Fort Collins, CO, United States
Fort Collins, CO, United States

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Safari A.,Vrije Universiteit Brussel | De Smedt F.,Vrije Universiteit Brussel | Moreda F.,Riverside Technologies Inc. | Moreda F.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Journal of Hydrology | Year: 2012

This paper describes the application of a spatially distributed hydrologic model (WetSpa) Water and Energy Transfer between Soil, Plants and Atmosphere, for the second phase of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP2) study. The model implementation is based on 30-m spatial resolution and 1. h time-step for all basins and interior watersheds involved in the DMIP study. Rainfall inputs are derived from Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD). The distributed model parameters are based on an extensive database of watershed characteristics available for the region, including digital maps of topography, soil type, and landuse. The model is calibrated and validated on part of the river flow records for each basin and applied to the smaller interior watersheds not used in calibration to assess the model performance in ungaged basins. The statistics improve significantly with calibration of the global model parameters but even for uncalibrated simulations, the WetSpa model reproduces flow rates of acceptable accuracy for most cases. To evaluate the model performance during calibration and validation periods, an Aggregated Measure (AM) is introduced that measures different aspects of the simulated hydrograph such as shape, size and volume. The statistics for the five calibration basins show that the model produces very good to excellent results for the calibration period. With the exception of Blue River basin, the overall model performance for the validation period remains good to very good, indicating that the model is able to simulate the relevant hydrologic processes in the basins accurately. The performance of the uncalibrated model for the subcatchments is more variable, but the hourly flow rates generally reproduced with reasonable accuracy indicating an encouraging performance of the model. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.


Ondrusek M.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Stengel E.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Kinkade C.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Vogel R.,SM Resources Corporation | And 3 more authors.
Remote Sensing of Environment | Year: 2012

Sediment loading is one of the primary threats to the health of the Chesapeake Bay. We have developed a high resolution (250m) ocean color satellite tool to monitor sediment concentrations in the Bay. In situ optical and sediment sampling is used to develop a total suspended matter (TSM) algorithm for the Chesapeake Bay. The Coastal Optical Characterization Experiment (COCE) is part of an ongoing effort to optically characterize processes and to develop regional remote sensing ocean color algorithms in the coastal waters. The goal is to characterize sediment concentrations and to develop a tool to track plumes cascading down the Bay following heavy rainfall events. Background TSM concentrations in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed can also be characterized. The plumes can have potentially devastating effects on the Chesapeake Bay's fragile ecosystem by increasing nutrient loads, depositing sediments, and decreasing salinity and light levels. Sampling took place throughout 2006 to 2008 in the upper and mid portions of the Chesapeake Bay. Measurements of TSM, chlorophyll a (Chl), and hyperspectral optics were collected. The optical measurements included above water surface irradiance (E s(λ)), in-water downwelling irradiance (E d(λ)) and in-water upwelling radiance (L u(λ)). These optical data were used to analyze the performance and utility of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua Band 1 (645nm) for use as a TSM monitoring tool. From the optical measurements we have derived a 3rd order polynomial regression of TSM to normalized water-leaving radiance (r 2=0.79) to form an algorithm that quantitatively relates TSM to the MODIS 250m resolution band 1 (645nm). The algorithm performance was validated (a mean percent difference of -4.2%) against 270 total suspended solids samples collected by the Chesapeake Bay Program during routine water quality monitoring of the Chesapeake Bay environment. The TSM algorithm tool is then used to demonstrate monitoring of significant runoff events that occurred in June, 2006 and March, 2008. In addition, the utility of the Chesapeake Bay TSM product is demonstrated by describing regional and seasonal variations in sediment concentrations throughout the Chesapeake Bay for 2009. Mean concentrations ranged from 11.55mg/l in the upper Chesapeake Bay winter season to 6.37mg/l in the middle Chesapeake Bay spring season. These remote sensing tools can be valuable instruments in the detection and tracking of runoff events and background concentration for monitoring the health and recovery of the Chesapeake Bay. © 2012.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.88K | Year: 2013

Reliable knowledge of soil moisture is required for numerous Army and civilian applications including mobility assessments, flood forecasting, agricultural management, erosion mitigation, and control of vector-borne diseases. Soil moisture cannot be measured at the resolution that is required for these purposes (approx. 30 m grid cells), so a simple but accurate downscaling tool is needed. The purpose of this SBIR project is to develop a commercially-viable downscaling tool with flexible data inputs. The foundation for the proposed tool is the Equilibrium Moisture from Topography modeling framework, which estimates soil moisture from high-resolution topographic data. This approach is simple and relies on universally available data. It is also broad enough to accept additional data inputs if desired by users. In the project, the methodology will be generalized to accept more diverse information, it will be implemented in software that meets the needs of targeted customers, and it will be commercialized in a sustainable manner.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 93.53K | Year: 2010

State governors recognized the need for drought information, which resulted in the implementation of the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Other government efforts provide climate services in order to monitor, forecast, and mitigate the impacts of climate. In response to the SBIR request for a “Robust Software Data Integration Tool in Support of the NIDIS and Climate Services Delivery”, Riverside is proposing the development of a Climate Information Management (CIM) Toolkit. The CIM toolkit will perform data collection, processing, and data product generation functions in support of NIDIS and other climate web portals. The effort will be consistent with existing NIDIS technologies, utilize proven components and new technology, and be demonstrated via a prototype implementation for Colorado. Riverside’s expertise with developing similar systems, and our working relationships with data providers and water suppliers, ensures that technical objectives and user needs will be met by the solution.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 400.00K | Year: 2011

The SBIR solicitation expressed the need for tools to process data from disparate sources in various formats and generate drought-relevant data products. NIDIS also recognizes a need to span organizational boundaries to provide access to integrated drought information for use in water management. The Phase I SBIR project resulted in prototype Climate Information Management Toolkit (CIMT) software that automates data collection, processing, and product generation. Phase II will focus on enhancing the prototype CIMT to a production level suitable for application by local water organizations and NIDIS. Riverside’s relationship with local, regional, and state organizations in Colorado allows for a bottom-up application of these tools, while coordinating with NIDIS pilot projects and agency efforts to meet national goals. Specific tasks include: improved implementation of existing web services, enabling new web services for important local data sets, implementing tools to compute water supply indices and triggers, and enhancing tools to consider climate change in data products. Stakeholders in the water community will have access to these tools, which can be integrated with the NIDIS Drought Portal. Riverside’s track-record with stakeholders, technical expertise, and ability to integrate with ongoing efforts provides an opportunity to demonstrate NIDIS efforts at the local level.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 94.59K | Year: 2014

Climate variability and the increased frequency of climate-related risks are redefining how communities address urban development and planning, Better storm risk assessment will lead directly to better preparedness which will save lives, reduce costs, and increase resiliency. Riverside proposes a data integration and visualization tool that will enable communities to assess climate-related risks, visualize the impacts and potential adaptation measures, and communicate real-time information at a neighborhood scale. Riverside will couple our multi-hazard decision support systems operational expertise with the University of North Carolina (UNC) in Asheville's National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center (NEMAC). The Riverside/NEMAC team will design and develop Application Programming Interface (API) services to dynamically discover, access, and present to users various components of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC's) severe weather database. We propose to create an online application that links the current severe weather data base products, including NCDC's Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI), to social and demographic databases to allow users to assess populations and infrastructure at risk. This is a "connecting technology solution" that will bridge the gap between the rich databases at NCDC and the required application that the end users need.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 400.00K | Year: 2015

In Phase I, Riverside investigated the need for increased access to NCDC storm data using web Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to connect severe weather and socioeconomic information. The focus of Phase I was to design and validate an architecture that specifies the methods through which the NCDC Storm data can be programmatically accessed, processed, and displayed in easy to use interfaces. Phase I market research verified the need for tools and software algorithms for accessing the NCDC data combined with socioeconomic data for the purpose of risk identification and assessment. We have designed a software product to move customers through the process of scoping and identifying climate-and weather-based risks to assets of interest. Through discussions with potential customers we have identified prospective markets for our proposed products. For Phase II, we have identified seven main objectives to create a commercially viable product. These objectives are: Refine Product Requirements, Develop User Interface, Develop API, Acquire Data, Incorporate Additional Datasets, Develop Workflow Framework, and Create Risk Assessment and Calculation Tools.


Trademark
Riverside Technologies Inc. | Date: 2015-06-23

Backpacks especially adapted for holding laptops and notebook computers; Bags and cases specially adapted for holding or carrying portable telephones and telephone equipment and accessories; Carrying cases specially adapted for electronic equipment, namely, laptop computers, notebooks, tablets, cell phones, computers, and projectors; Cell phone covers; Protective covers and cases for tablet computers; Protective display screen covers adapted for use with laptops, cell phones, notebooks, tablets, MP3 players, and portable media players. Backpacks; Business cases; Carrying cases; Document cases.


Trademark
Riverside Technologies Inc. | Date: 2015-06-23

Laptop carrying cases; Notebook computer carrying cases; Protective covers and cases for tablet computers.


Trademark
Riverside Technologies Inc. | Date: 2015-06-23

Backpacks especially adapted for holding laptops and notebook computers; bags and cases specially adapted for holding or carrying portable telephones and telephone equipment and accessories; carrying cases specially adapted for electronic equipment, namely, laptop computers, notebooks, tablets, cell phones, computers, and projectors; laptop carrying cases; notebook computer carrying cases; cell phone covers; protective covers and cases for tablet computers; protective display screen covers adapted for use with laptops, cell phones, notebooks, tablets, MP3 players, and portable media players. Backpacks; business cases; carrying cases; document cases.

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