Ripon, WI, United States
Ripon, WI, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best colleges in Wisconsin for 2017. Of the 35 four-year schools who made the list, University of Wisconsin Madison, Marquette University, Saint Norbert College, Viterbo University and Lawrence University ranked the highest. 16 two-year schools also made the list; Chippewa Valley Technical College, Mid-State Technical College, Fox Valley Technical College, Lakeshore Technical College and Western Technical College were determined to be the best five. A full list of all schools is included below. “Strong economic benefits can come from having a highly-educated workforce,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “These Wisconsin schools not only offer quality degree programs that show the value of higher education, they also have demonstrated a commitment to ensuring their students’ post-college success.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Wisconsin” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised on additional data that includes annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, career counseling services, student/teacher ratio, availability of financial aid and graduation rate. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Wisconsin” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Wisconsin for 2017 include: Alverno College Beloit College Cardinal Stritch University Carroll University Carthage College Concordia University-Wisconsin Edgewood College Lakeland College Lawrence University Maranatha Baptist University Marian University Marquette University Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design Milwaukee School of Engineering Mount Mary University Northland College Ottawa University-Milwaukee Ripon College Saint Norbert College Silver Lake College of the Holy Family University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire University of Wisconsin-Green Bay University of Wisconsin-La Crosse University of Wisconsin-Madison University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh University of Wisconsin-Parkside University of Wisconsin-Platteville University of Wisconsin-River Falls University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point University of Wisconsin-Stout University of Wisconsin-Superior University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Viterbo University Wisconsin Lutheran College The Best Two-Year Colleges in Wisconsin for 2017 include: Blackhawk Technical College Chippewa Valley Technical College Fox Valley Technical College Gateway Technical College Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College Lakeshore Technical College Mid-State Technical College Milwaukee Area Technical College Moraine Park Technical College Nicolet College Northcentral Technical College Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Southwest Wisconsin Technical College Waukesha County Technical College Western Technical College Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

A group of teenagers become unlikely heroes in an engaging new novel released by Dog Ear Publishing. “The Sun Jumpers” received a literary award from the publishing company. Idyllwild, CA, April 26, 2017 --( “The Sun Jumpers” begins 10,000 year ago as the Kishoki, cave-dwelling people, are facing extreme hardship, including starvation. Ty, a headstrong young boy, and Sita, who hopes to become the tribe’s next shaman, as well as two of their friends, Ko and Shum, set off on a quest to find a tribe that seems to be thriving. They are armed only with a spear, bone knives, their courage and powder Sita received from their shaman. But when Sita creates a potion to save them, the four friends find themselves in mountains near modern-day Los Angeles. Believing the young people to be a rap group, young filmmaker Darren brings them to his home and shares his love of movies, frozen pizza, skateboarding and the mall. Eventually the dark-skinned prehistoric youths convince him of their true nature, and Darren realizes he must help them find a way back to save their people. Will they make it back in time with a miracle or will Sita’s potion send them to another more dangerous time? Can their courage inspire Darren to stand up against his father and learn how to make his own way in the world? The book, aimed at youths 11 to 14 years old, is appropriate for readers of all ages. Its unforgettable characters and unique story led to its earning the Dog Ear Publishing Award of Literary Excellence. The publishing company’s editorial team determines award winners, with the managing editor, editorial services manager and publisher reviewing recommendations. Winning books include the award logo on their covers. The author, who has been writing all his life, has published two of the four or five novels he has written, and he’s written screenplays for film and television and directed theater, television and movies. Luber has a BA from Ripon College, attended graduate school at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is a graduate Fellow of the American Film Institute in writing and directing. Luber also wrote “Everybody’s Shadow,” a book of poetry. His first novel, “Match to the Heart,” is available on Amazon.com, e-platforms, and bookstores. He is working on a new novel, “Falling From the Sky,” and is working with a composer on “Esperanza – the Musical of Hope.” For additional information and reviews, please visit www. thesunjumpers.com The Sun Jumpers Ken Luber Dog Ear Publishing ISBN: 978-1-4575-5046-1 296 pages $16.99. US Available at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere. Dog Ear Publishing partners with authors to shape content that resonates with readers as diverse as the books we publish. Our mission is to leverage expertise, technology and relationships to form a meaningful and lasting bond between creators, content and culture as a whole. Dog Ear Publishing is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, and can be contacted by phone at (317) 228-3656 or through our website, www.dogearpublishing.net. Idyllwild, CA, April 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- When four teenagers in prehistoric times set out on a vision quest, they have no idea that their lives will change forever. Ken Luber’s new book, “The Sun Jumpers,” takes its readers on a journey of discovery and adventure, interwoven with deeper themes of bigotry, relationships between parents and children, and the power of truth. It has earned the Dog Ear Publishing Award of Literary Excellence.“The Sun Jumpers” begins 10,000 year ago as the Kishoki, cave-dwelling people, are facing extreme hardship, including starvation. Ty, a headstrong young boy, and Sita, who hopes to become the tribe’s next shaman, as well as two of their friends, Ko and Shum, set off on a quest to find a tribe that seems to be thriving.They are armed only with a spear, bone knives, their courage and powder Sita received from their shaman. But when Sita creates a potion to save them, the four friends find themselves in mountains near modern-day Los Angeles.Believing the young people to be a rap group, young filmmaker Darren brings them to his home and shares his love of movies, frozen pizza, skateboarding and the mall. Eventually the dark-skinned prehistoric youths convince him of their true nature, and Darren realizes he must help them find a way back to save their people. Will they make it back in time with a miracle or will Sita’s potion send them to another more dangerous time? Can their courage inspire Darren to stand up against his father and learn how to make his own way in the world?The book, aimed at youths 11 to 14 years old, is appropriate for readers of all ages. Its unforgettable characters and unique story led to its earning the Dog Ear Publishing Award of Literary Excellence. The publishing company’s editorial team determines award winners, with the managing editor, editorial services manager and publisher reviewing recommendations. Winning books include the award logo on their covers.The author, who has been writing all his life, has published two of the four or five novels he has written, and he’s written screenplays for film and television and directed theater, television and movies. Luber has a BA from Ripon College, attended graduate school at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is a graduate Fellow of the American Film Institute in writing and directing.Luber also wrote “Everybody’s Shadow,” a book of poetry. His first novel, “Match to the Heart,” is available on Amazon.com, e-platforms, and bookstores. He is working on a new novel, “Falling From the Sky,” and is working with a composer on “Esperanza – the Musical of Hope.”For additional information and reviews, please visit www. thesunjumpers.comThe Sun JumpersKen LuberDog Ear PublishingISBN: 978-1-4575-5046-1 296 pages $16.99. USAvailable at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere.Dog Ear Publishing partners with authors to shape content that resonates with readers as diverse as the books we publish. Our mission is to leverage expertise, technology and relationships to form a meaningful and lasting bond between creators, content and culture as a whole. Dog Ear Publishing is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, and can be contacted by phone at (317) 228-3656 or through our website, www.dogearpublishing.net. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Dog Ear Publishing


McMurray B.,University of Iowa | Kovack-Lesh K.A.,Ripon College | Goodwin D.,Ripon College | McEchron W.,University of Iowa
Cognition | Year: 2013

Infant directed speech (IDS) is a speech register characterized by simpler sentences, a slower rate, and more variable prosody. Recent work has implicated it in more subtle aspects of language development. Kuhl et al. (1997) demonstrated that segmental cues for vowels are affected by IDS in a way that may enhance development: the average locations of the extreme "point" vowels (/a/, /i/ and /u/) are further apart in acoustic space. If infants learn speech categories, in part, from the statistical distributions of such cues, these changes may specifically enhance speech category learning. We revisited this by asking (1) if these findings extend to a new cue (Voice Onset Time, a cue for voicing); (2) whether they extend to the interior vowels which are much harder to learn and/or discriminate; and (3) whether these changes may be an unintended phonetic consequence of factors like speaking rate or prosodic changes associated with IDS. Eighteen caregivers were recorded reading a picture book including minimal pairs for voicing (e.g., beach/. peach) and a variety of vowels to either an adult or their infant. Acoustic measurements suggested that VOT was different in IDS, but not in a way that necessarily supports better development, and that these changes are almost entirely due to slower rate of speech of IDS. Measurements of the vowel suggested that in addition to changes in the mean, there was also an increase in variance, and statistical modeling suggests that this may counteract the benefit of any expansion of the vowel space. As a whole this suggests that changes in segmental cues associated with IDS may be an unintended by-product of the slower rate of speech and different prosodic structure, and do not necessarily derive from a motivation to enhance development. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Kovack-Lesh K.A.,Ripon College | Oakes L.M.,University of California at Davis | McMurray B.,University of Iowa
Infancy | Year: 2012

We examined how infants' categorization is jointly influenced by previous experience and how much they shift their gaze back and forth between stimuli. Extending previous findings reported by K. A. Kovack-Lesh, J. S. Horst, and L. M. Oakes (2008), we found that 4-month-old infants' (N=122) learning of the exclusive category of cats was related to whether they had cats at home and how much they shifted attention between two available stimuli during familiarization. Individual differences in attention assessed in an unrelated task were not related to their categorization. Thus, infants' learning is multiply influenced by past experience and online attentional style. © International Society on Infant Studies (ISIS).


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Travel Back in Time with Award-Winning New Novel by Ken Luber Dog Ear Publishing reviews a new award-winning novel starring a teenage couple and their two friends, who set out to save their Stone Age clan but end up in the 21st century. Idyllwild, CA, December 27, 2016 --( “I’m proud of the fact that it got the award,” he said. “Proud of getting an excellent review in Kirkus (Reviews). And I’m especially proud of what they said about the characters – that they were very endearing. I really liked that part because I worked very hard at making them relatable and interesting people. Besides plot – some genre books have such a heavy plot – you read it for the characters.” Dog Ear’s editorial team determines award winners, with the managing editor, editorial services manager and publisher reviewing recommendations. Winning books include the award logo on their covers. As Dog Ear editor Reba Hilbert wrote in her recommendation, "I'm giving this book a 5. It's a smooth, perfectly paced novel with witty dialogue and incredibly endearing characters. The author combines the hilarity of four cave-teens transported to a modern world with the deeper themes of courage, integrity, loyalty, and love.” Kirkus Reviews calls the novel “a lighthearted romp that’s permeated by humor regarding adolescent antics, 20-something angst, and a wealth of inevitable culture-clash misunderstandings. But it also deals with some serious issues, including modern-day bigotry (the Kishoki are a dark-skinned people), the sometimes-troubled relationships between parents and offspring, and the need to find and follow one’s own truth.” “The Sun Jumpers” begins 10,000 years ago, with cave-dwelling people facing extinction. “This boy (Ty) gets with his buddies – he’s very macho about it. His girlfriend (Sita) insists on going with them and the four of them set off into the unknown. They wind up in LA in the 21st century with a young filmmaker (Darren) whose father is rich,” Luber said. They end up teaching Darren the importance of standing up against his father and getting out from under his father’s yoke – just as Ty has done. “One of the other things you get from the book is we’re all part of the same family whether it’s 10,000 years ago or now,” the author said. Writing the book had its challenges, including cutting it from 145,000 words to 85,000 words to provide more focus. “The other challenge was that actually I started it with the boy as a central character – he is the one who has the vision and wants to find a better life,” Luber said. “But as soon as his sweetheart opened her mouth, she kind of took over the book and I couldn’t stop her. … She had to butt into everything. I had to fight for him.” A book signing took place Dec. 10 at a local café. His wife, Kathleen, has been spreading news about the book via Facebook, and a copy is in the local library system. “I want people to enjoy it, and I really think they will,” he said, adding that a local librarian is part of GoodReads and read the book a while back in draft form, and she loved it. Luber would like school libraries to carry the book, which is aimed at youths 11 to 14 years old. “But I think adults will enjoy it and older teenagers will enjoy it because of the female character – she’s very strong; she’s the shaman in waiting. She saves the boys, actually, before they get to the new world. And (Ty) saves everybody” with what he brings back from the future. It’s not the first time Luber has worked with Dog Ear – he also published a book through the company about seven years ago. He said all staff have been very helpful at each step of the publishing process. “You want assistance. You want them to be helpful and engaging, and they were.” Luber, who has been writing all his life, lives in the mountain village of Idyllwild. He’s published two of the four or five novels he has written, and he’s written screenplays for film and television and directed theater, television and movies. He has a BA from Ripon College, attended graduate school at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is a graduate Fellow of the American Film Institute in writing and directing. Luber also wrote “Everybody’s Shadow,” a book of poetry. His first novel, “Match to the Heart,” is available on Amazon.com, e-platforms, and bookstores. He is writing a new novel, “Falling From the Sky,” and is working with a composer on “Esperanza – the Musical of Hope.” For additional information, please visit www.thesunjumpers.com The Sun Jumpers Ken Luber Dog Ear Publishing ISBN: 978-1-4575-5046-1 296 pages $16.99 US Available at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere. Idyllwild, CA, December 27, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Strong characters help drive the story in Ken Luber’s latest work, “The Sun Jumpers.” It’s those same characters that led to his novel earning the Dog Ear Publishing Award of Literary Excellence, and the author couldn’t be happier.“I’m proud of the fact that it got the award,” he said. “Proud of getting an excellent review in Kirkus (Reviews). And I’m especially proud of what they said about the characters – that they were very endearing. I really liked that part because I worked very hard at making them relatable and interesting people. Besides plot – some genre books have such a heavy plot – you read it for the characters.”Dog Ear’s editorial team determines award winners, with the managing editor, editorial services manager and publisher reviewing recommendations. Winning books include the award logo on their covers.As Dog Ear editor Reba Hilbert wrote in her recommendation, "I'm giving this book a 5. It's a smooth, perfectly paced novel with witty dialogue and incredibly endearing characters. The author combines the hilarity of four cave-teens transported to a modern world with the deeper themes of courage, integrity, loyalty, and love.”Kirkus Reviews calls the novel “a lighthearted romp that’s permeated by humor regarding adolescent antics, 20-something angst, and a wealth of inevitable culture-clash misunderstandings. But it also deals with some serious issues, including modern-day bigotry (the Kishoki are a dark-skinned people), the sometimes-troubled relationships between parents and offspring, and the need to find and follow one’s own truth.”“The Sun Jumpers” begins 10,000 years ago, with cave-dwelling people facing extinction. “This boy (Ty) gets with his buddies – he’s very macho about it. His girlfriend (Sita) insists on going with them and the four of them set off into the unknown. They wind up in LA in the 21st century with a young filmmaker (Darren) whose father is rich,” Luber said. They end up teaching Darren the importance of standing up against his father and getting out from under his father’s yoke – just as Ty has done.“One of the other things you get from the book is we’re all part of the same family whether it’s 10,000 years ago or now,” the author said.Writing the book had its challenges, including cutting it from 145,000 words to 85,000 words to provide more focus. “The other challenge was that actually I started it with the boy as a central character – he is the one who has the vision and wants to find a better life,” Luber said. “But as soon as his sweetheart opened her mouth, she kind of took over the book and I couldn’t stop her. … She had to butt into everything. I had to fight for him.”A book signing took place Dec. 10 at a local café. His wife, Kathleen, has been spreading news about the book via Facebook, and a copy is in the local library system. “I want people to enjoy it, and I really think they will,” he said, adding that a local librarian is part of GoodReads and read the book a while back in draft form, and she loved it.Luber would like school libraries to carry the book, which is aimed at youths 11 to 14 years old. “But I think adults will enjoy it and older teenagers will enjoy it because of the female character – she’s very strong; she’s the shaman in waiting. She saves the boys, actually, before they get to the new world. And (Ty) saves everybody” with what he brings back from the future.It’s not the first time Luber has worked with Dog Ear – he also published a book through the company about seven years ago. He said all staff have been very helpful at each step of the publishing process. “You want assistance. You want them to be helpful and engaging, and they were.”Luber, who has been writing all his life, lives in the mountain village of Idyllwild. He’s published two of the four or five novels he has written, and he’s written screenplays for film and television and directed theater, television and movies. He has a BA from Ripon College, attended graduate school at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is a graduate Fellow of the American Film Institute in writing and directing.Luber also wrote “Everybody’s Shadow,” a book of poetry. His first novel, “Match to the Heart,” is available on Amazon.com, e-platforms, and bookstores. He is writing a new novel, “Falling From the Sky,” and is working with a composer on “Esperanza – the Musical of Hope.”For additional information, please visit www.thesunjumpers.comThe Sun JumpersKen LuberDog Ear PublishingISBN: 978-1-4575-5046-1 296 pages $16.99 USAvailable at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Dog Ear Publishing


Huber S.M.,TU Munich | Scanlon J.D.,Ripon College | Jimenez-Izal E.,Donostia International Physics Center | Ugalde J.M.,Donostia International Physics Center | Infante I.,Donostia International Physics Center
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics | Year: 2013

The origin of the high directionality of halogen bonding was investigated quantum chemically by a detailed comparison of typical adducts in two different orientations: linear (most stable) and perpendicular. Energy decomposition analyses revealed that the synergy between charge-transfer interactions and Pauli repulsion are the driving forces for the directionality, while electrostatic contributions are more favourable in the less-stable, perpendicular orientation. © 2013 the Owner Societies.


Using a bistable apparent-motion display, Odic and Pratt (2008, Perception 37 1790-1804) have recently presented data that they interpret as being inconsistent with what they call "the two-process theory". Instead, they argue, their data can be explained by the differential-activation theory along with a process they identify as "temporal summation of contrast". It is argued here that Odic and Pratt misinterpreted the two-process distinction and used a display that was too unusual to be adequately addressed by it. Further, their use of the differential-activation theory and, in particular, the temporal summation of contrast, seems problematic. It is concluded that there is little in their data and theoretical interpretation to justify rejection of the two-process approach.


The invention provides methods and intermediates that are useful for preparing -branched aryl phthalimides and -branched aryl amines.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 237.38K | Year: 2014

With this award from the Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI) and support from the Chemistry Research Instrumentation Program (CRIF), Professor Patrick Willoughby from Ripon College and colleagues Colleen Byron and Robert Wallace will acquire a liquid chromatograph, time-of-flight mass spectrometer capable of providing accurate mass (LCMS-TOF-accurate mass). In general, mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the key analytical methods used to identify and characterize small quantities of chemical species embedded in complex matrices. In a typical experiment, the components flow into a mass spectrometer where they are ionized into the parent ion and its fragment ions and their masses are measured. This highly sensitive technique allows detection and determination of the structure of molecules in a complex mixture. An instrument with a liquid chromatograph provides additional structural identification power by separating mixtures of compounds before they reach the mass spectrometer. As a primarily undergraduate institution, Ripons faculty embraces undergraduate research experiences as one of the most important outcomes of their research activities. The proposed instrument will directly impact the research experiences of a large number of students within the three-year project period, and many more in years to come. Undergraduate researchers will participate in activities with high schools. This instrument will also be shared with researchers from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh as well as those from Lawrence University.

The award is aimed at enhancing research and education at all levels, especially in areas such as (a) developing new organic synthesis methodology involving acyl radicals and photoredox catalysis; (b) optimizing conditions for the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of o-benzyne with a carbonyl ylide; (c) study the effects of byproducts of reactive oxygen species on electron-transferring proteins; and (d) studying the effect of lipid profiles on rotifer survival and the unpalatability of rotifer colonies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: PHYLOGENETIC SYSTEMATICS | Award Amount: 106.25K | Year: 2013

Rotifers are critical members of freshwater communities because of their important roles in energy and nutrient cycling. Rotifers have also proven to be valuable models for aging and toxicology studies, and are a key early diverging lineage for understanding the pattern of evolution within the animal clade. Despite this importance, rotifer species remain difficult to identify and few phylogenetic relationships within the clade are well supported. This collaborative effort linking researchers at the University of Texas El Paso, University of Massachusetts Lowell and Ripon College will increase phylogenetic and taxonomic resolution within phylum Rotifera by using a combination of advanced molecular and morphological techniques. This research will result in a new phylogenetic classification for the clade, in addition to insights into the rates of molecular evolution and the rates and drivers of cryptic speciation within the rotifer lineage.

The project will provide scientific training focused on rotifer systematics to graduate and undergraduate students at each of the three collaborating institutions. An undergraduate laboratory module, newly designed museum exhibit, and scientific workshops will all help disseminate the results broadly. The public will be able to access an interactive tutorial and key to rotifer species, plus other results from the project via the Encyclopedia of Life website.

Loading Ripon College collaborators
Loading Ripon College collaborators