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Schafer D.,Vienna University of Technology | Eisenmenger-Sittner C.,Vienna University of Technology | Chirtoc M.,University of Reims Champagne Ardenne | Kijamnajsuk P.,University of Reims Champagne Ardenne | And 4 more authors.
Surface and Coatings Technology | Year: 2011

The manipulation of mechanical and thermal interfaces is essential for the design of modern composites. Amongst these are copper carbon composites which can exhibit excellent heat conductivities if the Cu/C interface is affected by a suitable interlayer to minimize the Thermal Contact Resistance (TCR) and to maximize the adhesion strength between Cu and C. In this paper we report on the effect of boron based interlayers on wetting, mechanical adhesion and on the TCR of Cu coatings deposited on glassy carbon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The interlayers were 5. nm thick and consisted of pure B and B with additions of the carbide forming metals Mo, Ti and Cr in the range of 5. at.% relative to B. The interlayers were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering from either a pure B target or from a composite target. The interlayer composition was checked by Auger Electron Spectroscopy and found to be homogenous within the whole film. The system C-substrate/interlayer/Cu coating was characterized in as deposited samples and samples heat treated for 30. min at 800 °C under High Vacuum (HV), which mimics typical hot pressing parameters during composite formation. Material transport during heat treatment was investigated by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The de-wetting and hole formation in the Cu coating upon heat treatment were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The adhesion of the Cu coating was evaluated by mechanical pull-off testing. The TCR was assessed by infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR). A correlation between the adhesion strength and the value of the TCR which was measured by PTR was determined for as deposited as well as for heat treated samples. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source

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