Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia

RMIT University is an Australian university of technology and design based in Melbourne, Victoria.RMIT was founded in 1887 by grazier, politician and public benefactor the Hon. Francis Ormond—as the Working Men's College of Melbourne. Its foundation campus is located in Melbourne City, and is a contiguous part of the northern area of the city centre.It opened as a night school for instruction in art, science and technology—to support the industrialisation of Melbourne during the 19th century. It had an initial enrollment of 320 students. As of 2013, it has an enrollment of around 82,000 students across vocational, undergraduate and postgraduate levels.In addition to its Melbourne City foundation campus, RMIT also has two radial campuses in the Melbourne metropolitan area—located in the northern suburbs of Bundoora and Brunswick; as well as training and research sites in the Melbourne metropolitan area and the Grampians state region—located in the western suburb of Point Cook and the town of Hamilton respectively. Outside Australia, it has two branch campuses in Asia—located in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi, Vietnam; and a coordinating centre in Europe—located in Barcelona, Spain.In 2013, according to the QS World University Rankings, RMIT was ranked the 291st university in the world. RMIT was also ranked among the top 51-100 universities in the world in the subjects of: accounting, communication and media studies, computer science and information systems. Wikipedia.

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Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2017-04-05

A process for the preparation of reduced graphene comprising the steps of: providing an expandable graphite intercalated with oxygen containing groups; heating the expandable graphite under conditions sufficient to cause expansion of the expandable graphite and formation of an expanded graphite comprising oxygen containing groups; and contacting the expanded graphite with carbon monoxide to reduce at least a portion of the oxygen containing groups and form a reduced expanded graphite comprising an array of reduced graphene. The process of the invention enables large volumes of high quality graphene to be produced.


Patent
RMIT University and Meat & Livestock Australia Ltd | Date: 2017-07-26

A gas permeable, liquid impermeable membrane for use with gas sensors in which the membrane consists of a film forming polymer which incorporates one or more nanoparticles selected to improve one or more of the following the permeability to gases, to selectively impede or exclude permeation by some gases while facilitating the passage of selected gases through the membrane, to inhibit microbial growth on the membrane. The membranes are useful in capsules adapted to be introduced into the stomach and Gl tract of a mammal which consists of a capsule shaped container consisting of a wall material capable of being bio compatible with the Gl tract and being adapted to protect the electronic and sensor devices contained in the capsule. The capsule contains gas composition sensors, pressure and temperature sensors, a micro controller, a power source and a wireless transmission device. The microprocessor is programmed to receive data signals from the sensors and convert the signals into gas composition and concentration data and temperature and pressure data suitable for transmission to an external computing device. The capsule wall incorporates gas permeable nano-composite membranes with embedded catalytic and nano void producing nanoparticles which enhance the operation, selectivity and sensitivity of the gas sensors. The nanoscomposite membranes also reduce the risk of microorganism colonization on the surface that increases the life time of the capsule.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2015-05-01

A process for the preparation of reduced graphene comprising the steps of: providing an expandable graphite intercalated with oxygen containing groups; heating the expandable graphite under conditions sufficient to cause expansion of the expandable graphite and formation of an expanded graphite comprising oxygen containing groups; and contacting the expanded graphite with carbon monoxide to reduce at least a portion of the oxygen containing groups and form a reduced expanded graphite comprising an array of reduced graphene. The process of the invention enables large volumes of high quality graphene to be produced.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2015-10-09

In general, techniques of this disclosure are directed to a sensor for measuring an external magnetic field. The sensor an optical cavity, a laser medium which together with the optical cavity has a laser threshold, a laser pump, and a radio-frequency (RF) drive applied to the laser medium, such that the laser threshold varies with a change in the external magnetic field. The RF drive may be applied to the laser medium at or around a particular resonance frequency which varies depending on the external magnetic field, such that depending on the value of the external magnetic field, the RF drive induces transitions between at least two states of the laser medium, each state causing a different laser threshold in an intensity of a laser output. Further, the intensity of the laser output may provide a measurement of the value of the external magnetic field.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2015-03-04

A method for producing a customised orthopaedic implant is provided. The method involves scanning a bone from which a diseased region of bone will be resected to obtain a three dimensional digital image of an unresected volume of bone; scanning the bone after a diseased region of bone has been resected to obtain a corresponding three dimensional digital image of a resected volume of bone; and comparing the three dimensional digital image of the unresected volume of bone to the corresponding three dimensional digital image of the resected volume of bone to estimate a volume of bone that has been resected. The estimate of the volume of bone that has been resected is used to design a customised orthopaedic implant that substantially corresponds to the configuration of the resected volume of bone, the implant being configured to substantially restore a biomechanical function of the bone. Finally the customised orthopaedic implant is manufactured and provided for insertion into the resected region of bone.


A chemical, biochemical or biological analysis system and method including: a surface acoustic wave (SAW) actuator (6) including a piezoelectric substrate (9) and at least one interdigital electrode (17) located on a working surface (11) of the piezoelectric substrate (9), the SAW actuator generating travelling SAWs in the working surface when an electrical signal is applied to the interdigital electrode; at least one reaction chamber (19) located on the working surface of the piezoelectric substrate; a light detector (16) for detecting luminescent, fluorescent or phosphorescent emissions within the reaction chamber; a reagent flow line (29) for providing a flow of reagent through the reaction chamber; a test sample supply line (29) for supplying a test sample to the reaction chamber; wherein the SAW actuator can generate travelling SAWs within the working surface to thereby induce chaotic micromixing, convective transport, concentration or combinations thereof of the test sample and the reagent contained within the reaction chamber.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2017-01-11

A method for producing a customised orthopaedic implant is provided. The method involves scanning a bone from which a diseased region of bone will be resected to obtain a three dimensional digital image of an unresected volume of bone; scanning the bone after a diseased region of bone has been resected to obtain a corresponding three dimensional digital image of a resected volume of bone; and comparing the three dimensional digital image of the unresected volume of bone to the corresponding three dimensional digital image of the resected volume of bone to estimate a volume of bone that has been resected. The estimate of the volume of bone that has been resected is used to design a customised orthopaedic implant that substantially corresponds to the configuration of the resected volume of bone, the implant being configured to substantially restore a biomechanical function of the bone. Finally the customised orthopaedic implant is manufactured and provided for insertion into the resected region of bone.


News Article | September 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researcher just one of three in world to be honoured RMIT University's Distinguished Professor Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh has been recognised as making the biggest impact in measurement science across the Asia-Pacific region in the last five years. Announced in the United States overnight, the inaugural Advances in Measurement Science Lectureship Awards recognise three individuals across the globe who have most significantly advanced the field. The awardees were chosen by the American Chemical Society based on the significant impacts of their recent works on the fields of sensors and analytical chemistry. In addition to the Asia-Pacific winner, the award is given to one person from the Americas, and one person from the Europe/Middle East/Africa region. Kalantar-zadeh, who is based in RMIT's School of Engineering in Melbourne, Australia, has been honoured for his impact on the field of sensors in recent years through a number of novel measurement sciences. Kalantar-zadeh and his group have developed ingestible "smart pills" which journey through and measures gas levels in the gastrointestinal tract. They demonstrated super-sensitive ultrathin sensors that are less than a few atoms thick, and have developed new plasmonic sensors for reaching the detection limit of single molecule. Additionally, they re-introduced the concept of physical absorption for selective and low-cost nitrogen oxides gas pollutant sensing. Kalantar-zadeh said: "The ingestible sensing capsules have the strong potential to revolutionise the prevention and diagnosis of gut disorders and diseases. "They have demonstrated several thousand times more sensitivity to gut gases than alternative techniques," he said. "Having access to these smart capsules, patients and the general population as a whole could do away with the need for painful and invasive treatments like colonoscopies for many diagnostic processes. "I hope to see ingestible sensors to become very common and accessible to all by 2024, and offer patients what they desperately need." It has also been predicted that such smart capsules will also generate a multi-billion dollar industry by then. The smart pills have successfully passed animal and phase I human trials and are now being prepared for phase II human trials. Kalantar-zadeh added: "This award belongs to the group and not me. These developments came from their dedication, intelligence and hard work." Kalantar-zadeh is also the recipient of the 2017 IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement Award in the field of sensors.


Spencer S.J.,RMIT University
Frontiers in Neuroscience | Year: 2013

Our early life nutritional environment can influence several aspects of physiology, including our propensity to become obese. There is now evidence to suggest perinatal diet can also independently influence development of our innate immune system. This review will address three not-necessarily-exclusive mechanisms by which perinatal nutrition can program neuroimmune function long-term: by predisposing the individual to obesity, by altering the gut microbiota, and by inducing epigenetic modifications that alter gene transcription throughout life. © 2013 Spencer.


Greaves T.L.,RMIT University | Drummond C.J.,RMIT University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2015

The thermal and physicochemical properties of protic ionic liquids (PILs) are reported. It is highly evident that there has been an extensive range of alkylammonium, imidazolium, and heterocyclic cations paired with many organic and inorganic anions that have been employed to prepare PILs. There has been strong interest in modifying the properties of PILs through the addition of water or other molecular solvents. For many applications, the presence of some water in the PILs is not detrimental, and instead leads to enhanced solvent properties such as lower viscosity, higher conductivities, and lower melting points. It remains an issue of definition though of how to refer to these resulting protic solutions. There is also an ongoing difficulty surrounding how to describe the proton activity in the PILs, analogous to pH in aqueous systems. For a broad range of applications, it has been reported that the acidity/basicity of the PIL or PIL-solvent system is crucial for their beneficial properties. It is expected that the fundamental properties of PILs will continue to be explored, along with continued interest in many existing and new applications, such as in electrochemistry, organic and inorganic synthesis, and biological applications. In particular, there has been a significant interest in a broad- range of PILs for use as electrolytes and incorporation in polymer electrolytes for fuel cells, and other energy storage devices.

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