Salem, VA, United States
Salem, VA, United States

Roanoke College is a private, coeducational, four-year liberal-arts college located in Salem, Virginia, United States, a suburban independent city adjacent to Roanoke, Virginia.Roanoke has approximately 2,000 students who represent approximately 40 states and 25 countries. The college offers 35 majors, 57 minors and concentrations, and pre-professional programs in dentistry, engineering, law, medicine, ministry, nursing, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. Roanoke awards bachelor's degrees in arts, science, and business administration and is one of 280 colleges with a chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa honor society.Roanoke is an NCAA Division III school competing in the Old Dominion Athletic Conference. The college fields varsity teams in nine men's and ten women's sports. Roanoke's athletic nickname is Maroons and the mascot is Rooney, a maroon-tailed hawk.Roanoke is ranked 2nd on the 2014 U.S. News and World Report list of Up-and-Coming National Liberal Arts Colleges. The Princeton Review, in its 2014 "Best 378 Colleges" guide, ranks Roanoke in the top ten percent of all colleges and universities nationwide; the 2012 edition ranked Roanoke's campus as the 18th most beautiful in the nation. Wikipedia.


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Julia Ross of Fairfax Station is Featured Speaker at the National Association for College Admissions Counseling (NACAC) Conference Julia Ross, local college admissions expert and author, was a featured speaker at the annual NACAC conference of over 6,000 attendees on September 23rd, 2016 in Columbus, OH. Ms. Ross, along with Dr. Brenda Poggendorf, Vice President of Roanoke College, lectured on the links between targeted recruitment and student retention at colleges and universities. Fairfax Station, VA, December 07, 2016 --( Ross’s speech was enthusiastically received and she was invited to travel both nationally and internationally to meet with university professionals. She plans to attend a conference at St. Andrew’s University in Scotland this winter. Ross, among the foremost educational consultants in the United States, established the wildly successful Professional Tutoring, LLC, in 1994. Since that time Professional Tutoring has served thousands of families, helping students apply for and earn millions of dollars in merit scholarships and financial aid. Her greatest asset is in her innate ability to reach the kids on their own level – a true “kid whisperer.” She is available to consult with individuals, high schools, education professionals, and community groups. Ross holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Virginia. She has authored two books, Getting into College with Julia Ross: Finding the Right Fit and Making it Happen and Conquering the SAT Reasoning Exam with Julia Ross– currently in update for the r-SAT and new ACT Exams. Her books are available on Amazon. Ross is fluent in English, Spanish and French. She is the mother of three. The Ross family has hosted more than 26 foster children and medical exchange students from eleven countries. Fairfax Station, VA, December 07, 2016 --( PR.com )-- In the presentation, Ross emphasized that the myriad of college choices overwhelms students and their families, particularly first-generation college students. Ross urged admissions officers to look deeper than statistics to identify well-suited students for their universities. Ross’ experience with thousands of colleges, universities and students has given her firsthand experience and data on college admission, retention and graduation success. Ross has successfully placed thousands of students and boasts that fewer than 1% of her business’s students transfer or drop out of college.Ross’s speech was enthusiastically received and she was invited to travel both nationally and internationally to meet with university professionals. She plans to attend a conference at St. Andrew’s University in Scotland this winter.Ross, among the foremost educational consultants in the United States, established the wildly successful Professional Tutoring, LLC, in 1994. Since that time Professional Tutoring has served thousands of families, helping students apply for and earn millions of dollars in merit scholarships and financial aid. Her greatest asset is in her innate ability to reach the kids on their own level – a true “kid whisperer.” She is available to consult with individuals, high schools, education professionals, and community groups.Ross holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Virginia. She has authored two books, Getting into College with Julia Ross: Finding the Right Fit and Making it Happen and Conquering the SAT Reasoning Exam with Julia Ross– currently in update for the r-SAT and new ACT Exams. Her books are available on Amazon.Ross is fluent in English, Spanish and French. She is the mother of three. The Ross family has hosted more than 26 foster children and medical exchange students from eleven countries.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Sheraton Roanoke Hotel & Conference Center welcomes groups and event planners to experience all that Sheraton has to offer this holiday season. With our special Take the Elevator Home package, groups will receive discounted pricing at $89 per night with one (1) complimentary upgrade per every twenty (20) room nights booked. Event planners looking to host their holiday celebration at the Sheraton will be able to pick up to two (2) perks, including: BOGO bartender or carving fee, holiday sweet favor for your guests or one (1) complimentary overnight stay for the event planner. A special bonus is available for planners looking to host their event on a weekday or in January. The bonus includes Triple SPG Event Planner Points, a complimentary two (2) night stay with breakfast for two (2) to raffle at the event and dinner for two (2) at Shula’s Restaurant for the event planner. Exclusions may apply and bookings must be made by November 18th, 2016. For inquiries, please contact our catering and sales department at (540) 561-7907 or autumn.bledsoe(at)sheratonroanoke(dot)com. The Sheraton Roanoke Hotel & Conference Center is located just minutes from Downtown Roanoke at the base of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. Guests enjoy easy access to Roanoke attractions like Virginia Tech, River’s Edge Sports Complex, Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke College, Valley View Mall and a variety of local shopping and dining. The hotel offers generous amenities such as free high-speed internet access, plush Sheraton Sweet Sleeper™ Beds, in-room free Starbucks® Coffee, a free airport shuttle to and from the Roanoke Airport (ROA), 17,000 sq. ft. of versatile meeting space ideal for weddings and special events and an in-house dining experience, Shula’s 347 Grill. At our hotel, Sheraton Club Members enjoy breakfast, afternoon appetizers and choice of beverages at no extra charge. For more information or to book, please visit http://www.sheratonroanoke.com. The Sheraton Roanoke Hotel & Conference Center is proudly managed by Stonebridge Companies in Denver, Colo. Founded in 1991 by Navin C. Dimond, Stonebridge Companies is a privately owned, innovative hotel owner, operator and developer headquartered near Denver. Its diverse listing of properties includes select-service, extended-stay, mid-scale and full-service hotels in markets throughout the U.S. For detailed information, visit our website at http://www.sbcos.com.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Of the more than 3 million people with breast cancer in the United Stated, about 10 percent carry an inherited mutation in their BRCA1 gene. In health, the gene is responsible for suppressing tumors. In disease, the gene goes terribly awry. Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute found that breast cancer cells can trigger the self-destruction of the tumor-suppressing BRCA1 proteins. They published their results today (5 a.m. Eastern Time, Tuesday, Feb. 28) in Scientific Reports, a Nature journal. "There are different ways in which DNA damage can be repaired. The breast cancer susceptibility protein, BRCA1, has an interesting mechanism as a tumor suppressor," said Deborah Kelly, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and senior author on the paper. "Unfortunately, where there are mutations in BRCA1, there's a significant decrease in its ability to repair DNA and cells are more likely to become cancerous." Scientists knew the mutations promoted cancer, but they didn't know exactly how BRCA1 physically changed, or how those changes prevented the protein from participating in DNA repair. Kelly and her team focused on a highly prevalent BRCA1 mutation to begin to understand not only the structural changes, but also the functional fallout. Using molecular imaging and biochemical tools, the researchers examined human cancer cells and found that mutated BRCA1 proteins were destroyed under stressful, oxidative cellular conditions. The proteins were unable to properly repair damaged DNA. "The system we use mimics the chain of events resulting from the inappropriate breakdown of estrogen, which produces molecules known as reactive oxygen species that can modify DNA and proteins, contributing to cancer," Kelly said. Healthy cells can manage the damage caused by reactive oxygen species, also called free radicals, with repair proteins. Kelly and her team saw that typical BRCA1 proteins remained relatively stable, but mutated BRCA1 proteins significantly reduced in number. Cells tag the mutated BRCA1 protein for destruction with a molecule called ubiquitin, according to Kelly. The cells then destroy the ubiquitin-tagged BRCA1 proteins, leading to a decrease in their ability to repair DNA lesions. Kelly and her team are not the first to identify ubiquitination, but they are the first to recognize that the process increases in response to the BRCA1 mutation. They suspect that the BRCA1 mutation causes a small misfolding that allows even more ubiquitin to attach to the protein. "Some ubiquitin modifications actually enhance the function of proteins, but, in this case, it acts as a target for degradation," said Kelly, who is also an assistant professor of biological sciences at Virginia Tech's College of Science. "Compared with non-mutated BRCA1 proteins, the ubiquitination process heightens the destruction of mutated BRCA1 proteins. The levels are lowered to a point where its power to assist in genomic maintenance is compromised." The process of ubiquitation is already a target for a potential therapeutic treatment, according to Kelly. It's theoretically possible for enzymes to block or remove the ubiquitin, allowing cells to potentially enhance or restore BRCA1's function as a tumor suppressor. "We demonstrated that protein levels, genetic mutations, and the chemical changes in proteins after they are made, known as post-translational modifications - particularly ubiquitination - can affect BRCA1's functional state in breast cancer cells," Kelly said. "Based on the results of this work, the next logical step is to test mechanistic-based therapies, such as enzymes that remove ubiquitin to restore the physical properties of the mutated BRCA1." Current experiments in the Kelly Lab involve determining the 3D structures of healthy and mutated BRCA1 using high resolution cryo-electron microscopy. This information may help scientists more fully understand the extent to which some individuals with BRCA1 mutations are more disposed to cancer than others, based on physical changes to the BRCA1 protein structure. Brian Gilmore and Yanping Liang, both research associates in Kelly's laboratory, are co-first authors on this paper. Carly Winton, a graduate research assistant who has since graduated with a master's degree from Virginia Tech's Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics; Vasiliea Karageorge, an undergraduate research assistant at Roanoke College; Kaya Patel, a research associate who now attends Tulane University School of Medicine; Cameron Varano, a third-year doctoral student in Virginia Tech's Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health graduate program; and William Dearnaley, a postdoctoral associate in Kelly's laboratory, contributed to the study. Zhi Sheng, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, advised on the cancer biology work and aided with the microscopy imaging. The research was supported by the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, the Commonwealth Health Research Board, the Concern Foundation, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and the UVA-VTC Neuroscience Seed Fund Award.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Winter Lacrosse Showcase Camp will have 4 full field, 10 vs 10 games, on field turf. College coaches will be coaching teams along with attending the event to scout and recruit players. There will also be an instructional practice session the on first day. Directing the Lacrosse Showcase Camps is Roanoke College Men's Lacrosse Coach, Bill Pilat. Coach Pilat states, “I am very excited to be hosting lacrosse prospects at the winter showcase camp at Roanoke College. Every winter, I enjoy working with these talented players and providing them with a platform to showcase their talents and helping to get them ready for the next level." Coach Pilat goes on to say, "We have a great line-up of schools that attend each year and this year will be no different." The following colleges were in attendance at the Winter Showcase in 2016 - Roanoke College, VA , University of Mary Washington, VA, Lebanon Valley College, PA, Guilford College, NC, Concordia University Chicago, IL, Depauw University, IN, Lynchburg College, VA, Ferrum College, VA, Pfeiffer College, NC, Ohio Wesleyan, OH, Randolph Macon College, VA, Randolph College, VA, Shenandoah College, VA, Hampden Sydney College, VA, Virginia Tech University, VA and Cornell College, IN. This Lacrosse Showcase camp will only enroll the first 144 Players who sign up. Campers and teams are encouraged to register early. For more information please visit http://www.ussportscamps.com/lacrosse or call 1-800-645-3226 About US Sports Camps US Sports Camps (USSC), headquartered in San Rafael, California, is America's largest sports camp network and the licensed operator of Nike Sports Camps. The company has offered camps since 1975 with the same mission that defines it today: to shape a lifelong enjoyment of athletics through high quality sports education and skill enhancement.


Roberts N.,University of South Carolina | Galluch P.S.,Roanoke College | Dinger M.,Henderson State University | Grover V.,Clemson University
MIS Quarterly: Management Information Systems | Year: 2012

Absorptive capacity is a firm's ability to identify, assimilate, transform, and apply valuable external knowledge. It is considered an imperative for business success. Modern information technologies perform a critical role in the development and maintenance of a firm's absorptive capacity. We provide an assessment of absorptive capacity in the information systems literature. IS scholars have used the absorptive capacity construct in diverse and often contradictory ways. Confusion surrounds how absorptive capacity should be conceptualized, its appropriate level of analysis, and how it can be measured. Our aim in reviewing this construct is to reduce such confusion by improving our understanding of absorptive capacity and guiding its effective use in IS research. We trace the evolution of the absorptive capacity construct in the broader organizational literature and pay special attention to its conceptualization, assumptions, and relationship to organizational learning. Following this, we investigate how absorptive capacity has been conceptualized, measured, and used in IS research. We also examine how absorptive capacity fits into distinct IS themes and facilitates understanding of various IS phenomena. Based on our analysis, we provide a framework through which IS researchers can more fully leverage the rich aspects of absorptive capacity when investigating the role of information technology in organizations.


Mihalache-O'keef A.,Roanoke College | Li Q.,Texas A&M University
International Studies Quarterly | Year: 2011

Food security is of great urgency in the developing world. Many countries have sought to attract foreign capital to promote development and reduce hunger. But how do foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows affect food security? Extant research based on dependency and modernization arguments or the globalization debate offers contradictory theoretical predictions and produces conflicting evidence. We resolve the puzzle by disaggregating FDI. Foreign investments in distinct economic sectors have disparate attributes, producing different welfare consequences for food security. We test our arguments using the food security indicators recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and new data on sector-specific FDI inflows to 56 developing and transition economies between 1981 and 2001. We find highly robust evidence that manufacturing FDI improves food security. We also find that primary-sector FDI reduces food security and that service-sector FDI has an ambiguous but sometimes negative effect. These results are largely robust under different statistical methods, additional control variables, and alternative measures of food security. Our research offers policy lessons for how to improve food security and demonstrates how to resolve theoretically the long-standing dependency-modernization controversy that has informed the contemporary debate between the pro- and anti-globalization camps. © 2011 International Studies Association.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

NEW BERN, NC, December 06, 2016-- Brooks Morris Whitehurst has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Recognized for an astounding six and a half decades of invaluable contributions to his field, Mr. Whitehurst has achieved much. After earning a Bachelor of Science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1951, he entered the professional realm in the role of senior process assistant of American Enka Corp., where he worked for five years. At that time, Mr. Whitehurst transferred to Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, where he stayed until 1963 as a senior process development engineer. After seven years with that company, Texaco utilized his skills as a project engineer for three years, and for almost a decade and a half after that, he became Texasgulf, Inc.'s manager of engineering services and then their manager of special projects and long range planning. Today, he parlays his extensive knowledge of the field into his role as president of Whitehurst Associates, where he has been since 1981.Registered as a professional engineer, Mr. Whitehurst recently earned an honorary Doctor of Science from Roanoke College and was named Honorary Director General of the International Biographical Center in 2010. In 2014, the International Biographical Center inducted Mr. Whitehuirst into its Engineering Hall of Fame in the Field of Chemicals, and in 2016, the Center presented him with The Sir Isaac Newton Legacy of Honour Award. Some of his other achievements include obtaining 30 patents in the field, working on biodegradable chelate systems, developing environmentally-friendly products for forest fertilization and chelates for organic agriculture, and developing coatings used on crops to prevent the loss of micronutrients such as manganese, boron and zinc. Mr. Whitehurst led the team that worked on that project, the account of which can be seen in, "Forest Ecology and Management." In the early '70s, he also led the team that produced ammonium polyphosphate, the base material for making liquid fertilizer, which is now used on a worldwide basis.A member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, National Society of Professional Engineers and the Royal Chemistry Society, Mr. Whitehurst has won many awards for his work, including a commendation from the President in 1981 and recognition in Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in Finance and Business, and Who's Who in the World. Looking toward the future, he intends to experience the continued growth and success of his career.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Ramesh M.A.,Roanoke College
Fungal Biology Reviews | Year: 2016

How can a new faculty member assigned to teach a course in fungal biology go about designing a course that is both informational and relevant to the 21st century undergraduate? Recent calls for science education reform recommend a shift to more active learning pedagogies that encourage students to learn by solving problems or being actively engaged in the process of experimentation as opposed to the traditional lecture reliant on content delivery. While a valid idea, practically, how can such a shift in instruction be implemented? Consider that most current faculty members were taught through the traditional lecture-laboratory format. While creativity and experience in the classroom enables us to develop as effective instructors, the reality of the demands on faculty rarely provide the time to develop enough novel instructional resources when constructing new courses. Fortunately, we can draw up educational resources to aid us beyond our own experiences via internet. Unfortunately, there is currently no central portal for fungal biology educational resources. While some professional societies and groups have begun to include educational resources, none are comprehensive. Because fungal biology topics have traditionally been taught as mycology or phytopathology or medical mycology, content tends to be partitioned to these specific disciplines. The goal of this review is to consolidate and evaluate teaching resources for fungal biology available through the internet for undergraduate education. This review will provide educators with ideas and tools to train future fungal biologists for 21st century careers. © 2016 British Mycological Society.


Brenzovich Jr. W.E.,Roanoke College
Angewandte Chemie - International Edition | Year: 2012

Fields of gold: Recent developments in the field of gold catalysis, using an alkyne as a carbonyl equivalent is becoming an important chemical transformation, thus providing flexibility in synthetic planning of complex and sensitive natural products. Understanding of the reaction and new catalyst designs are providing new conditions that are amenable for late-stage synthetic intermediates. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

SALEM, Va., Nov. 4, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton holds a 7 percentage point lead over Republican nominee Donald Trump among likely voters in Virginia (45%-38%), according to the latest Roanoke College Poll. Libertarian Gary Johnson trails with 5...

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