraduate students, NJIT offers small-campus intimacy with the resources of a major public research university. NJIT is a global leader in such fields as solar research, nanotechnology, resilient design, tissue engineering, and cybersecurity, in addition to others. NJIT is among the top U.S. polytechnic public universities in research expenditures, exceeding $130 million, and is among the top 1 percent of public colleges and universities in return on educational investment, according to PayScale.com. NJIT has a $1.74 billion annual economic impact on the State of New Jersey.


"Rutgers iJOBS is excited to have biomedical graduate students and postdoctoral fellows completing the Board Certification in Medical Affairs Specialist program.  iJOBS is funded by the NIH Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) initiative with the goal of exposing PhD students and postdocs to careers outside of academia so they can make informed decisions about their futures.  Many of our iJOBS trainees have expressed interest in a career in Medical Affairs within the pharmaceutical industry and the BCMAS program is a systematic mechanism for training scientific and clinical professionals in the topics related to this field.  By providing them exposure to areas they will be focused once they land a role, the BCMAS program helps them hit the ground running more effectively providing them with a competitive advantage,"said Dr. Janet Alder, Assistant Dean for Graduate Academic and Student Affairs, Rutgers University - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School "We are excited to be working with Rutgers being able to provide students and postdocs with exposure to alternative career options in the pharmaceutical industry," said Dr. William A. Soliman, chair and founder of the ACMA.  "Many MD, PharmD, and PhD students and post-docs are not aware of roles such as the medical science liaison, medical information, or medical director, where the training and skills they have acquired can open new career possibilities within the pharmaceutical industry." The BCMAS program is a self paced, online program providing the most comprehensive training within medical affairs. To be eligible for the program, candidates must hold a PhD, MD, PharmD, or DO or must be currently enrolled in an accredited doctoral program which grants these degrees. A passing score on the board examination is necessary to become board certified. The Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs (ACMA) is a self-governing entity whose mission is to establish, certify, and maintain the competencies of qualified medical and scientific professionals who have a focus in Medical Affairs within the pharmaceutical & biotechnology industries. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-board-certified-medical-affairs-specialist-program-bcmas-comes-to-rutgers-university-providing-a-new-path-forward-for-scientific-and-clinical-professionals-looking-to-work-within-the-pharmaceutical-industry-300447181.html


BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--MetaStat, Inc. (OTCQB:MTST), a pre-commercial biotechnology company focused on the development and commercialization of companion diagnostics and anti-metastatic therapeutics in the novel cancer treatments in drugs, today announced the promotion of Jerome B. Zeldis, M.D., Ph.D. from Vice Chairman to Chairman and the appointment of Douglas A. Hamilton, MetaStat’s President and Chief Executive Officer, to its board of directors in connection with a restructuring of MetaStat’s board. Dr. Zeldis stated, “MetaStat has an exciting technology platform based on the novel mechanisms that drive cancer metastasis and overcome tumor resistance to certain therapeutics, creating the potential to discover novel cancer drugs. I look forward to working with Doug and the MetaStat team in solidifying our mission to discover and develop truly novel approaches for treating a variety of cancers.” Mr. Hamilton said, “I am delighted Jerry is leading MetaStat’s Board of Directors and honored to serve on the board with him. We have a shared vision for the future of the Company, seeing multiple opportunities to make significant advances in treating cancer.” Mr. Hamilton continued, “Our driver-based diagnostic biomarkers are also therapeutic targets for the development of anti-metastatic drugs and combination therapies to overcome drug resistance. We plan to leverage our driver-based biomarkers and expand strategic partnerships to unlock opportunities in oncology.” Please see the company’s current report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 8, 2017 for full details on the board restructuring, including the resignations of Messrs. Berman, Goodeve and Bronsther. Dr. Zeldis is the Chief Medical Officer of Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc., and previously served as Chief Medical Officer of Celgene Corporation and Chief Executive Officer of Celgene Global Health until June 2016. Prior to joining Celgene in 1997, Dr. Zeldis held positions at Sandoz Research Institute and Janssen Research Institute in both clinical research and medical affairs. He currently serves as Chairman of the board of Alliqua and Trek Therapeutics, in addition to board positions at PTC Therapeutics and Soligenix. He was Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Associate Professor of Medicine at University of California, Davis, Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Cornell Medical School, and Professor of Clinical Medicine at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Zeldis received BA and MS degrees from Brown University, and M Phil, MD, and PhD degrees from Yale University. Dr. Zeldis has published 122 peer-reviewed articles and is a named inventor on 43 U.S. patents. Mr. Hamilton has been President and CEO of MetaStat since June 2015. Previously, Mr. Hamilton served as CFO for SEA Medical Systems and since 2007, Partner at New Biology Ventures, a life-sciences incubator accelerator and consulting firm. From 1999 to 2006, Mr. Hamilton served as CFO and COO for Javelin Pharmaceuticals, purchased by Hospira, where he led the company to commercialization and through its successful national markets up-listing. Prior to Javelin, Mr. Hamilton was the CFO and Director of Business Development for PolaRx Biopharmaceuticals (now Teva Pharmaceuticals). Mr. Hamilton held positions at Amgen and Pfizer in clinical research and product development, sales and marketing at Pharmacia Biotechnology (now GE Healthcare Life Sciences), and research at Connaught Laboratories (now Sanofi-Pasteur). Mr. Hamilton earned his honors Bachelor of Science degree from the Department of Medical Genetics at the University of Toronto and his MBA from the Ivey Business School at Western University. MetaStat is a pre-commercial biotechnology company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of diagnostics tests that are prognostic for risk of cancer metastasis, companion diagnostics to predict drug response and therapeutics to prevent aggressive cancer from spreading. MetaStat’s driver-based diagnostic and therapeutic discovery platform technology is based on the pivotal role of the Mena protein and its isoforms, a common pathway for the development of metastatic disease and drug resistance in all epithelial-based solid tumors. MetaStat is based in Boston, MA. This press release contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You are cautioned that such statements are subject to a multitude of risks and uncertainties that could cause future circumstances, events or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of various factors and other risks, including those set forth in the company's Form 10-K and its other filings filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. You should consider these factors in evaluating the forward-looking statements included herein, and not place undue reliance on such statements. The forward-looking statements in this release are made as of the date hereof and the company undertakes no obligation to update such statements.

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