Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Rotterdam, Netherlands

Santos I.P.,Erasmus Medical Center | Caspers P.J.,Erasmus Medical Center | Bakker Schut T.,Erasmus Medical Center | van Doorn R.,Leiden University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Raman Spectroscopy | Year: 2015

Pigmented tissues are inaccessible to Raman spectroscopy using visible laser light because of the high level of laser-induced tissue fluorescence. The fluorescence contribution to the acquired Raman signal can be reduced by using an excitation wavelength in the near infrared range around 1000nm. This will shift the Raman spectrum above 1100nm, which is the principal upper detection limit for silicon-based CCD detectors. For wavelengths above 1100nm indium gallium arsenide detectors can be used. However, InGaAs detectors have not yet demonstrated satisfactory noise level characteristics for demanding Raman applications. We have tested and implemented for the first time a novel sensitive InGaAs imaging camera with extremely low readout noise for multichannel Raman spectroscopy in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region. The effective readout noise of two electrons is comparable to that of high quality CCDs and two orders of magnitude lower than that of other commercially available InGaAs detector arrays. With an in-house built Raman system we demonstrate detection of shot-noise limited high quality Raman spectra of pigmented samples in the high wavenumber region, whereas a more traditional excitation laser wavelength (671nm) could not generate a useful Raman signal because of high fluorescence. Our Raman instrument makes it possible to substantially decrease fluorescence background and to obtain high quality Raman spectra from pigmented biological samples in integration times well below 20s. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Santos I.P.,Rotterdam University | Caspers P.J.,Rotterdam University | Bakker Schut T.,Rotterdam University | Van Doorn R.,Leiden University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Raman Spectroscopy | Year: 2015

Pigmented tissues are inaccessible to Raman spectroscopy using visible laser light because of the high level of laser-induced tissue fluorescence. The fluorescence contribution to the acquired Raman signal can be reduced by using an excitation wavelength in the near infrared range around 1000 nm. This will shift the Raman spectrum above 1100 nm, which is the principal upper detection limit for silicon-based CCD detectors. For wavelengths above 1100 nm indium gallium arsenide detectors can be used. However, InGaAs detectors have not yet demonstrated satisfactory noise level characteristics for demanding Raman applications. We have tested and implemented for the first time a novel sensitive InGaAs imaging camera with extremely low readout noise for multichannel Raman spectroscopy in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region. The effective readout noise of two electrons is comparable to that of high quality CCDs and two orders of magnitude lower than that of other commercially available InGaAs detector arrays. With an in-house built Raman system we demonstrate detection of shot-noise limited high quality Raman spectra of pigmented samples in the high wavenumber region, whereas a more traditional excitation laser wavelength (671 nm) could not generate a useful Raman signal because of high fluorescence. Our Raman instrument makes it possible to substantially decrease fluorescence background and to obtain high quality Raman spectra from pigmented biological samples in integration times well below 20 s. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Byrne H.J.,Dublin Institute of Technology | Baranska M.,Jagiellonian University | Puppels G.J.,RiverD International | Puppels G.J.,Erasmus Medical Center | And 7 more authors.
Analyst | Year: 2015

Although the potential of vibrational spectroscopy for biomedical applications has been well demonstrated, translation into clinical practice has been relatively slow. This Editorial assesses the challenges facing the field and the potential way forward. While many technological challenges have been addressed to date, considerable effort is still required to gain acceptance of the techniques among the medical community, standardise protocols, extend to a clinically relevant scale, and ultimately assess the health economics underlying clinical deployment. National and international research networks can contribute much to technology development and standardisation. Ultimately, large-scale funding is required to engage in clinical trials and instrument development. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.


RiverD International | Entity website

Classification of cells and tissues Raman Spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique, based on scattering of light by molecules. The sample under investigation is illuminated with low powerlaser light ...


van Smeden J.,Leiden University | Janssens M.,Leiden University | Kaye E.C.J.,Leiden University | Caspers P.J.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | And 4 more authors.
Experimental Dermatology | Year: 2014

An important feature of atopic eczema (AE) is a decreased skin barrier function. The stratum corneum (SC) lipids - comprised of ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol - fulfil a predominant role in the skin barrier function. In this clinical study, the carbon chain length distribution of SC lipids (FFAs and CERs) and their importance for the lipid organization and skin barrier function were examined in AE patients and compared with control subjects. A reduction in FFA chain length and an increase in unsaturated FFAs are observed in non-lesional and lesional SC of AE patients. The reduction in FFA chain length associates with a reduced CER chain length, suggesting a common synthetic pathway. The lipid chain length reduction correlates with a less dense lipid organization and a decreased skin barrier function. All changes are more pronounced in lesional SC compared with non-lesional skin. No association was observed between lipid properties and filaggrin mutations, an important predisposing factor for developing AE. The results of this study demonstrate an altered SC lipid composition and signify the importance of these changes (specifically regarding the CER and FFA chain lengths) for the impaired skin barrier function in AE. This provides insights into epidermal lipid metabolism as well as new opportunities for skin barrier repair. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Discover hidden collaborations