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News Article | June 14, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Launching this month, MtnLogic is a new mountain apparel brand founded by Peter Whittaker, and developed with the help of over 60 RMI Expeditions mountain guides. Each MtnLogic prototype has been put to the ultimate test, logging a minimum of 100,000 vertical feet, for alpine workwear that combines logic, performance, and simplicity. The first collection from their clothing line includes 19 products, from technical power tee’s and hoodies to jackets and pants for women and men. MtnLogic founder, and co-owner of the largest guide service in North America, RMI Expeditions, Peter Whittaker has been climbing and guiding for over four decades. Peter has stood atop the Seven Summits, and has a wealth of knowledge on what gear performs best while working and playing outdoors. In discussing the motivation behind MtnLogic, Whittaker said that his family, which includes legendary mountaineers Jim and Lou Whittaker, has “been guiding and climbing for over a half century and has collaborated with industry leading manufacturers along the way to improve the gear we use. After years of teaming with manufacturers, and tagging a few summits along the way, we decided it was time to build our own apparel. Exactly the way we need it to function.” To create MtnLogic’s alpine workwear, Whittaker partnered with PolartecⓇ, a leading textile manufacturer for the outdoor industry. RMI Expeditions mountain guides helped select materials and features for the final products by determining what they needed most from their gear while out in the field for weeks or months at a time. After rigorous testing, the guides selected PolartecⓇ’s NeoShellⓇ, Power WoolⓇ, AlphaⓇ, and High Loft + Power StretchⓇ ProTM materials to make up the first collection of MtnLogic alpine workwear. The first collection of MtnLogic pieces are available online at MtnLogic.com and WhittakerMountaineering.com, and at Whittaker Mountaineering’s Retail and Rental store located at the base of Mt. Rainier in Ashford, Washington. For more information about MtnLogic visit http://www.mtnlogic.com or email info(at)mtnlogic.com. About MtnLogic MtnLogic is a mountain apparel brand founded by Peter Whittaker, lifelong mountaineer and co-owner of RMI Expeditions. MtnLogic is alpine workwear that has been rigorously tested by professional mountain guides, including Whittaker and the team of guides at RMI Expeditions. Earned at altitude, our collective experience ensures that everything we craft is deliberate, functional, and intuitive. It’s our work. It’s our way of life. It’s mountain logic. Visit http://www.mtnlogic.com for more information. About RMI Expeditions Founded in 1969 by Lou Whittaker, RMI Expeditions offers guided mountaineering expeditions all over the world, including on Mt. Rainier, the Seven Summits, and in the North Cascades. RMI Expeditions also offers mountaineering skills clinics, ice climbing, backcountry skiing, and custom mountaineering trips. Visit http://www.rmiguides.com for more information. About Whittaker Mountaineering Mountaineering can be challenging, selecting the right equipment shouldn't be. Whittaker Mountaineering simplifies outfitting by identifying best-in-class outdoor gear. We leverage the collective knowledge of RMI guides to select and lead you to top mountain gear. Visit http://www.whittakermountaineering.com for more information.


Strategic Training Partnership Provides Services Organizations and Enterprise/IT Departments Access to both Resource Management and Project Management Certifications CINCINNATI, OH--(Marketwired - June 05, 2017) - Cincinnati-based RTM Consulting, the leader in services specific training solutions for consulting, professional, support and field services organizations in the technology sector, and the RMI, dedicated to the advancement of resource and workforce management thought leadership, best practices, and globally recognized credentials that certify resource management expertise, announced today they have partnered with 20|20 Business Insight to address the growing demand for the standardization of resource management strategies, practices and processes. This partnership enables 20|20 Business Insight to resell the RMI's Resource Management Certified Professional (RMCP)® certification, and RTM Consulting to resell 20|20 Business Insight's project management training and PMP® certification prep courses in the U.S.A. and Europe. RMCP® is the first-of-its-kind professional certification program specifically designed for resource managers, promoting and supporting competency development for resource management (RM) professionals. Certification holders demonstrate a level of proficiency in RM theory and application, and a commitment to professional development and a career in RM. Additionally, the RMCP® certification provides access to valuable thought leadership, best practices, networks and resources to help RM professionals better manage human capital productivity and utilization. "Resource Management is a key driver of cost and quality performance for project based businesses in the Tech and Enterprise/IT sectors, and the RMCP® certification combined with PMP® certification creates a more comprehensive solution to address this important market need," said Randy Mysliviec, President and CEO, RTM Consulting. "This new partnership with 20|20 Business Insight combines curriculum from two market leaders helping companies building internal competencies for improving project performance and customer satisfaction." The PMP® credential is internationally recognized and demonstrates that the credential holder has the experience, education and competency to lead and direct projects. The PMP® exam preparation course is fully accredited by the Project Management Institute and meets the requirements to cover both PMP® or CAPM® level exams. The course is designed to provide exposure to best practice project management and a full understanding of the knowledge areas and process groups defined in the PMBOK® Guide. "Through this partnership we believe we are able to deliver the best Resource Management solution coupled with a globally renowned qualification in Project Management. It presents 20|20 with opportunity to expand our presence in the US and provide our clients with an expanded choice. As Project Management knowledge specialists, we are delighted to add the RMCP® program to our portfolio and it underlines our commitment to deliver world-class, appropriate training to the Project Management community," said Tony Marks, CEO, 20|20 Business Insight. "We are constantly striving to help our clients optimize their project and people performance and this first-of-its-kind professional certification program does exactly that. Through our partnership with RTM Consulting we feel confident that we can offer a unique suite of Project and Resource Management specific learning options." Specializing in Resource Management, Project/Portfolio and Knowledge Management, and Services Business Optimization, RTM Consulting helps IT hardware, software and field/support services organizations achieve the benefits associated with successful services portfolios. With its unique Just-in-Time Resourcing® solutions, Business Acceleration Services, and training solutions RTM Consulting helps large, medium and small firms move beyond theory to practical application of industry best practices and achievement of exceptional results in the shortest possible period of time. For more information please contact RTM Consulting at info@rtmconsulting.net or www.rtmconsulting.net. The Resource Management Institute is dedicated to the advancement of resource and workforce management thought leadership, best practices and standards, globally recognized credentials that certify resource management expertise, and tools and resources necessary for effective and efficient management of human capital intensive businesses. The Resource Management Institute was created to provide the resource and workforce management community a vehicle to advance the discipline of resource and workforce management, and further the interests of the people who make up this community and the companies they work for. Visit us at www.resourcemanagementinstitute.com, on Twitter and on LinkedIn. 20|20 Business Insight is a full service, project management, business and leadership training and consulting company who deliver training courses and consulting services throughout the world. They are the largest independent provider of project management training courses in the UK and have offices in Scotland, England, and the U.S.A. 20|20 Business Insight provides open-course training; in-house training; contextualized and bespoke APM, PMI and PRINCE2® certified training courses. For more information please visit 2020projectmanagement.com.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

Earlier this month Shell, Statoil, Tepco, Centrica and a half-dozen other energy companies joined the Energy Web Foundation, an alliance devoted to bringing blockchain to the grid. The companies donated $2.5 million to the organization. The foundation was set up in February this year as a collaboration between Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) and Austrian blockchain developer Grid Singularity to “accelerate the commercial deployment of blockchain technology in the energy sector.” The companies and organizations involved think blockchain will be a game-changer for energy, and are working together to provide the frameworks and standards to help ensure that outcome. Jesse Morris, principal for electricity and transportation practices at RMI and co-founder of the Energy Web Foundation (EWF), said the foundation's immediate aim is to garner more affiliates and funding, while developing an open-source blockchain application for use in the energy sector. Initially, partner organizations will evaluate the software, and potentially release it to the public in 2019 or 2020, if all goes well. Blockchain is best known as the platform for Bitcoin. It is an encrypted, distributed database that allows all users to track every transaction -- thus eliminating the need for an intermediary. Blockchain enthusiasts believe the technology can also be used to seamlessly transact electrons between consumers on the grid, while keeping an accurate, incorruptible tally of where they came from and where they went. It could encourage greater peer-to-peer sales on the grid and lay the foundation for microgrids and distributed renewables. “We have a strong hypothesis that blockchain will solve a lot of long-running problems in the energy sector,” said Morris. “Overcoming these challenges could make small, incremental changes to energy infrastructure and markets in the near term, while others would be more far-reaching and disruptive." Certificates (also known as guarantees) of origin would assure the user that a particular megawatt-hour of electricity was produced from renewables. According to Morris, the U.S. alone has 10 different tracking systems, Asia-Pacific has several more, and each European country has its own system of certification. Blockchain could be used to transparently guarantee the origin of the electrons. Longer-term, and more radically, RMI sees the future of electricity networks being driven by the billions of energy storage and HVAC units, EVs, solar roof panels and other devices and appliances at the grid edge. Blockchains can allow any of them to set their own level of participation on the grid, without the need for an intermediary. And crucially, they can be configured so that if a grid operator needs guaranteed capacity, the grid-edge unit can communicate back to the grid whether or not it’s up to the task. This is an example of what Morris described as blockchain’s ability to “fuse the physical with the virtual” via machine-to-machine communication. However, these are still early days. Foundation members have a lot of work to do in order to ensure its credibility, prove the technology works for energy applications, and lay down the foundation for widespread adoption. “Think of it like the App Store,” remarked David Peters, director of strategy and innovation at grid owner-operator Stedin B.V. “We at the EWF are building a shared infrastructure where we can build on top the developed code.” Stedin joined EWF because it believes in blockchain’s potential. “It gives us access to the best blockchain people in the world,” Peters said. He hopes the widespread adoption of the technology will “lower the barriers of participation” for the grid. Engie, the French multinational electric utility, had already conducted its own blockchain research projects before joining EWF. Among them was a program to track smart meters in Burgundy, keeping detailed tabs on solar panel electricity production, and facilitating transactions of a small peer-to-peer community energy trading project in Belgium. Engie's Director of Research and Technologies Raphael Schoentgen explained that blockchain is a promising technology to track smart meter data. “It contributes to better management of electrons over the grid,” he remarked. The technology’s ability to automate transactions for peer-to-peer trading is of key interest to Dr. Hans-Heinrich Kleuker, the CEO of Technische Werke Ludwigshafen, whose company is now also part of EWF. “We’ll see many more consumers with either an energy deficit or a surplus in the near future, and the desire to trade that energy,” he said. “Machine-to-machine communication, such as that offered via blockchain, will be essential to manage the vast number of transactions needed.” Such trades would certainly be beyond the capabilities of a small, local utility such as TWL, said Kleuker. “We are looking at the convergence of different electricity markets, which are very different right now, but longer-term will be facing similar challenges,” Kleuker concluded, convinced that the application of blockchain can meet those challenges. EWF will meet at the end of May to decide which use-case scenarios from around the world it will employ to take the project forward. In the coming years, the foundation will decide on norms and standards that may allow blockchain to be used in a truly universal way and “move beyond the hype.”


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Throughout all of Jim Philippo’s interactions and travels with Iroijlaplap Imata Jabro Kabua, he has seen this man as one who affects the outcome of destiny through his interaction with many of his people or with just about anyone. Philippo considers Kabua as the “kindly king,” who goes out of his way to those who are in need of his services. Kabua has been known to say, “I am only good as a servant to my people.” In “Kwajalein Atoll: The Legacy of Faith and Hope,” (published by Xlibris in December of 2016) Philippo tells the epic tale of the Kwajalein Atoll situated in the mid-Pacific Ocean. This is the untold historical saga of the mass evacuation of native citizens to a stricken barren island in the late 1950s. It is narrated and told by Iroijlaplap Imata Kabua and his sources regarding the U.S. military Use and Operating Rights Agreements (MUORA) between the U.S. government and Republic of the Marshall Islands government (RMI) and the Land Use Agreement (LUA) between the RMI and Kwajalein landowners. According to Philippo, this story also relates just how the citizens of these islands were forced to evacuate from their homeland to inhospitable locations so the U.S. military could strategically use this atoll as an ideal missile target zone. “It is a tale of the native people, who were evacuated in the interest of a US Military build-up without any due regard and concern for any future consequences that would befall these native citizens,” Philippo added. “Kwajalein Atoll: The Legacy of Faith and Hope” includes interviews with Iroijlaplap Imata Jabro Kabua himself, many of his close colleagues and subjects who took part in the protests and demonstrations that were held when he began his journey leading and standing at the edge of adventure as an advocate in politics, taking the helm of the nation as the second president of the Republic and as the Paramount Iroijlaplap (King) of the largest land parcels on Kwajalein Atoll and the Atolls of the Kabin Meto, and certain Ralik Chain Islands in the Marshall Island archipelago. “Kwajalein Atoll: The Legacy of Faith and Hope” By Jim Philippo Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 272 pages | ISBN 9781499062540 Softcover | 6 x 9in | 272 pages | ISBN 9781499062533 E-Book | 272 pages | ISBN 9781499062557 Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble About the Author Jim Philippo was born in the Marshall Islands on Imoroj in Jaluit Atoll. He graduated from National University in San Diego, California, with a bachelor’s degree in banking and finance. He resides in the Marshall Islands in Ajeltake, Majouro Atoll. This is his first book to be published. He currently holds the post of assistant commissioner of police in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Xlibris Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider created in 1997 by authors, for authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles. For more information, visit xlibris.com or call 1-888-795-4274 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisPub on Twitter for the latest news. ###


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

Platform business models have redefined the modern economy. From titans of personal computing and e-commerce like Apple and Amazon, to ubiquitous financial services that we use with hardly a second thought (such as ATMs and credit cards), industries everywhere have reoriented from one-directional pipeline delivery systems to multisided platforms via which information and services flow in many directions between actors. This platform concept has also been suggested for the electric utility sector -- often under the title of a “distribution system operator,” or DSO. Concepts from platform markets hold tremendous promise for addressing many of the modern challenges on the grid, including the integration of distributed energy resources (DERs) and the business challenges associated with that. Yet despite the promise and seeming appropriateness of such concepts, the innovation and reimagining of producer/consumer relationships that platform markets can offer have been slow to be introduced on the grid. There are reasons for this. The electricity system is immensely complex, and many roles, regulations, and physical systems need to be considered before a fully baked DSO or platform design can be realized. But it would be a mistake to conclude from this that DSO platforms are out of reach or too difficult to implement in the electricity industry. In fact, DSO innovation is already happening -- in some cases in unexpected places -- and suggests that what we imagine as the DSO may or may not be the DSO we get. And that’s OK. Those and plenty of other insights came out of a discussion on this topic of Rocky Mountain Institute’s Electricity Innovation Lab (e-Lab). A bevy of opinions and proposals have been thrown around for what form a DSO system should take. Most notably, at least in the U.S., is the New York Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) process, where regulators have decided to put the utility in the role of “distributed system platform” (DSP) provider -- a variant on the DSO concept that emphasizes the role of integrating DERs to achieve system goals, including network efficiency, growth in new customer services, and greenhouse gas reductions. On the other side of the country in California, utilities are required to file distribution resource plans as part of the Golden State’s own approach to modernizing utility and distribution systems to better integrate new DERs. Meanwhile, at ComEd in Illinois, the utility has taken the lead in promoting the idea of transforming the utility to a platform business model. There, the CEO and senior utility management have publicly stated their desire to remake the utility business model into a smart energy platform model. It is not only regulators and utilities that hold this vision. To achieve their full potential, many solar companies and other third-party service providers also see the opportunity afforded by more transactional platforms on which to sell services and reach customers. As proposals and discussions pile up, the complexities of building a DSO system are also revealed. Many internet businesses and other platform markets are not capital-intensive business models (think Airbnb and Uber), and are not beholden to legacy investments and regulatory systems. But remaking the distribution grid as a multisided platform has proven hard to do. Still, some of the same value-laden opportunities afforded to digital businesses could also be taken advantage of on the grid, where they may unlock significant economic savings in reallocated capital expense and gains in economic efficiency. More than most other industries, electricity is already heavily regulated, with features of natural monopoly and significant barriers to entry (some barriers are real and others are imposed by entrenched market structures). This requires addressing thorny questions in public and institutional forums, such as public utility commission proceedings or policy debates. Just a few of the major questions that confront DSO development are: Although the DSO concept can appear relatively straightforward and attractive at first glance, it tends to get more complicated the closer you get. This is not reason for despair. In fact, the mistake may be in assuming that we need to know the answers to every DSO design question at the outset. Although the above design decisions are important and consequential, more will be learned from experiments and demonstration projects than from abstract discussions that attempt to settle everything beforehand. A few notable examples were reviewed at the e-Lab Summit, which are instructive for where DSO design might be headed. One hotbed of experimentation is New York state, where utilities under the REV process are being pushed to experiment with DSP concepts. For example, Con Edison is implementing a virtual power plant (VPP) on 300 homes in New York City and is testing new approaches to aggregate DERs, including solar and storage, to replace the need for traditional investments. The technical potential for the VPP is proving very promising, but scaling the project may be challenging -- including how to make the VPP approach compatible with existing tariff designs and how to allow aggregated resources to bid into New York Independent System Operator markets. Another exciting experiment comes from the other side of the world. The Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) has sponsored a project to pair technology with competitive market structures in its Decentralized Energy Exchange (deX) project. At the heart of deX, DSO functions are provided by a software-as-a-service layer that reviews availability and price bids from multiple vendors to aggregate demand response and related services from individual homes. The software, provided by GreenSync, selects bids on a least-cost basis in order to deliver required energy or demand reductions to the distribution network operator (i.e., the utility). While the project’s scale is small, it introduces an interesting potential into the DSO debate: Rather than a utility vs. third-party paradigm, can some DSO functions be as simple as writing software and integrating it into the network? Hints of the DSO future may also be emerging from outside the traditional electricity sector. For example, revolutionary opportunities may emerge from blockchain-enabled systems, which could transform the ways in which data is collected and shared, not to mention how payments and other contracts are enforced. Numerous organizations and initiatives (including the Hyperledger project at Linux Foundation and RMI’s own Energy Web Foundation) are rapidly staking out this space to develop the technology and business structures that will define new applications. What does this all mean? Clearly, we have a way to go before the DSO vision is realized. And there are certainly some big questions to wrestle with about DSO identity, revenue structures, and more. This is the reality of being in a sector that has massive legacy systems -- both physical and institutional -- and that is critically important to the economy and national security. But while those discussions proceed, it is essential that we also make space for experimentation and incremental learning. Leading states and utilities, and especially new entrants and innovators, are showing glimpses of what a platform-based electricity system may look like. These efforts should be accelerated and their successes scaled. Then, in all likelihood, those questions will start to get answered along the way. Dan Cross-Call is a manager with Rocky Mountain Institute's electricity practice. This piece was originally published at RMI's Outlet and was republished with permission.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

India’s premier national policy thinktank, The National Institution for Transforming India (NITI Aayog), and Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), a global nonprofit organization focused on driving the efficient and restorative use of resources, today presented specific and actionable solutions to transform India’s mobility sector. The opportunities presented were developed at a February meeting of 75 senior representatives from the Government of India, the private sector, and civil society. India is at a decisive moment in the development of its mobility sector. Benefiting from lessons learned globally, and presented with the opportunity to avoid the traps of private vehicle ownership and heavy reliance on imported fuel, India could lead the world in advanced mobility solutions. Rapidly evolving technologies and business models for delivering mobility services have dramatic potential to transform the transportation sector, and India is uniquely positioned to take advantage of these developments due to a set of advantageous conditions and distinctive capabilities. India Leaps Ahead: Transformative Mobility Solutions for All, produced by NITI Aayog and RMI and based on inputs from 75 stakeholders during the NITI Aayog and RMI Transformative Mobility Solutions Charrette in February, establishes a vision for the future of India’s mobility system, outlines a set of actionable solutions to realize the vision, and estimates the impact of such a transformation. The report details a “leapfrog” opportunity that may allow India to save as much as 1 gigatonne of carbon emissions between 2017 and 2030, and approximately US$60 billion in annual diesel and petrol costs in 2030. These savings are made possible by the synergistic impact of improvements in systems, manufacturing, and shared infrastructure, including better urban design, high-utilization business models, accelerated adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), and other levers. Pursuing this path for mobility development would enhance energy security, reduce air pollution and carbon emissions, and create dynamic economic opportunities. Transformation of the mobility sector represents an opportunity to create value not just for passengers, but also for the electricity sector. India has set a target of installing 175 gigawatts of renewable energy generation by 2022. This ambitious target, coupled with India’s electric mobility vision, can create more value and be more readily achieved when pursued together, rather than separately. The report’s vision outlines a shared, electric, and connected mobility future that provides India’s citizens with clean, affordable, cost-effective, and reliable transportation options to support and enhance their daily lives. As transporation costs impact low- and moderate-income cititzens the most, this transformation could also inclusively provide important economic and social benefits to this population segment. A set of enabling conditions—dynamic public- and private-sector leadership, entrepreneurial culture, ability to build infrastructure right the first time, and a unique confluence of information technology and manufacturing skills—positions India to lead the world in advanced mobility solutions with great benefits for its citizens. The report estimates that India can conservatively save up to 64% of anticipated passenger mobility-related energy demand and 37% of carbon emissions in 2030 (totaling 1 gigatonne of CO2 savings between 2017 and 2030) compared to business as usual by pursuing a shared, electric, and connected mobility future. By 2030, this would result in an annual diesel and petrol reduction of 156 million tonnes of oil equivalent (MTOE). At current oil prices, this would imply a net annual fuel cost savings of approximately 3.9 lakh crore by 2030 (US$60 billion). Reductions in energy consumption and carbon emissions result from a synergistic impact of improvements in: Systems integration: Enabling widespread adoption of mobility solutions through improved urban design, prevalence of shared services, and availability of interoperable transport data. Scaled Manufacturing: Facilitating market creation through policies and mechanisms that enable manufacturing of EVs and necessary components in successive segments, based on their market readiness. Shared Infrastructure Development: Better urban design, where a larger fraction of mobility demand is met by nonmotorized transit and public transit, and access to vehicle-charging infrastructure enables higher penetration of EVs. India’s current mobility system reflects many of the underlying properties of this new mobility paradigm. These elements include a high share of nonmotorized transit, low private-vehicle ownership, a diverse set of mode options, and strong IT capabilities. As India continues to develop at a rapid pace, the report outlines strategies to invest in and enhance these attributes as they serve as the foundation of a shared, electric, and connected mobility system. Despite these supportive conditions, India faces challenges that signal the gravitational pull of privately owned vehicles, and reinforces the importance of pursuing an alternative mobility future. Every day, nearly 50,000 new motor vehicles (two-, three-, and four-wheelers) hit the roads and India has seen a 10% annual increase in vehicle registration over the past decade. If current trends continue, the number of personal vehicles in India could increase three- to four-fold by 2030, at significant direct and indirect costs to the economy and society. The solutions outlined in the report can deliver convenient and affordable access to mobility, while avoiding the pitfalls of the conventional mobilty paradigm. The February event explored technologies, business models, and policies, and developed actionable steps to help India leapfrog traditional approaches to passenger mobility and achieve an advanced mobility future. The event provided a unique forum where stakeholders engaged in focused dialogue and innovated on issues that have historically been pursued in silos. This extensive collaboration helped unlock new opportunities that can position India as the global leader in innovative mobility solutions. Statement from Mr. Amitabh Kant, CEO NITI Aayog: “India is at the cusp of making a transition to transformative mobility solutions that are economically viable, environment friendly and socially desirable. The main elements for India’s mobility transformation are system integration, shared infrastructure development and scaled manufacturing. Accordingly, the charrette, organised in February 2017 with a multitude of stakeholders, deliberated upon strategies and ideas to make this transformative shift. This report summarizes the solutions emerging out of the charrette process and lays a path that India needs to pursue.” Statement from Mr. Jules Kortenhorst, CEO Rocky Mountain Institute: “India has a historic opportunity to lead the world in transforming its mobility sector. The country can combine its entrepreneurial spirit, robust public- and private-sector partnerships, and history of innovation in information technology and manufacturing with the advances in clean energy and transportation technology to drive global mobility innovation. This report provides a clear roadmap to realize the powerful economic, environmental, and social benefits these approaches will provide, both to Indian citizens and to those around the globe.” The report can be found at: https://www.rmi.org/insights/reports/transformative_mobility_solutions_india About NITI Aayog: The National Institution for Transforming India, also called NITI Aayog, was formed via a resolution of the Union Cabinet on January 1, 2015. NITI Aayog is the premier policy ‘Think Tank’ of the Government of India, providing both directional and policy inputs. While designing strategic and long term policies and programmes for the Government of India, NITI Aayog also provides relevant technical advice to the Centre and States. About Rocky Mountain Institute: Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI)—an independent nonprofit founded in 1982—transforms global energy use to create a clean, prosperous, and secure low-carbon future. It engages businesses, communities, institutions, and entrepreneurs to accelerate the adoption of market-based solutions that cost-effectively shift from fossil fuels to efficiency and renewables. RMI has offices in Basalt and Boulder, Colorado; New York City; Washington, D.C.; and Beijing.


« Energy companies partner with RMI and Grid Singularity to launch global blockchain initiative for energy | Main | Wrightspeed partners with AxleTech on heavy-duty electric drive » The Volkswagen Group has invested some €3 billion (US$3.3 billion) in alternative drive technologies over the past five years and will triple this amount in the course of the next five years, said Matthias Müller, CEO of Volkswagen AG, at the Group’s Annual General Meeting in Hanover. “The future is electric. We intend to be the Nº 1 in e-mobility by 2025,” said Müller at the meeting. At the same time, the Volkswagen Group is continuing to develop diesel and gasoline engines, targeting making them a further 10 to 15 percent more efficient and cleaner by 2020. “Diesel,” said Müller, “will remain indispensable for the foreseeable future.” In total, the Volkswagen Group will be investing around €10 billion (US$10.9 billion) in these technologies by 2022. The Volkswagen Group will introduce more than 10 new electrified models by the end of 2018, Müller said. By 2025, the Group will and more than 30 more BEVs.The newly-established Center of Excellence in Salzgitter will bundle Group-wide competence in battery cells and modules. At the same time, the Group is negotiating partnerships in the field of battery cells in Europe and China. Müller also highlighted how the realignment of the Group from an automaker into a globally leading mobility provider was gaining a foothold, citing further initiatives. A central element of the program for the future is partnerships to develop new business opportunities or advance new technologies. Müller referred to several examples such as the plans to enter the economy segment with Tata, the envisaged joint venture with JAC in China to develop attractively-priced electric cars, and numerous cooperation projects in the field of mobility services.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Praj cellulosic ethanol demo plant running in India; commercial projects coming | Main | Energy companies partner with RMI and Grid Singularity to launch global blockchain initiative for energy » Chemists from the US Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory and their collaborators have definitively identified the active sites of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO . The results, published in the journal Science, resolve a longstanding debate about exactly which catalytic components take part in the chemical reactions—and thus which should be the focus of efforts to boost performance. The hydrogenation of carbon dioxide is a key step in the production of methanol; catalysts made from copper (Cu) and zinc oxide (ZnO) on alumina supports are often used. There has been a debate over the actual active sites for the reaction on the catalyst. Different groups of scientists had proposed two different active sites for the catalyst—a portion of the system with just copper and zinc atoms, or a portion with copper zinc oxide. To determine which part of the molecular structure binds and breaks and makes bonds to convert reactants to product—and how it does that—co-author Jose Rodriguez performed a series of laboratory experiments using well-defined model catalysts, including one made of zinc nanoparticles supported on a copper surface, and another with zinc oxide nanoparticles on copper. To tell the two apart, he used an energetic x-ray beam to zap the samples, and measured the properties of electrons emitted. These electronic “signatures” contain information about the oxidation state of the atoms the electrons came from—whether zinc or zinc oxide. Meanwhile Liu, Jingguang Chen of Brookhaven Lab and Columbia University, and Shyam Kattel, the first author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow co-advised by Liu and Chen, used computational resources at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)—two DOE Office of Science User Facilities—to model how these two types of catalysts would engage in the CO -to-methanol transformations. These theoretical studies use calculations that take into account the basic principles of breaking and making chemical bonds, including the energy required, the electronic states of the atoms, and the reaction conditions, allowing scientists to derive the reaction rates and determine which catalyst will give the best rate of conversion. Those predictions matched what Rodriguez observed in the laboratory. All the sites participating in these reactions were copper zinc oxide. Optimizing the copper/zinc oxide interface will become the driving principal for designing a new catalyst, the scientists say. Rodriguez said that the team will try different configurations of the atoms at the copper/zinc oxide interface to see how that affects the reaction rate. Additionally, they will move from studying the model system to systems that would be more practical for use by industry. An essential tool for this next step will be Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), another Office of Science User Facility. NSLS-II produces extremely bright beams of x-rays—about 10,000 times brighter than the broad-beam laboratory x-ray source used in this study. Those intense x-ray beams will allow the scientists to take high-resolution snapshots that reveal both structural and chemical information about the catalyst, the reactants, and the chemical intermediates that form as the reaction occurs. An additional co-author, Pedro Ramírez of Universidad Central de Venezuela, made important contributions to this study by helping to test the activity of the copper zinc and copper zinc oxide catalysts. This research was supported by the DOE Office of Science.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Centrica plc, Elia, Engie, Royal Dutch Shell plc, Sempra Energy, SP Group, Statoil ASA, Stedin, TWL (Technical Works Ludwigshafen AG), and Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) have joined forces to support the Energy Web Foundation (EWF), a non-profit organization whose mission is to accelerate the commercial deployment of blockchain technology in the energy sector. Thanks to their support, EWF has secured the first round of funding amounting to $2.5 million. EWF is a partnership between Rocky Mountain Institute, an independent, U.S.-based nonprofit organization focused on driving the efficient and restorative use of resources, and Grid Singularity, a blockchain technology developer specializing in energy sector applications. Blockchain technology reduces transaction costs by keeping a single logical copy of transaction records—avoiding the need for reconciliation and settlement. Because of its unique attributes, blockchain technology has the potential to play a significant and potentially game-changing role in the energy sector. On the incremental side, blockchain technology can be used to reduce the cost of utility bills or the need for working capital in wholesale market gas or electricity transactions. On the game-changing side, blockchain technology can allow millions of energy devices (HVAC systems, water heaters, electric vehicles, batteries, solar PV installations) to transact with each other at the distribution edge while providing support to utilities and grid operators to integrate more utility-scale variable renewable energy capacity at much lower cost. “The main challenge of the electricity sector in the 21st Century is to integrate more renewable energy into the grid in a cost-effective fashion in a context of largely flat or diminishing demand. The only way we know how to do this is by automating the demand side—by allowing many more participants in the grid. That means automation at the distribution edge, and integration of this automation with wholesale markets,” Hervé Touati, a managing director at RMI and president of EWF, said. “We are excited by the potential of blockchain technology as an enabler to realize that vision. Blockchain will not be the only building block of the 21st Century grid, but it will most likely be a key building block. It also provides much higher levels of cybersecurity essentially for free—which addresses, as a by-product, one of the key concerns of utility executives when it comes to distributed energy resources.” As a cofounder of EWF, Grid Singularity is leading the development of an open-source, energy-specific blockchain infrastructure that will be maintained by EWF and supporting affiliates. Grid Singularity, together with its partner Parity Technologies, will bring the most advanced blockchain technology, addressing the limitations in terms of speed and transaction costs of the currently available blockchains, and enabling features that are focused on supporting energy-specific applications. “The current test-network ‘Kovan,’ which is a proof-of-concept for the new consensus algorithm, has the ability to perform up to 1,000 transactions per second (tps) and is already used by many blockchain start-ups. By embedding further state channel technology, we intend for our architecture to facilitate scaling to 1 million tps over the next several years,” Ewald Hesse, chief executive of Grid Singularity and vice-president of EWF, said. “With the ‘Polkadot’ design conceived by Parity Technologies, we are also introducing the concept of interoperability among multiple blockchain architectures, which should free users from technology lock-in.” In parallel with the development of an open-source IT infrastructure, EWF also will work on analyzing use cases and organizing task forces to push the most promising use cases into proof of concepts and commercial applications, while incubating an ecosystem of application developers, and cooperating with regulators and standardization bodies to facilitate deployment. EWF is actively soliciting collaboration with other technology providers eager to support the open-source approach of eliminating energy market entry barriers. More information on EWF can be found at: http://www.energyweb.org. ### About Rocky Mountain Institute Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI)—an independent nonprofit founded in 1982—transforms global energy use to create a clean, prosperous, and secure low-carbon future. It engages businesses, communities, institutions, and entrepreneurs to accelerate the adoption of market-based solutions that cost-effectively shift from fossil fuels to efficiency and renewables. RMI has offices in Basalt and Boulder, Colorado; New York City; Washington, D.C.; and Beijing. About Grid Singularity and Parity Technologies Grid Singularity is a technology company developing an open source software platform for energy applications based on blockchain technology, and additional decentralized applications that enable automated, secure, and more efficient energy applications. Its partner and cofounder is Parity Technologies, the world’s foremost blockchain core technology firm. Established by many of the team that delivered the Ethereum network and headed by Ethereum founder and former CTO, Gavin Wood, Parity Technologies has since released the most advanced blockchain technology stack “Parity.” Parity’s software powers much of the Ethereum network and has proven to be the most reliable blockchain software. Newly designed consensus technologies, including Parity’s Proof-of-Authority algorithms, will facilitate the applications of this technology in the energy sector.


« Brookhaven team identifies active sites on catalysts for converting CO2 to methanol | Main | Volkswagen Group to invest approximately €10B in powertrain technologies over the next five years; targeting Nº 1 in e-mobility by 2022 » Centrica plc, Elia, Engie, Royal Dutch Shell plc, Sempra Energy, SP Group, Statoil ASA, Stedin, TWL (Technical Works Ludwigshafen AG), and Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) have joined forces to support the Energy Web Foundation (EWF), a non-profit organization the mission of which is to accelerate the commercial deployment of blockchain technology in the energy sector. Thanks to their support, EWF has secured the first round of funding amounting to $2.5 million. Blockchain is a decentralized, immutable shared digital ledger of transactions maintained by an online network. It originally underpinned Bitcoin, but has gained traction as a means to record and track the movement of assets. Blockchain shows promise across a wide range of business applications. EWF is a partnership between Rocky Mountain Institute, an independent, US-based non-profit organization focused on driving the efficient and restorative use of resources, and Grid Singularity, a blockchain technology developer specializing in energy sector applications. Blockchain technology reduces transaction costs by keeping a single logical copy of transaction records—avoiding the need for reconciliation and settlement. Because of its unique attributes, blockchain technology has the potential to play a significant and potentially game-changing role in the energy sector. On the incremental side, blockchain technology can be used to reduce the cost of utility bills or the need for working capital in wholesale market gas or electricity transactions. On the game-changing side, blockchain technology can allow millions of energy devices (HVAC systems, water heaters, electric vehicles, batteries, solar PV installations) to transact with each other at the distribution edge while providing support to utilities and grid operators to integrate more utility-scale variable renewable energy capacity at much lower cost. The main challenge of the electricity sector in the 21st Century is to integrate more renewable energy into the grid in a cost-effective fashion in a context of largely flat or diminishing demand. The only way we know how to do this is by automating the demand side—by allowing many more participants in the grid. That means automation at the distribution edge, and integration of this automation with wholesale markets. We are excited by the potential of blockchain technology as an enabler to realize that vision. Blockchain will not be the only building block of the 21st Century grid, but it will most likely be a key building block. It also provides much higher levels of cybersecurity essentially for free—which addresses, as a by-product, one of the key concerns of utility executives when it comes to distributed energy resources. —Hervé Touati, a managing director at RMI and president of EWF As a cofounder of EWF, Grid Singularity is leading the development of an open-source, energy-specific blockchain infrastructure that will be maintained by EWF and supporting affiliates. Grid Singularity, together with its partner Parity Technologies, will bring the most advanced blockchain technology, addressing the limitations in terms of speed and transaction costs of the currently available blockchains, and enabling features that are focused on supporting energy-specific applications. The current test-network ‘Kovan,’ which is a proof-of-concept for the new consensus algorithm, has the ability to perform up to 1,000 transactions per second (tps) and is already used by many blockchain start-ups. By embedding further state channel technology, we intend for our architecture to facilitate scaling to 1 million tps over the next several years. With the ‘Polkadot’ design conceived by Parity Technologies, we are also introducing the concept of interoperability among multiple blockchain architectures, which should free users from technology lock-in. —Ewald Hesse, chief executive of Grid Singularity and vice-president of EWF In parallel with the development of an open-source IT infrastructure, EWF also will work on analyzing use cases and organizing task forces to push the most promising use cases into proof of concepts and commercial applications, while incubating an ecosystem of application developers, and cooperating with regulators and standardization bodies to facilitate deployment. EWF is actively soliciting collaboration with other technology providers eager to support the open-source approach of eliminating energy market entry barriers.

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