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Atlanta, GA, United States

News Article | October 29, 2015
Site: www.i-newswire.com

The food processing industry has performed better than the wider manufacturing sector in recent years and growth is forecast at between 3-4% in the short to medium term. Construction output in the sector is forecast to remain relatively buoyant with growth at a similar level of 3-5% over the next few years. The FDMP sector has recently seen increased capital investment levels, reflecting the growing optimism in the wider economy. The food processing industry has performed better than the wider manufacturing sector in recent years and growth is forecast at between 3-4% in the short to medium term. Construction output in the sector is forecast to remain relatively buoyant with growth at a similar level of 3-5% over the next few years. The FDMP sector has recently seen increased capital investment levels, reflecting the growing optimism in the wider economy. The food and drink manufacturing and processing industry (FDMP) is the single largest manufacturing sector in the UK, employing around 400,000 workers, and exports of food and drink products form an important proportion of UK trade. The value of UK food and non-alcoholic drink exports increased by over 6% in 2014, the 10th consecutive year of record growth. Exports of UK dairy are also at a record high. The market is polarised, with over 8,000 companies active in the FDMP sector across the UK, and over 85% of enterprises qualifying as small. However, the top 5 UK food companies account for over £30bn in terms of turnover, with the leading 20 food producers operating over 300 manufacturing and distribution sites across the UK. In total, there are over 9,500 manufacturing sites and factories in the UK FDMP sector, with the bakery, meat processing and dairy industry operating the largest number of processing sites and accounting for the highest turnover. FDMP activity varies across the UK, with Scotland, the North West and Yorkshire and Humber having the highest concentration of food processing activity. The industry is characterised by an ageing stock of manufacturing facilities and equipment, and new projects are mainly focused on upgrading existing assets to achieve greater efficiencies, leading to higher outputs and lower costs. Upgrading and fit-out work therefore accounts for around 80% of total output in the sector. Growing demand in certain sectors has driven capacity expansion, with significant projects in the dairy, beverage, meat and ready meals sectors recently completed or under development. However, with fewer new build factories now being built, there is more of an emphasis on regular maintenance of existing facilities ensuring that machinery and processing equipment is running efficiently. Going forward, construction output in the food processing sector is likely to remain relatively buoyant, mainly driven by RMI activity, however, the industry faces the ongoing challenges of rising costs, compliance and regulatory controls, EU legislation and political priorities. Therefore construction output is forecast to grow by between 3-5% over the next few years to reach a total of around £475m by 2019. “The impact of the recession and consolidation and rationalisation in the food industry has meant that food manufacturers have become more cautious about investing in new plants and facilities” said Keith Taylor, Director of AMA Research. “However, it seems the current focus is on refurbishment and modernisation projects aimed at improving production capacity and efficiency through initiatives such as automation and temporary processing“. Follow on twitter for Construction and Home Improvement Updates: @AMAResearch The ‘Construction Activity in the Food & Drink Manufacturing & Processing Industry Market Report - UK 2015-2019 Analysis’ report is published by AMA Research, a leading provider of market research and consultancy services within the construction and home improvement markets. The report is available now and can be ordered online at www.amaresearch.co.uk or by calling +44 1242 235724. If you would like to receive further information or wish to speak to an author of this report, please contact Anna Eriksson on +44 1242 235724 or email annaeriksson@amaresearch.co.uk. Please include our web address and telephone number on any review printed, and it would also be appreciated if a copy of the review could be forwarded to AMA Research. Thank you.


News Article | October 2, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

SEATTLE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Alternative Nobel Prize. Keller Rohrback’s client, The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), and its Foreign Minister, Tony deBrum, have been awarded the honorary 2015 Right Livelihood Award. The award was given specifically “in recognition of their vision and courage to take legal action against the nuclear powers for failing to honor their disarmament obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.” The Right Livelihood Award is presented annually in Stockholm at a ceremony in the Swedish Parliament. It was established in 1980 to honor and support those “offering practical and exemplary answers to the most urgent challenges facing us today,” and it has become widely known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize.” Keller Rohrback represents the RMI in the Nuclear Zero Lawsuit, which asks the Court to order the U.S. to fulfill its legal obligation under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty to negotiate in good faith to cease the nuclear arms race, and for nuclear disarmament. Upon hearing of the award, lead attorney Laurie Ashton said, “Minister deBrum has been tireless and fearless in his focused pursuit, on behalf of the Marshall Islands, of binding, legal solutions to the abject failure of the Nations possessing nuclear weapons to negotiate nuclear disarmament in good faith. It is a privilege to represent the Marshall Islands and work on this tremendous effort and I congratulate Minister deBrum, and the people of the Marshall Islands, on this well-deserved award.” Keller Rohrback L.L.P. is a law firm based in the United States that represents clients throughout the world. The firm has offices in Seattle, New York, Phoenix, and Santa Barbara, and is affiliated with independent law firms in Europe, South America, and Asia.


Today, Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) and HOMER Energy released a report, The Economics of Load Defection, detailing where and when grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems could supply the majority of customers’ electricity needs that traditionally the grid would have supplied. As retail prices for grid electricity climb and costs for solar PV and batteries continue their decline, grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems present an increasingly cost-effective option for customers in the next 10–15 years in many geographies. The report, which was completed using HOMER’s software system, explains just how much electricity load and revenue loss utilities could face, including implications for utilities and regulators and possible paths forward. Compared to the off-grid solar-plus-battery systems modeled in RMI’s 2014 report The Economics of Grid Defection, the grid-connected systems modeled in this report are smaller and thus cost less, making them economic sooner for more customers in more places. As customers adopt the economically optimal configuration of these systems over time, the grid’s contribution to meeting customers’ electricity needs shrinks significantly, while solar PV rises to supply the majority for far lower costs. “These findings should be compelling for customers and technology providers,” said RMI Principal and report author James Mandel. “No matter how expensive retail electricity gets in the future, customers that invest in these grid-connected systems can contain their electricity costs at or below a ‘peak price,’ yielding significant savings on their monthly utility bill.” But for many utilities, this customer opportunity could have major implications. Even if only a fraction of customers adopt such systems, utilities could face lost kWh sales from central generation, potentially undermining revenue needed for ongoing grid investment and maintenance. For example, in the Northeast United States, by 2030 maximum residential and commercial load defection could total 140 million MWh and $35 billion per year. “This is not all risk,” explained RMI manager and report coauthor Leia Guccione. “Because these solar-plus-battery systems are grid-connected, they can offer value and services back to the grid. We need not see them only as a threat.” Solar-plus-battery systems will likely play a central role in the grid of the future. But exactly what role they’ll play has yet to be determined. The evolution of retail pricing structures, utility business models, and regulatory frameworks will largely guide that evolution and set the grid on one of two major possible trajectories. “Today’s electricity system is at a metaphorical fork in the road. Down one path are pricing structures, business models and regulatory environments that favor eventual grid defection,” said Jules Kortenhorst, CEO of Rocky Mountain Institute and Carbon War Room. “Down another road, those same factors are appropriately valued as part of a transactive grid with lower system-wide costs and the foundation of a reliable, resilient, affordable and low-carbon grid of the future in which customers are empowered with choice. That’s why RMI is focused on new utility business models, regulatory reform in places like New York, and accelerated adoption of rooftop solar and other DERs—so that the grid of the future can provide customers reliable, clean, affordable power for decades to come.” About Rocky Mountain Institute Since 1982, Rocky Mountain Institute has advanced market-based solutions that transform global energy use to create a clean, prosperous, and secure future. An independent, nonprofit think-and-do tank, RMI engages with businesses, communities, and institutions to accelerate and scale replicable solutions that drive the cost-effective shift from fossil fuels to efficiency and renewables. For more information, please contact media(at)rmi(dot)org About HOMER Energy HOMER Energy LLC is the global leader in the design and analysis of remote microgrids. The HOMER (Hybrid Optimization of Multiple Energy Resources) software has over 110,000 users worldwide. HOMER Energy provides the HOMER software, training, analytical services, and community market access tools to professionals in the energy industry who desire to analyze and optimize distributed power systems and systems that incorporate high penetrations of renewable energy sources. Visit http://homerenergy.com for more information.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pw6htf/construction) has announced the addition of the "Construction activity in the Food & Drink Manufacturing & Processing Industry Market Report - UK 2015-2019 Analysis" report to their offering. Growth is forecast at between 3-4% in the short to medium term, and the sector is expected to reach an approximate value of £113.1bn in 2018-19. The food and drink manufacturing and processing industry (FDMP) is the single largest manufacturing sector in the UK, employing around 400,000 workers. The food processing industry has performed better than the wider manufacturing sector. Over 8,000 companies are active in the FDMP sector across the UK, with over 85% of enterprises qualifying as small (fewer than 50 employees). However, the top 5 UK food companies account for over £30bn in terms of turnover, with the top 20 food producers operating over 300 manufacturing and distribution sites across the UK. There are over 9,500 manufacturing sites and factories in the UK FDMP sector, with the bakery, meat processing and dairy industry operating the largest number of processing sites. FDMP activity varies across the UK, with Scotland, the North West and Yorkshire and Humber having the highest concentration of food processing activity. Over the last couple of years, the FDMP sector has seen increased capital investment levels, reflecting the growing optimism in the wider economy. The industry is characterised by an ageing stock of manufacturing facilities and equipment and new projects are mainly focused on upgrading existing assets to achieve greater efficiencies, leading to higher outputs and lower costs. Upgrading and fit-out work therefore accounts for around 80% of total output in the sector. Going forward construction output in the food processing sector is likely to remain relatively buoyant, mainly driven by RMI activity. As a result, we are forecasting growth rates in construction output of between 3-5% over the next few years to reach a total of around £475m by 2019. 5. Construction Capability and Supply in the FDMP Market


News Article | May 11, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

KAOHSIUNG, Taiwan & WEWAK, Papua New Guinea--(BUSINESS WIRE)--FCF Fishery Company (FCF) announced today that its first load of Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified skipjack tuna harvested from Pacific Island Nation (PNA) waters has been delivered to Papua New Guinea for processing. The sustainable harvest is a first for the region. The 290 metric tons of MSC-certified skipjack were harvested by FCF’s associated purse seiners and carried from Majuro, Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI) to be processed by Wewak-based South Seas Tuna Corporation (SSTC), an FCF subsidiary. According to FCF, SSTC plans to invest USD 3.5 million in capital expenditures to increase its production capacity to 160 MT per day. “FCF has been a fisheries leader in the PNA region for more than 30 years,” said FCF CEO Mr. WH Lee. “This investment advances our production and sustainable operations capabilities while adding up to 700 additional labor jobs in Wewak.” In January of this year, FCF made a public commitment to adhere to MSC sustainability standards while trading tuna harvested from PNA waters. Under the agreement, FCF ensures traceability and reporting of fish harvesting, transportation, and processing into semi-finished and finished products. Currently, more than 60 FCF-associated fishing vessels are MSC-certified. “SSTC is excited to start processing sustainable fish at our Papua New Guinea headquarters,” said SSTC president Mike McCulley. “This environmental approach and strategic partnerships with local leaders are not only a boost to the Wewak economy; these measures also help ensure a sustainable and plentiful fishery for the Pacific Island Nations for generations to come.” “As home to the world’s largest sustainable tuna purse seine fishery, we have been looking forward to this day for years,” said Commercial Manager of PNA Fisheries Maurice Brownjohn. “It is always a pleasure to partner with companies like FCF and SSTC, which harvest, process and market PNA fish in an environmentally conscious and ethical manner; as well as to see fish delivered by carrier to local plants and processed in the region.” About FCF Fishery Co., Ltd. Fong Chun Formosa Fishery Company, Ltd. (FCF) is one of the largest marine products trading companies globally with more than 40 years of experience in the trading and marketing of tuna products. FCF has established more than 30 subsidiaries, fishing bases and shipping agents throughout the world to handle the service needs of its customers. The company works closely with related governing and non-governing organizations to ensure environmental sustainability of marine life products. Learn more about the company’s commitment to safety and environmental sustainability at www.fcf.com.tw. South Seas Tuna Corporation (SSTC) is a state of the art tuna processing facility located in Papua New Guinea. It is joint venture of FCF Fishery Company of Taiwan, and Papua New Guinea interests. More at www.southseastuna.com.

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