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« Energy companies partner with RMI and Grid Singularity to launch global blockchain initiative for energy | Main | Wrightspeed partners with AxleTech on heavy-duty electric drive » The Volkswagen Group has invested some €3 billion (US$3.3 billion) in alternative drive technologies over the past five years and will triple this amount in the course of the next five years, said Matthias Müller, CEO of Volkswagen AG, at the Group’s Annual General Meeting in Hanover. “The future is electric. We intend to be the Nº 1 in e-mobility by 2025,” said Müller at the meeting. At the same time, the Volkswagen Group is continuing to develop diesel and gasoline engines, targeting making them a further 10 to 15 percent more efficient and cleaner by 2020. “Diesel,” said Müller, “will remain indispensable for the foreseeable future.” In total, the Volkswagen Group will be investing around €10 billion (US$10.9 billion) in these technologies by 2022. The Volkswagen Group will introduce more than 10 new electrified models by the end of 2018, Müller said. By 2025, the Group will and more than 30 more BEVs.The newly-established Center of Excellence in Salzgitter will bundle Group-wide competence in battery cells and modules. At the same time, the Group is negotiating partnerships in the field of battery cells in Europe and China. Müller also highlighted how the realignment of the Group from an automaker into a globally leading mobility provider was gaining a foothold, citing further initiatives. A central element of the program for the future is partnerships to develop new business opportunities or advance new technologies. Müller referred to several examples such as the plans to enter the economy segment with Tata, the envisaged joint venture with JAC in China to develop attractively-priced electric cars, and numerous cooperation projects in the field of mobility services.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Praj cellulosic ethanol demo plant running in India; commercial projects coming | Main | Energy companies partner with RMI and Grid Singularity to launch global blockchain initiative for energy » Chemists from the US Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory and their collaborators have definitively identified the active sites of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO . The results, published in the journal Science, resolve a longstanding debate about exactly which catalytic components take part in the chemical reactions—and thus which should be the focus of efforts to boost performance. The hydrogenation of carbon dioxide is a key step in the production of methanol; catalysts made from copper (Cu) and zinc oxide (ZnO) on alumina supports are often used. There has been a debate over the actual active sites for the reaction on the catalyst. Different groups of scientists had proposed two different active sites for the catalyst—a portion of the system with just copper and zinc atoms, or a portion with copper zinc oxide. To determine which part of the molecular structure binds and breaks and makes bonds to convert reactants to product—and how it does that—co-author Jose Rodriguez performed a series of laboratory experiments using well-defined model catalysts, including one made of zinc nanoparticles supported on a copper surface, and another with zinc oxide nanoparticles on copper. To tell the two apart, he used an energetic x-ray beam to zap the samples, and measured the properties of electrons emitted. These electronic “signatures” contain information about the oxidation state of the atoms the electrons came from—whether zinc or zinc oxide. Meanwhile Liu, Jingguang Chen of Brookhaven Lab and Columbia University, and Shyam Kattel, the first author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow co-advised by Liu and Chen, used computational resources at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)—two DOE Office of Science User Facilities—to model how these two types of catalysts would engage in the CO -to-methanol transformations. These theoretical studies use calculations that take into account the basic principles of breaking and making chemical bonds, including the energy required, the electronic states of the atoms, and the reaction conditions, allowing scientists to derive the reaction rates and determine which catalyst will give the best rate of conversion. Those predictions matched what Rodriguez observed in the laboratory. All the sites participating in these reactions were copper zinc oxide. Optimizing the copper/zinc oxide interface will become the driving principal for designing a new catalyst, the scientists say. Rodriguez said that the team will try different configurations of the atoms at the copper/zinc oxide interface to see how that affects the reaction rate. Additionally, they will move from studying the model system to systems that would be more practical for use by industry. An essential tool for this next step will be Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), another Office of Science User Facility. NSLS-II produces extremely bright beams of x-rays—about 10,000 times brighter than the broad-beam laboratory x-ray source used in this study. Those intense x-ray beams will allow the scientists to take high-resolution snapshots that reveal both structural and chemical information about the catalyst, the reactants, and the chemical intermediates that form as the reaction occurs. An additional co-author, Pedro Ramírez of Universidad Central de Venezuela, made important contributions to this study by helping to test the activity of the copper zinc and copper zinc oxide catalysts. This research was supported by the DOE Office of Science.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from Rental Management Inc.: By Email Avon, CT, May 18, 2017 --( Solutions that are Certified for Microsoft Dynamics have demonstrated development quality and compatibility with the Microsoft Dynamics product on which it runs by passing rigorous VeriTest software solution testing for Microsoft Dynamics and are profiled in the Microsoft Partner Solution Profiler tool. In addition, the Microsoft Dynamics partner must have customers who are successfully using the certified solution and are willing to recommend it, be enrolled in a Partner Service Plan with Microsoft, and be a Gold Certified Partner in the Microsoft Partner Program. For customers, Certified for Microsoft Dynamics helps identify Microsoft Dynamics solutions that have been tested for compatibility, meet high quality standards, and are successfully used by existing customers. This certification represents a significant step in elevating the standard for partner-developed software solutions for industry-specific business applications. By highlighting these solutions, Microsoft also creates new opportunities for partners to expand their reseller channel and to better promote their packaged Microsoft Dynamics solution for customers. By requiring both the software solution and the partner to meet their highest standards, Microsoft is assuring customers that these certified solutions work with their investments in Microsoft Dynamics. Microsoft congratulates RMI on achieving the Certified for Microsoft Dynamics status for ADVANTAGE 365 by demonstrating its success and commitment in delivering a leading Microsoft Dynamics solution. About Microsoft Dynamics Microsoft Dynamics is a line of financial, customer-relationship and supply-chain management solutions that helps businesses work more effectively. Delivered through a network of channel partners providing specialized services, these integrated, adaptable business management solutions work like and with familiar Microsoft software to streamline processes across an entire business. About RMI Founded in 1983 and headquartered in Avon, CT, RMI Corporation is the leader in Enterprise Rental, Sales, and Service Solutions for mid-market companies. RMI offers an industry standard solution including software, implementation, training, consultation, and support to help their clients maximize efficiencies and reach their full business potential. For more information on the ADVANTAGE Solution and RMI Corporation, please visit their website at www.rmiusa.com. For Additional Information, press only: Phone: 860.677.1005 Fax: 860.677.2454 Email: Marketing@rmiusa.com Web: www.rmiusa.com The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. Avon, CT, May 18, 2017 --( PR.com )-- RMI announced today that its ADVANTAGE 365, full integrated mobile friendly solution, is now Certified for Microsoft Dynamics, which signifies that the solution has met Microsoft Corp.’s highest standard for partner-developed software. By successfully meeting all certification requirements, ADVANTAGE 365 can now carry the distinct Certified for Microsoft Dynamics logo.Solutions that are Certified for Microsoft Dynamics have demonstrated development quality and compatibility with the Microsoft Dynamics product on which it runs by passing rigorous VeriTest software solution testing for Microsoft Dynamics and are profiled in the Microsoft Partner Solution Profiler tool. In addition, the Microsoft Dynamics partner must have customers who are successfully using the certified solution and are willing to recommend it, be enrolled in a Partner Service Plan with Microsoft, and be a Gold Certified Partner in the Microsoft Partner Program.For customers, Certified for Microsoft Dynamics helps identify Microsoft Dynamics solutions that have been tested for compatibility, meet high quality standards, and are successfully used by existing customers. This certification represents a significant step in elevating the standard for partner-developed software solutions for industry-specific business applications. By highlighting these solutions, Microsoft also creates new opportunities for partners to expand their reseller channel and to better promote their packaged Microsoft Dynamics solution for customers.By requiring both the software solution and the partner to meet their highest standards, Microsoft is assuring customers that these certified solutions work with their investments in Microsoft Dynamics. Microsoft congratulates RMI on achieving the Certified for Microsoft Dynamics status for ADVANTAGE 365 by demonstrating its success and commitment in delivering a leading Microsoft Dynamics solution.About Microsoft DynamicsMicrosoft Dynamics is a line of financial, customer-relationship and supply-chain management solutions that helps businesses work more effectively. Delivered through a network of channel partners providing specialized services, these integrated, adaptable business management solutions work like and with familiar Microsoft software to streamline processes across an entire business.About RMIFounded in 1983 and headquartered in Avon, CT, RMI Corporation is the leader in Enterprise Rental, Sales, and Service Solutions for mid-market companies. RMI offers an industry standard solution including software, implementation, training, consultation, and support to help their clients maximize efficiencies and reach their full business potential. For more information on the ADVANTAGE Solution and RMI Corporation, please visit their website at www.rmiusa.com.For Additional Information, press only: Phone: 860.677.1005 Fax: 860.677.2454 Email: Marketing@rmiusa.com Web: www.rmiusa.comThe names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Rental Management Inc.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

Earlier this month Shell, Statoil, Tepco, Centrica and a half-dozen other energy companies joined the Energy Web Foundation, an alliance devoted to bringing blockchain to the grid. The companies donated $2.5 million to the organization. The foundation was set up in February this year as a collaboration between Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) and Austrian blockchain developer Grid Singularity to “accelerate the commercial deployment of blockchain technology in the energy sector.” The companies and organizations involved think blockchain will be a game-changer for energy, and are working together to provide the frameworks and standards to help ensure that outcome. Jesse Morris, principal for electricity and transportation practices at RMI and co-founder of the Energy Web Foundation (EWF), said the foundation's immediate aim is to garner more affiliates and funding, while developing an open-source blockchain application for use in the energy sector. Initially, partner organizations will evaluate the software, and potentially release it to the public in 2019 or 2020, if all goes well. Blockchain is best known as the platform for Bitcoin. It is an encrypted, distributed database that allows all users to track every transaction -- thus eliminating the need for an intermediary. Blockchain enthusiasts believe the technology can also be used to seamlessly transact electrons between consumers on the grid, while keeping an accurate, incorruptible tally of where they came from and where they went. It could encourage greater peer-to-peer sales on the grid and lay the foundation for microgrids and distributed renewables. “We have a strong hypothesis that blockchain will solve a lot of long-running problems in the energy sector,” said Morris. “Overcoming these challenges could make small, incremental changes to energy infrastructure and markets in the near term, while others would be more far-reaching and disruptive." Certificates (also known as guarantees) of origin would assure the user that a particular megawatt-hour of electricity was produced from renewables. According to Morris, the U.S. alone has 10 different tracking systems, Asia-Pacific has several more, and each European country has its own system of certification. Blockchain could be used to transparently guarantee the origin of the electrons. Longer-term, and more radically, RMI sees the future of electricity networks being driven by the billions of energy storage and HVAC units, EVs, solar roof panels and other devices and appliances at the grid edge. Blockchains can allow any of them to set their own level of participation on the grid, without the need for an intermediary. And crucially, they can be configured so that if a grid operator needs guaranteed capacity, the grid-edge unit can communicate back to the grid whether or not it’s up to the task. This is an example of what Morris described as blockchain’s ability to “fuse the physical with the virtual” via machine-to-machine communication. However, these are still early days. Foundation members have a lot of work to do in order to ensure its credibility, prove the technology works for energy applications, and lay down the foundation for widespread adoption. “Think of it like the App Store,” remarked David Peters, director of strategy and innovation at grid owner-operator Stedin B.V. “We at the EWF are building a shared infrastructure where we can build on top the developed code.” Stedin joined EWF because it believes in blockchain’s potential. “It gives us access to the best blockchain people in the world,” Peters said. He hopes the widespread adoption of the technology will “lower the barriers of participation” for the grid. Engie, the French multinational electric utility, had already conducted its own blockchain research projects before joining EWF. Among them was a program to track smart meters in Burgundy, keeping detailed tabs on solar panel electricity production, and facilitating transactions of a small peer-to-peer community energy trading project in Belgium. Engie's Director of Research and Technologies Raphael Schoentgen explained that blockchain is a promising technology to track smart meter data. “It contributes to better management of electrons over the grid,” he remarked. The technology’s ability to automate transactions for peer-to-peer trading is of key interest to Dr. Hans-Heinrich Kleuker, the CEO of Technische Werke Ludwigshafen, whose company is now also part of EWF. “We’ll see many more consumers with either an energy deficit or a surplus in the near future, and the desire to trade that energy,” he said. “Machine-to-machine communication, such as that offered via blockchain, will be essential to manage the vast number of transactions needed.” Such trades would certainly be beyond the capabilities of a small, local utility such as TWL, said Kleuker. “We are looking at the convergence of different electricity markets, which are very different right now, but longer-term will be facing similar challenges,” Kleuker concluded, convinced that the application of blockchain can meet those challenges. EWF will meet at the end of May to decide which use-case scenarios from around the world it will employ to take the project forward. In the coming years, the foundation will decide on norms and standards that may allow blockchain to be used in a truly universal way and “move beyond the hype.”


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

RMI has been attending the NPSA since its inception to showcase the RMI ADVANTAGE 365 Solution, the most comprehensive business management software for the container rental, sales, and service industry.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Let’s talk about the elephant in the room. We have entered a new, paradoxical political reality – one in which it is both more difficult, and more imperative, that large corporations step up and lead on sustainability and environmental policy. With a Trump administration that is quick to punish (or reward) a company with a simple tweet, many businesses have kept a low profile. While this may feel like a safe move in the current political climate, in the long run there is a much greater liability for companies that don’t make their voices heard in support of strong environmental safeguards. This liability is twofold: first, perception matters and your customers and key stakeholders will not reward complacency; second, without a seat at the policy table, you might just find yourself on the menu. Policy engagement is no longer an optional activity when it comes to environmental leadership and companies that truly want to be leaders need to push the envelope. Now is not the time to shirk on corporate sustainability, and the bar for leadership is higher than ever. It is no longer enough for a company to simply make incremental improvements within their own operations, leadership requires bold (and science-based) commitments that extend beyond a company’s four walls to drive impact throughout supply chains and up to the halls of Congress (perhaps even to the Oval Office). At the GreenBiz Conference in February, four leading environmental NGOs (EDF, WWF, Ceres and RMI) and Futerra came together to present a framework for corporate climate leadership. Companies today must demonstrate leadership by: Together these actions represent a powerful, and public commitment to a healthy environment and thriving economy. Companies don’t need to tackle these issues alone, our organizations stand ready to support businesses along their sustainability journey. Step up and join us. For every company, there is an action that fits your culture. Below are key actions that companies can start with to demonstrate leadership and build momentum for the solutions required to tackle climate change: 1.) Minimize the footprint of your operations and products: 4.) Build a better future by supporting critical policy efforts and investing in innovation: Additional resources to help you get started:


The company will be showcasing its RMI 400 inspection system for the poultry industry; FA3/M inline fat measurement and contaminant detection for meat; PACK 240x-ray for inline contaminant detection in packaged goods; Tall XSDV with conveyor for contaminants in rigid containers such as cans, bottles and jars at Interpack in Dusseldorf, Germany this week (May 4-10). Christy Draus, marketing manager, Eagle Product Inspection, told ConfectioneryNews, today’s consumers are not prepared to let quality and safety issues go unreported and any failure could be circulated via social media outlets in a matter of minutes. The cost of a product recall can have devastating effects, both in the short and long terms, and this continues to be a key area of focus for brands and retailers alike. “Some larger retailers are now insisting on x-ray systems as part of a supplier’s product inspection program, as they are aware of the high level of contaminant detection capability for materials such as metal, mineral stone, calcified bone, glass and some high density rubber and plastic compounds,” she said. “Investment in research and development will continue to be a vital part of our business and our systems and accompanying software will become ever more advanced as challenges are identified and overcome.” The Eagle Product Inspection, based in Tampa, Florida, evaluates finished products for contaminants such as metal, glass, stone and bone and analyze the fat content of meat, count components, check seal integrity, and measure mass and assess fill levels. “Interpack allows us to interact directly with our customers, and potential customers, and to demonstrate the benefits of x-ray technology in real time,” added Draus. “For those that have not used x-ray in the past, it can be seen to be a complicated area to get to grips with. By talking directly to one of our experts on the stand, this myth can be put to rest via live demonstrations and accurate data, leaving visitors with a clear vision of the benefits of x-ray over competitor technologies.”


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

Back in April 2015, Rocky Mountain Institute and partners including Global X and HOMER Energy published a study, The Economics of Load Defection, that examined how grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems will compete with traditional electric service. The findings showed that declining costs for such systems, combined with retail price hikes for grid electricity, would make grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems economically optimal for customers in many parts of the country by 2030. Furthermore, solar-plus-battery systems can offer other important benefits to customers, such as backup power for critical loads in the event of a grid outage and cost savings via peak-demand shaving and time-of-use shifting. However, at the time, RMI’s study did not detail the exact nature of energy storage costs. To break down the installed costs of PV-plus-storage systems today, RMI and NREL first analyzed data across a variety of existing studies from sources including Lazard and GTM, in addition to our own experience in the RMI Innovation Center.  One challenge to analyzing component costs and system prices for PV-plus-storage installations is choosing an appropriate metric. Unlike standalone PV, energy storage lacks a standard set of widely accepted benchmarking metrics, such as dollars-per-watt of installed capacity or levelized cost of energy. Energy storage costs can vary both by the total energy capacity of the system -- expressed in $/kilowatt-hour (kWh) -- and the rate at which it charges or discharges -- expressed in $/kilowatt (kW). Some consumers may prefer to optimize their system for longer-duration discharge, while others may have high peak demand and want to optimize their storage solution for power (kW) rather than energy capacity (kWh). Given the diversity of household preferences and load profiles, using a single metric can artificially distort reported costs, making it difficult to compare across varying systems. Therefore, we used the total installed price as our primary metric, rather than using a metric normalized to system size. To analyze component costs and system prices for PV-plus-storage installed in the first quarter of 2016, we adapted NREL’s component- and system-level bottom-up cost-modeling approach for standalone PV. Our methodology includes accounting for all component and project-development costs incurred when installing residential systems, and it models the cash purchase price for such systems, excluding the federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC). Applying these methods, we looked at two primary cases: one that we refer to as the small-battery (3 kW/6 kWh) case, and another that we refer to as the large-battery (5 kW/20 kWh) case. For each, we test sensitivities around two sets of alternatives: DC- or AC-coupling configurations, and retrofit or new installations. The distinction between DC and AC coupling determines whether the battery stores power directly from the PV panels or first converts it to AC power, which allows AC charging from both the PV panels and the grid. The small-battery case is designed for a typical customer’s self-consumption of electricity, including peak-demand shaving and time-of-use shifting, whereas the large-battery case is designed to support greater backup energy requirements for improved resiliency to outages. Here’s what we found: The benchmarked price of the small-battery case -- which uses a 5.6-kW solar PV array and a 3-kW/6-kWh lithium-ion battery -- is about twice as high as the price of a standalone grid-connected 5.6-kW solar PV system (see Figure 1). The DC-coupled system price ($27,703) is $1,865 lower than the AC-coupled system price ($29,568) for a new PV-plus-storage installation. The price premium for AC-coupled systems is mainly due to the hardware and labor costs associated with the additional grid-tied inverter required for AC coupling. However, installed price is not the only consideration when comparing AC- and DC-coupled systems: AC-coupled systems are more efficient in applications where PV energy is generally used at the time of generation, and DC-coupled systems tend to be more efficient in applications where PV energy is stored and used later. FIGURE 1: Modeled Total Installed Cost and Price Components for Residential PV-Plus-Storage Systems, Small-Battery Case (2016 U.S. Dollars) We also compared the small-battery case shown in the chart above with the large-battery case that’s designed to increase resiliency by providing longer periods of backup power during grid outages. The larger system uses a 5.6-kW solar PV array with a higher-capacity 5-kW/20-kWh lithium-ion battery (see Figure 2). The DC-coupled price of this resiliency system is $45,237, which is 63 percent more than the DC-coupled price of the small-battery system. With AC coupling, the price of the resiliency system is $47,171, which is 60 percent more than the price of the small-battery system. But in exchange for the increased cost of the larger system, a household could potentially cover critical loads for roughly four times longer than with the small system, other things being equal. FIGURE 2: Modeled Total Installed Cost and Price Components for Residential PV-Plus-Storage Systems, Small-Battery Case vs. Large-Battery Case (2016 U.S. dollars) The component-level breakdown shows that hardware costs constitute just half the total price of the small-battery system and roughly 60 percent of the large-battery resiliency system. And the rest of the costs depend on where the system is installed: locality-specific costs and processes like permitting, interconnection, net metering, and fire codes can vary widely, affecting not only project costs but project timelines as well. Some of the biggest variables affecting the financial viability of grid-connected solar-plus-storage projects are the local utility rates, incentives and ancillary benefit valuations. Often, the utility rate structure (e.g., whether it uses peak-demand pricing, time-of-use rates, and the like) is the primary factor determining the financial viability of adding storage to a PV system. While PV-plus-storage system costs continue to decline, they still remain relatively high for many residential uses on account of soft costs related to permitting and regulatory barriers. However, as utilities and permitting jurisdictions gain familiarity with residential storage systems, we anticipate that the residential storage market will grow at an increasing rate in the U.S. The work presented in this paper is an important step to help technology manufacturers, installers, and other stakeholders identify cost-reduction opportunities while also informing decision-makers about regulatory, policy and market characteristics that impede solar-plus-storage deployment. Technology costs are changing rapidly, and this cost benchmarking lays the foundation for ongoing tracking of improvements in real-world systems. Kristen Ardani is a solar program lead for solar soft costs and tech to market at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); David Labrador is a writer and editor at RMI; Chris McClurg is a Senior Associate with RMI’s Building’s Practice. This piece was originally published at RMI's Outlet and was reprinted with permission.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from Rental Management Inc.: By Email RMI ADVANTAGE 365 to be Showcased at NPSA Conference & Tradeshow RMI has been attending the NPSA since its inception to showcase the RMI ADVANTAGE 365 Solution, the most comprehensive business management software for the container rental, sales, and service industry. Las Vegas, NV, April 25, 2017 --( RMI has been attending the NPSA since its inception to showcase the RMI ADVANTAGE 365 Solution, the most comprehensive business management software for the container rental, sales, and service industry. Built on Office 365, this robust business system is Cloud-based and accessible from any internet-connected device. That means having access to: container availability calendars while on the road, real-time reports in the office, and all other business information from a desktop or mobile device. With all these features as well as its integrated Customer Portal, it’s a must-see in Booth 313. “Trade shows, specifically the NPSA, are really great places to showcase our system. We’re surrounded by experts in their field who can really appreciate the industry knowledge that we’ve built our system around,” says Paul Chapdelaine, President and founder of RMI. “It’s a valuable experience for our team too, not to mention a nice chance to see Vegas!” This year’s NPSA conference promises to be yet another successful and industrious show to look forward to. About RMI Corporation: Founded in 1983 and headquartered in Avon, CT, RMI Corporation offers a container industry software solution that’s all inclusive: software, implementation, training, consultation, support, and so much more to help clients maximize efficiencies and reach their full business potential. For more information on the ADVANTAGE Solution and RMI Corporation, please visit their website at www.rmiusa.com. For Additional Information: Phone: 860.677.1005 Fax: 860.677.2454 Email: Marketing@rmiusa.com Web: www.rmiusa.com Las Vegas, NV, April 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- After a successful debut of the new version last year, RMI is bringing ADVANTAGE 365 back to the 2017 NPSA in Las Vegas.RMI has been attending the NPSA since its inception to showcase the RMI ADVANTAGE 365 Solution, the most comprehensive business management software for the container rental, sales, and service industry.Built on Office 365, this robust business system is Cloud-based and accessible from any internet-connected device. That means having access to: container availability calendars while on the road, real-time reports in the office, and all other business information from a desktop or mobile device.With all these features as well as its integrated Customer Portal, it’s a must-see in Booth 313.“Trade shows, specifically the NPSA, are really great places to showcase our system. We’re surrounded by experts in their field who can really appreciate the industry knowledge that we’ve built our system around,” says Paul Chapdelaine, President and founder of RMI. “It’s a valuable experience for our team too, not to mention a nice chance to see Vegas!”This year’s NPSA conference promises to be yet another successful and industrious show to look forward to.About RMI Corporation:Founded in 1983 and headquartered in Avon, CT, RMI Corporation offers a container industry software solution that’s all inclusive: software, implementation, training, consultation, support, and so much more to help clients maximize efficiencies and reach their full business potential. For more information on the ADVANTAGE Solution and RMI Corporation, please visit their website at www.rmiusa.com.For Additional Information:Phone: 860.677.1005Fax: 860.677.2454Email: Marketing@rmiusa.comWeb: www.rmiusa.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Rental Management Inc.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Something very odd is happening in the U.S. energy system, and hardly anyone has noticed. To make a dollar of real GDP in 2016, the U.S. used 65% less oil than in 1975 (despite 26 years’ stagnation in new autos’ efficiency), 65% less directly used natural gas (direct fuel or feedstock, not power-plant fuel), and 56% less total primary energy. Yet electric intensity—total electricity consumed per dollar of real GDP—fell by only 29%. That’s less than half the percentage savings in oil or gas, the economy’s main direct fuels (since 93% of U.S. coal is burned to make electricity). So why is electric intensity going down only half as fast as total energy intensity, especially fuel intensity? The answer to this riddle is complex but important. It’s not about price or potential Slower electricity savings aren’t due to relative prices. Producing electricity takes huge capital investments; generating power from fuel loses about two-thirds of its energy; and the grid loses another 5½%. For these three reasons, electricity is even costlier than oil. Its 2016 average U.S. retail price is equivalent in heat content (without counting relative efficiency of use) to crude oil at more than four times the average world price. Thus cutting electric intensity would seem to have a strong financial incentive—yet it lags far behind. Nor is the cost-effective potential to save energy smaller for electricity than for oil and gas: their potentials are at least comparable. Some engineers miss this point by noting that, say, three-fifths of electricity runs motors, mostly big ones that are already around 90% efficient. But in fact, the way those motors are specified and used cuts their typical operating efficiency by at least half. Even bigger losses arise down­stream in the equipment motors drive, such as inefficient air-conditioners cooling inefficient buildings, or inefficient pumps whose effort (in pumping loops) is roughly 90% wasted on needless pipe friction. The biggest unseen part of these opportunities is in whole-system design: e.g. the most efficient new and retrofit U.S. office buildings were over twice as efficient in 2015 as they were in 2010, using the same technologies but more intelligently choosing and combining them. During 1986–92, my team at Rocky Mountain Institute conducted a uniquely detailed assessment of potential electric end-use efficiency: Competitek’s six-volume, 2,509-page, 5,135-footnote The State of the Art series. It showed that full practical retrofit with about a thousand technologies could ultimately save three-fourths of 1986 U.S. electricity, at an average technical cost equivalent to about 1.2¢/kWh. (All costs in this article are in constant 2013 $.) Some who hadn’t read the analyses, or their later summaries in the Technology Atlas series by RMI’s spinoff E Source, thought those savings sounded extreme. Yet the utility industry’s Electric Power Research Institute concurrently found, and summarized in a joint article, a potential to save 39–59% of U.S. electricity just in the 1990s, at an average technical cost around 3.3¢/kWh. Comparisons by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and myself found that simple methodological differences accounted for virtually the whole disparity in the savings’ quantity and cost.

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