Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia

RMIT University is an Australian university of technology and design based in Melbourne, Victoria.RMIT was founded in 1887 by grazier, politician and public benefactor the Hon. Francis Ormond—as the Working Men's College of Melbourne. Its foundation campus is located in Melbourne City, and is a contiguous part of the northern area of the city centre.It opened as a night school for instruction in art, science and technology—to support the industrialisation of Melbourne during the 19th century. It had an initial enrollment of 320 students. As of 2013, it has an enrollment of around 82,000 students across vocational, undergraduate and postgraduate levels.In addition to its Melbourne City foundation campus, RMIT also has two radial campuses in the Melbourne metropolitan area—located in the northern suburbs of Bundoora and Brunswick; as well as training and research sites in the Melbourne metropolitan area and the Grampians state region—located in the western suburb of Point Cook and the town of Hamilton respectively. Outside Australia, it has two branch campuses in Asia—located in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi, Vietnam; and a coordinating centre in Europe—located in Barcelona, Spain.In 2013, according to the QS World University Rankings, RMIT was ranked the 291st university in the world. RMIT was also ranked among the top 51-100 universities in the world in the subjects of: accounting, communication and media studies, computer science and information systems. Wikipedia.


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Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2015-03-04

A method for producing a customised orthopaedic implant is provided. The method involves scanning a bone from which a diseased region of bone will be resected to obtain a three dimensional digital image of an unresected volume of bone; scanning the bone after a diseased region of bone has been resected to obtain a corresponding three dimensional digital image of a resected volume of bone; and comparing the three dimensional digital image of the unresected volume of bone to the corresponding three dimensional digital image of the resected volume of bone to estimate a volume of bone that has been resected. The estimate of the volume of bone that has been resected is used to design a customised orthopaedic implant that substantially corresponds to the configuration of the resected volume of bone, the implant being configured to substantially restore a biomechanical function of the bone. Finally the customised orthopaedic implant is manufactured and provided for insertion into the resected region of bone.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2015-05-01

A process for the preparation of reduced graphene comprising the steps of: providing an expandable graphite intercalated with oxygen containing groups; heating the expandable graphite under conditions sufficient to cause expansion of the expandable graphite and formation of an expanded graphite comprising oxygen containing groups; and contacting the expanded graphite with carbon monoxide to reduce at least a portion of the oxygen containing groups and form a reduced expanded graphite comprising an array of reduced graphene. The process of the invention enables large volumes of high quality graphene to be produced.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2015-10-09

In general, techniques of this disclosure are directed to a sensor for measuring an external magnetic field. The sensor an optical cavity, a laser medium which together with the optical cavity has a laser threshold, a laser pump, and a radio-frequency (RF) drive applied to the laser medium, such that the laser threshold varies with a change in the external magnetic field. The RF drive may be applied to the laser medium at or around a particular resonance frequency which varies depending on the external magnetic field, such that depending on the value of the external magnetic field, the RF drive induces transitions between at least two states of the laser medium, each state causing a different laser threshold in an intensity of a laser output. Further, the intensity of the laser output may provide a measurement of the value of the external magnetic field.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Firearms safety is key for people who use weapons at work or for recreational shooting. But one risk has been little acknowledged: Lead dust exposure. In a standard bullet, a solid lead core wrapped in a copper jacket sits atop a stack of gunpowder and lead primer. When the gun fires, the primer ignites, the gunpowder lights, and some of the lead on the bullet boils. When the casing snaps out of the ejection port, lead particles trail behind it. As the bullet hurtles down the barrel of the gun, a shower of lead particles follows. If a gun range isn't ventilated well, lead dust collects on shooters' clothing and hands and lingers in the air, where it can be inhaled. The more people shoot, the greater the risk of being exposed to dangerous amounts of lead. It becomes an occupational hazard for weapons instructors, police and defense personnel. It can also put family members at risk. A 1-year-old boy in Connecticut was found to have high blood lead levels at a routine doctor's visit. There were no lead paint or pipes in the child's home. The exposure was traced to his father's job as a maintenance worker at an indoor shooting range; the father cared for his son after work in lead-contaminated clothing, according to a 2015 report from the state public health department. In order to reduce risk, the Department of Defense has lowered its blood lead standard to 20 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood, three times more restrictive than its previous standard, which relied on Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines. These OSHA guidelines apply to workers inside the United States, including employees of private firing ranges, but not to customers of those ranges. The DoD's new blood lead policy, in effect as of April, comes after a National Academy of Sciences report published in 2012 showing that defense personnel face significant health risks from lead from firing ranges, defense department spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel James Brindle told NPR. "DoD's subject matter experts in toxicology and occupational medicine used the Committee's report to propose the lower allowable blood lead level." The study also showed that people should expect negative health consequences at the blood lead standard set by OSHA. The OSHA standards for blood lead and exposure to lead have long been criticized as inadequate and dangerously outdated. "The current [Occupational Safety and Health Administration] standard hasn't been updated since the 1970s," says Dr. Elena Page, an occupational and environmental hazards physician at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. "It's widely acknowledged that the OSHA standard is not protective. They're clearly aware of that, and there's been a lot of pressure to change it." OSHA did not provide comments or interviews requested for this story. About 1 million law enforcement officers train on indoor ranges, according to the CDC, and there are 16,000 to 18,000 private indoor ranges in the U.S. Currently, the OSHA standards for lead exposure decree that employees must stop working if they have a blood lead level of 60 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood, and workers can return to the job if their blood lead level drops below 40 for two consecutive tests. But adverse effects on cardiovascular health, brain function and kidney function have been connected to blood lead levels as low as 5. "There's no amount of lead in your blood that's safe," Page says. The issue of lead exposure and firearms is divisive, even the question of whether higher lead levels are unsafe. "Well, that's their opinion," says Larry Keane, the vice president and general counsel for the National Shooting Sports Foundation. "We believe there are efforts by others that want to diminish people's participation in shooting sports or exercise their second amendment rights. They put out or advocate positions that are unsupported by the evidence." The need for a stricter lead standard is obvious, says Adam Finkel, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania and a former OSHA official. "OSHA is really letting people down," he says. "We're learning more about the neurologic effects of lead, and for whatever reason this substance has the capability of causing a whole spectrum of health effects at the OSHA standard that people don't appreciate." Many effects from lead can be subtle or nonspecific, says Mark Laidlaw, an environmental health scientist at RMIT University in Australia. "Memory and concentration problems, headache, abdominal pain, mood disorders – they can be attributed to a number of things unrelated to lead," he says. "You can have one of these health effects, but the shooters might not realize these are associated with their shooting. They just don't know they're being lead poisoned." At levels slightly higher than 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood, people may begin suffering spontaneous abortions or kidney dysfunction, according to the CDC. As the volume of lead in the body increases, the effects become more severe. "At levels of 10 or less, there's definitely evidence of increased incidence of tremor. Some are more cognitive effects," says Catherine Beaucham, an industrial hygienist at NIOSH and author of a 2014 report that found that most people with elevated blood levels were exposed from working at recreational firing ranges. "With acute lead poisoning, you can get wrist drop, nerve problems, abdominal pain. If it gets high enough, you can get a coma and death." Firing ranges can be particularly hazardous environments. Defense department ranges, private recreational firing ranges and law enforcement facilities have been found to be contaminated with high levels of lead, according to investigations by The Oregonian and Seattle Times in 2016 and 2014. Often, neglected or failing ventilation equipment was to blame. A review of lead exposure at shooting ranges that Laidlaw published last month found that nearly all participants in the 36 studies had blood lead levels above the 5 microgram ceiling recommended by the CDC; some had levels higher than 40. "You got to understand, the more bullets you shoot, the higher your blood lead level. The more visits you take to the range, then the higher your blood lead level." And when OSHA has inspected firing ranges in the last few decades, the agency has commonly found lead contamination violations. "It's about 30 years of sampling. They haven't done very many, but just a quick look shows about 350 air samples," Finkel says. About half of samples exceed the 50 microgram per cubic meter air level standard for workplaces, Finkel says, and some gun ranges had contamination levels]up to 24,100 micrograms per cubic meter of air. "So, it's terribly, terribly common, and [OSHA] finds overexposures even to their 40-year-old inadequate standard." The defense department's new blood lead limit of 20 does not go far enough, Laidlaw says. He thinks a better standard would be a maximum of 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood. "It is a step in the right direction, however the best way to deal with the problem is to eliminate lead from bullets and primers," he says. "I worry about the health of the young men and women in the military who are exposed to lead regularly while using firearms." The Defense department has a long-term goal of reducing employees' blood lead levels to below 10, Brindle says. "The DoD policy requires mandatory removal of the worker from workplace exposures when their blood lead level exceeds 20, and effectively will achieve the long-term average blood lead level to stay below 10," he writes to NPR in an email. But some within the industry say it's not necessary to abandon lead ammunition. "[Lead] is only a problem if [gun ranges] are not designed maintained properly," says Bill Provencher, the co-founder of Carey's Small Arms Range Ventilation in Tinley Park, Ill. "Even if OSHA standards are somewhat risky, a properly ventilated range has hardly detectible lead levels at 0.6 [micrograms per cubic meter of air.]" The most important thing aside from range ventilation, Provencher says, is to make sure that people are using safe practices like carefully washing their hands and clothes after shooting. "I would say [awareness] is going from not very good to good," he says. "The people I've met with really high lead levels, most of them did seriously silly things like working in the environment while drinking coffee. Ranges can be an unsafe place, but they can be perfectly safe places. There are people out there who are just hard headed and do silly things."


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Scaled Agile, Inc. (SAI), provider of SAFe®, the world’s leading framework for enterprise agility, today announced the induction of four new Fellows into the SAFe Fellow program: Mark Richards, Em Campbell-Pretty, Eric Willeke, and Harry Koehnemann, Ph.D. The SAFe Fellow achievement is Scaled Agile’s most prestigious distinction, recognizing individuals who have exhibited the highest level of mastery and thought leadership in the practice of SAFe. The four inductees have met the SAFe Fellow requirements based on their ongoing contribution to the evolution of the Framework, their demonstrated success in a broad range of implementations, and their willingness to share their expertise publicly through writing and speaking. “The SAFe Fellow program represents the ultimate achievement for those looking to advance Lean-Agile methods at enterprise scale with SAFe,” says Dean Leffingwell, creator of SAFe and Chief Methodologist. “If we are in a challenging situation—whether puzzling over the next generation framework or struggling to optimize a SAFe implementation—the Fellows are the folks we turn to.” Achieving SAFe Fellow status is a journey that requires years of practice and contribution. Prospective SAFe Fellows must be nominated by two existing Fellows, reviewed by all existing Fellows, and then finalized by the SAFe Fellow Nomination Committee. “With over 70 percent of US Fortune 100 enterprises adopting SAFe practices, and nearly 120,000 individuals trained and certified, the demand for high-level expertise and thought leadership has been enormous,” says Drew Jemilo, cofounder of Scaled Agile and SAFe Fellow Program Director. “The SAFe Fellow program is a key aspect of our enterprise enablement strategy, especially when it comes to supporting enterprises tackling highly complex and challenging implementations.” Scaled Agile is pleased to welcome the newest members of the program: —Mark Richards, SPCT, Partner, Context Matters Richards has been involved with SAFe since its inception, with a demonstrated commitment to remaining on the leading edge of the Agile Release Train (ART). He coached Australia’s first SAFe implementation at Telstra and has enabled successful implementations across the federal government, telecommunications, finance, insurance, and education industries. A prolific blogger (The Art of SAFe), Richards is also the developer of the widely used SAFe City simulation and has contributed to a number of areas of the Framework, most recently in the areas of metrics for SAFe and the ART Canvas in the SAFe Implementation Roadmap. —Em Campbell-Pretty, SPCT, Partner, Context Matters International speaker, avid blogger (prettyagile.com), and author of the book, "Tribal Unity," Campbell-Pretty has led transformations for public and private companies like RMIT University, Westpac, the Australian Taxation Office, ANZ, and Telstra, where she launched Australia’s first Agile Release Train. Her work has influenced the development of the Program Kanban system and fueled numerous SAFe case studies. —Eric Willeke, SPCT, Advisor, Enterprise Agility, CA Technologies A contributor to the Framework, Willeke has worked with a broad range of Fortune 500 companies, thousands of practitioners, and key leaders in the technology, media, insurance, financial services, and healthcare industries. His personal vision—to “help everybody on a project sleep better at night”—has shaped his passion for continuous improvement and unlocking human potential. Willeke has served on the program committee for the Agile 201x conference series and was the lead editor for the Proceedings of the Lean Software and Systems Conference (LSSC) series. —Harry Koehnemann, Ph.D., SPCT, Director of Technology, 321 Gang, Inc. Koehnemann helps organizations in the aerospace, defense, automotive, and medical industries adopt Lean-Agile methods and SAFe. He played a key role in the development of SAFe 4.0 for application to Lean systems engineering. More recently, Koehnemann worked with Scaled Agile on toolkits and white papers to provide practitioners with guidance on hardware and compliance concerns when adopting SAFe. Learn more about the SAFe Fellow program at scaledagile.com/safe-fellows. Based in Boulder, Colorado, Scaled Agile’s mission is to help system- and software-dependent enterprises achieve better outcomes, increase employee engagement, and improve business economics through adoption of Lean-Agile principles and practices based on the Scaled Agile Framework® (SAFe®). SAI supports over 120,000 practitioners of the Framework through training, certification, consulting services, and a global partner network that reaches over 35 countries and 350 cities. As a contributing member of the Pledge 1% corporate philanthropy movement, SAI also seeks to inspire, facilitate, and encourage other companies to make a positive impact in their community. Learn about Scaled Agile, and the Scaled Agile Framework, at scaledagile.com and scaledagileframework.com.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2017-04-05

A process for the preparation of reduced graphene comprising the steps of: providing an expandable graphite intercalated with oxygen containing groups; heating the expandable graphite under conditions sufficient to cause expansion of the expandable graphite and formation of an expanded graphite comprising oxygen containing groups; and contacting the expanded graphite with carbon monoxide to reduce at least a portion of the oxygen containing groups and form a reduced expanded graphite comprising an array of reduced graphene. The process of the invention enables large volumes of high quality graphene to be produced.


A chemical, biochemical or biological analysis system and method including: a surface acoustic wave (SAW) actuator (6) including a piezoelectric substrate (9) and at least one interdigital electrode (17) located on a working surface (11) of the piezoelectric substrate (9), the SAW actuator generating travelling SAWs in the working surface when an electrical signal is applied to the interdigital electrode; at least one reaction chamber (19) located on the working surface of the piezoelectric substrate; a light detector (16) for detecting luminescent, fluorescent or phosphorescent emissions within the reaction chamber; a reagent flow line (29) for providing a flow of reagent through the reaction chamber; a test sample supply line (29) for supplying a test sample to the reaction chamber; wherein the SAW actuator can generate travelling SAWs within the working surface to thereby induce chaotic micromixing, convective transport, concentration or combinations thereof of the test sample and the reagent contained within the reaction chamber.


Patent
RMIT University | Date: 2017-01-11

A method for producing a customised orthopaedic implant is provided. The method involves scanning a bone from which a diseased region of bone will be resected to obtain a three dimensional digital image of an unresected volume of bone; scanning the bone after a diseased region of bone has been resected to obtain a corresponding three dimensional digital image of a resected volume of bone; and comparing the three dimensional digital image of the unresected volume of bone to the corresponding three dimensional digital image of the resected volume of bone to estimate a volume of bone that has been resected. The estimate of the volume of bone that has been resected is used to design a customised orthopaedic implant that substantially corresponds to the configuration of the resected volume of bone, the implant being configured to substantially restore a biomechanical function of the bone. Finally the customised orthopaedic implant is manufactured and provided for insertion into the resected region of bone.


Patent
RMIT University and Meat & Livestock Australia Ltd | Date: 2017-07-26

A gas permeable, liquid impermeable membrane for use with gas sensors in which the membrane consists of a film forming polymer which incorporates one or more nanoparticles selected to improve one or more of the following the permeability to gases, to selectively impede or exclude permeation by some gases while facilitating the passage of selected gases through the membrane, to inhibit microbial growth on the membrane. The membranes are useful in capsules adapted to be introduced into the stomach and Gl tract of a mammal which consists of a capsule shaped container consisting of a wall material capable of being bio compatible with the Gl tract and being adapted to protect the electronic and sensor devices contained in the capsule. The capsule contains gas composition sensors, pressure and temperature sensors, a micro controller, a power source and a wireless transmission device. The microprocessor is programmed to receive data signals from the sensors and convert the signals into gas composition and concentration data and temperature and pressure data suitable for transmission to an external computing device. The capsule wall incorporates gas permeable nano-composite membranes with embedded catalytic and nano void producing nanoparticles which enhance the operation, selectivity and sensitivity of the gas sensors. The nanoscomposite membranes also reduce the risk of microorganism colonization on the surface that increases the life time of the capsule.


Greaves T.L.,RMIT University | Drummond C.J.,RMIT University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2015

The thermal and physicochemical properties of protic ionic liquids (PILs) are reported. It is highly evident that there has been an extensive range of alkylammonium, imidazolium, and heterocyclic cations paired with many organic and inorganic anions that have been employed to prepare PILs. There has been strong interest in modifying the properties of PILs through the addition of water or other molecular solvents. For many applications, the presence of some water in the PILs is not detrimental, and instead leads to enhanced solvent properties such as lower viscosity, higher conductivities, and lower melting points. It remains an issue of definition though of how to refer to these resulting protic solutions. There is also an ongoing difficulty surrounding how to describe the proton activity in the PILs, analogous to pH in aqueous systems. For a broad range of applications, it has been reported that the acidity/basicity of the PIL or PIL-solvent system is crucial for their beneficial properties. It is expected that the fundamental properties of PILs will continue to be explored, along with continued interest in many existing and new applications, such as in electrochemistry, organic and inorganic synthesis, and biological applications. In particular, there has been a significant interest in a broad- range of PILs for use as electrolytes and incorporation in polymer electrolytes for fuel cells, and other energy storage devices.

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