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Denver, CO, United States

Weingardt R.G.,Richard Weingardt Consultants Inc.
Leadership and Management in Engineering | Year: 2011

Conde Balcom McCullough, one of America's greatest bridge engineers, made possible Oregon Coast Highway in mid-1930's amid the Great Depression. McCullough's other achievements include hundreds of gracefully arched spans that established Oregon's blue highways as being one of the nation's most recognized highway systems of all time. McCullough's accomplishments as Oregon's bridge engineer made him the BPR's logical choice to design and build several challenging bridges for the Inter-American Highway. The American Institute of Steel Construction named McCullough's John McLoughlin Bridge over the Clackamas River its most meritorious structure of 1933, and in 1934 McCullough was granted an honorary doctor of engineering degree from OSU. After World War II, the BPR asked McCullough to return to Central America to continue work on the Inter-American Highway. Source


Weingardt R.G.,Richard Weingardt Consultants Inc.
Leadership and Management in Engineering | Year: 2013

The most celebrated Confederate general of the American Civil War (1861-1865), Robert Edward Lee, was and remains a bigger-than-life historic figure. Nicknamed the 'Marble Man,' the tall lean Virginian came to be even more revered among Southerners after his surrender to superior Union Army forces than he had been during the war Lee was the one soldier in whom most of the higher officers of the Army of the Potomac had complete, undiluted admiration. Among the many achievements of that remarkable man, nothing is much more striking than his ability to dominant the minds of the men who were fighting against him. On July 1, 1825, an eager, serious-minded 18-year-old Virginian entered the US Military Academy at West Point, New York, with plans of studying science and engineering. Entering the academy the same year as Lee was his academic equal, a New Yorker, two years his senior, Charles Mason. Source


Weingardt R.G.,Richard Weingardt Consultants Inc.
Leadership and Management in Engineering | Year: 2010

Two bright, pioneering Iowa farm girls who have earned civil engineering degrees from Iowa State University (ISU) are Elmina who received a master's degree (MSCE) and her younger sister Alda who was awarded a bachelor's degree (BSCE). Elmina become an engineer due to her interest in mathematics and surveying, while Alda was committed to pursuing an education in engineering. In 1903 and 1904, Elmina took an year's break from her duties at ISU so that she and Alda could travel to Europe to study noteworthy architecture and engineering works. In 1916, Elmina and Alda, as a team, prepared the architectural and engineering drawings for the Teachers Cottage or Helmich House at the Arrowmont Arts and Crafts School in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Elmina was also the more prolific writer, producing numerous articles and papers dealing with the modernization of rural home designs and improvement of sanitation conditions on farms. Source


Weingardt R.G.,Richard Weingardt Consultants Inc.
Leadership and Management in Engineering | Year: 2010

Leonardo da Vinci was an expert in engineering and his extensive study of all the natural sciences greatly added to his significance as an exceptional painter and sculptor. His in-depth writings and many inventions put him well ahead of his time in mathematics, geometry, optics, mechanics, geology, hydraulics, engineering, technology, and architecture. His paintings, the Mona Lisa and the Last Supper are ranked among the most famous and widely recognized works of art in the world. He made diversified countless inventions including flying machines, gliders, helicopters, parachutes, street lighting systems and city planning advances. His collection of manuscripts, which were apparently meant to be a great encyclopedia of knowledge, contained everything from the movement of the water and the study of light to the analysis of building structures and the mechanics of flight. The only major bridge structure ever built in October 2001 using his engineering plans was the Leonardo Bridge in Norway. Source


Weingardt R.G.,Richard Weingardt Consultants Inc.
Leadership and Management in Engineering | Year: 2011

The contributions of William J. Wilgus in designing and constructing the Grand Central Terminal in New York are discussed. The Grand Central Terminal was completed after undergouing construction for a period of 13 years. The magnificent complex became the city's most important transportation hub, linking long distance and commuter trains to New York's network of subways, elevated trains, and streetcars. William J. Wilgus also made significant contributions in several significant advancements in the rail transport sector in the US. He was involved in the construction of the two-story-deep underground rail yard and an intricate maze of underground structural systems. These above-the-terminal structures helped offset and finance the immense construction cost of the complex by using 'air rights' leasing concepts. Source

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