Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France
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Feldkamp M.L.,University of Utah | Botto L.D.,University of Utah | Amar E.,Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA | Bakker M.K.,University of Groningen | And 17 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

Cloacal exstrophy presents as a complex abdominal wall defect thought to result from a mesodermal abnormality. Anatomically, its main components are Omphalocele, bladder Exstrophy and Imperforate anus. Other associated malformations include renal malformations and Spine defects (OEIS complex). Historically, the prevalence ranges from 1 in 200,000 to 400,000 births, with higher rates in females. Cloacal exstrophy is likely etiologically heterogeneous as suggested by its recurrence in families and occurrence in monozygotic twins. The defect has been described in infants with limb-body wall, with trisomy 18, and in one pregnancy exposed to Dilantin and diazepam. Due to its rarity, the use of a nonspecific diagnostic code for case identification, and lack of validation of the clinical findings, cloacal exstrophy remains an epidemiologic challenge. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence, associated anomalies and maternal characteristics among infants born with cloacal exstrophy. We used data from the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research submitted from 18 birth defect surveillance programs representing 24 countries. Cases were clinically evaluated locally and reviewed centrally by two authors. Cases of persistent cloaca were excluded. A total of 186 cases of cloacal exstrophy were identified. Overall prevalence was 1 in 131,579 births: ranging from 1 in 44,444 births in Wales to 1 in 269,464 births in South America. Live birth prevalence was 1 in 184,195 births. Prevalence ratios did not vary by maternal age. Forty-two (22.6%) cases met the criteria for the OEIS complex, whereas 60 (32.3%) were classified as OEI and 18 (9.7%) as EIS (one with suspected VATER (0.5%)). Other findings included two cases with trisomy 13 (one without a karyotype confirmation), one with mosaic trisomy 12 (0.5%), one with mosaic 45,X (0.5%) and one classified as having amnion band sequence (0.5%). Twenty-seven (14.5%) infants had other anomalies unrelated to cloacal exstrophy. Cloacal exstrophy is a rare anomaly with variability in prevalence by geographic location. The proportion of cases classified as OEIS complex was lower in this study than previously reported. Among all cases, 54.8% were reported to have an omphalocele. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Nassar N.,University of Sydney | Amar E.,Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA | Arteaga-Vazquez J.,Instituto Nacional Of Ciencias Medicas Y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran | Bakker M.K.,University of Groningen | And 23 more authors.
Birth Defects Research Part A - Clinical and Molecular Teratology | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of esophageal atresia (EA) has been shown to vary across different geographical settings. Investigation of geographical differences may provide an insight into the underlying etiology of EA. METHODS: The study population comprised infants diagnosed with EA during 1998 to 2007 from 18 of the 46 birth defects surveillance programs, members of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research. Total prevalence per 10,000 births for EA was defined as the total number of cases in live births, stillbirths, and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (ETOPFA) divided by the total number of all births in the population. RESULTS: Among the participating programs, a total of 2943 cases of EA were diagnosed with an average prevalence of 2.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.35-2.53) per 10,000 births, ranging between 1.77 and 3.68 per 10,000 births. Of all infants diagnosed with EA, 2761 (93.8%) were live births, 82 (2.8%) stillbirths, 89 (3.0%) ETOPFA, and 11 (0.4%) had unknown outcomes. The majority of cases (2020, 68.6%), had a reported EA with fistula, 749 (25.5%) were without fistula, and 174 (5.9%) were registered with an unspecified code. CONCLUSIONS: On average, EA affected 1 in 4099 births (95% CI, 1 in 3954-4251 births) with prevalence varying across different geographical settings, but relatively consistent over time and comparable between surveillance programs. Findings suggest that differences in the prevalence observed among programs are likely to be attributable to variability in population ethnic compositions or issues in reporting or registration procedures of EA, rather than a real risk occurrence difference. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Orioli I.M.,Institute Biologia | Orioli I.M.,Inagemp Instituto Nacional Of Genetica Medica Populacional | Amar E.,Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA | Arteaga-Vazquez J.,Instituto Nacional Of Ciencias Medicas Y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran | And 19 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

Sirenomelia is a very rare limb anomaly in which the normally paired lower limbs are replaced by a single midline limb. This study describes the prevalence, associated malformations, and maternal characteristics among cases with sirenomelia. Data originated from 19 birth defect surveillance system members of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research, and were reported according to a single pre-established protocol. Cases were clinically evaluated locally and reviewed centrally. A total of 249 cases with sirenomelia were identified among 25,290,172 births, for a prevalence of 0.98 per 100,000, with higher prevalence in the Mexican registry. An increase of sirenomelia prevalence with maternal age less than 20 years was statistically significant. The proportion of twinning was 9%, higher than the 1% expected. Sex was ambiguous in 47% of cases, and no different from expectation in the rest. The proportion of cases born alive, premature, and weighting less than 2,500g were 47%, 71.2%, and 88.2%, respectively. Half of the cases with sirenomelia also presented with genital, large bowel, and urinary defects. About 10-15% of the cases had lower spinal column defects, single or anomalous umbilical artery, upper limb, cardiac, and central nervous system defects. There was a greater than expected association of sirenomelia with other very rare defects such as bladder exstrophy, cyclopia/holoprosencephaly, and acardia-acephalus. The application of the new biological network analysis approach, including molecular results, to these associated very rare diseases is suggested for future studies. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Bermejo-Sanchez E.,Instituto Of Investigacion Of Enfermedades Raras Iier | Bermejo-Sanchez E.,Institute Salud Carlos III ISCIII | Bermejo-Sanchez E.,CIBER ISCIII | Cuevas L.,Institute Salud Carlos III ISCIII | And 22 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

This study describes the epidemiology of congenital amelia (absence of limb/s), using the largest series of cases known to date. Data were gathered by 20 surveillance programs on congenital anomalies, all International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research members, from all continents but Africa, from 1968 to 2006, depending on the program. Reported clinical information on cases was thoroughly reviewed to identify those strictly meeting the definition of amelia. Those with amniotic bands or limb-body wall complex were excluded. The primary epidemiological analyses focused on isolated cases and those with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). A total of 326 amelia cases were ascertained among 23,110,591 live births, stillbirths and (for some programs) elective terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomalies. The overall total prevalence was 1.41 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval: 1.26-1.57). Only China Beijing and Mexico RYVEMCE had total prevalences, which were significantly higher than this overall total prevalence. Some under-registration could influence the total prevalence in some programs. Liveborn cases represented 54.6% of total. Among monomelic cases (representing 65.2% of nonsyndromic amelia cases), both sides were equally involved, and the upper limbs (53.9%) were slightly more frequently affected. One of the most interesting findings was a higher prevalence of amelia among offspring of mothers younger than 20 years. Sixty-nine percent of the cases had MCA or syndromes. The most frequent defects associated with amelia were other types of musculoskeletal defects, intestinal, some renal and genital defects, oral clefts, defects of cardiac septa, and anencephaly. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Siffel C.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Correa A.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Amar E.,Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA | Bakker M.K.,University of Groningen | And 21 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

Bladder exstrophy (BE) is a complex congenital anomaly characterized by a defect in the closure of the lower abdominal wall and bladder. We aimed to provide an overview of the literature and conduct an epidemiologic study to describe the prevalence, and maternal and case characteristics of BE. We used data from 22 participating member programs of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR). All cases were reviewed and classified as isolated, syndrome, and multiple congenital anomalies. We estimated the total prevalence of BE and calculated the frequency and odds ratios for various maternal and case characteristics. A total of 546 cases with BE were identified among 26,355,094 births. The total prevalence of BE was 2.07 per 100,000 births (95% CI: 1.90-2.25) and varied between 0.52 and 4.63 among surveillance programs participating in the study. BE was nearly twice as common among male as among female cases. The proportion of isolated cases was 71%. Prevalence appeared to increase with increasing categories of maternal age, particularly among isolated cases. The total prevalence of BE showed some variations by geographical region, which is most likely attributable to differences in registration of cases. The higher total prevalence among male cases and older mothers, especially among isolated cases, warrants further attention. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Mutchinick O.M.,Instituto Nacional Of Ciencias Medicas Y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran | Luna-Munoz L.,Instituto Nacional Of Ciencias Medicas Y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran | Amar E.,Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA | Bakker M.K.,University of Groningen | And 20 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

Conjoined twins (CT) are a very rare developmental accident of uncertain etiology. Prevalence has been previously estimated to be 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 100,000 births. The process by which monozygotic twins do not fully separate but form CT is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to analyze diverse epidemiological aspects of CT, including the different variables listed in the Introduction Section of this issue of the Journal. The study was made possible using the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR) structure. This multicenter worldwide research includes the largest sample of CT ever studied. A total of 383 carefully reviewed sets of CT obtained from 26,138,837 births reported by 21 Clearinghouse Surveillance Programs (SP) were included in the analysis. Total prevalence was 1.47 per 100,000 births (95% CI: 1.32-1.62). Salient findings including an evident variation in prevalence among SPs: a marked variation in the type of pregnancy outcome, a similarity in the proportion of CT types among programs: a significant female predominance in CT: particularly of the thoracopagus type and a significant male predominance in parapagus and parasitic types: significant differences in prevalence by ethnicity and an apparent increasing prevalence trend in South American countries. No genetic, environmental or demographic significant associated factors were identified. Further work in epidemiology and molecular research is necessary to understand the etiology and pathogenesis involved in the development of this fascinating phenomenon of nature. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Bermejo-Sanchez E.,Instituto Of Investigacion Of Enfermedades Raras Iier | Bermejo-Sanchez E.,Institute Salud Carlos III ISCIII | Bermejo-Sanchez E.,CIBER ISCIII | Cuevas L.,Institute Salud Carlos III ISCIII | And 21 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

Epidemiologic data on phocomelia are scarce. This study presents an epidemiologic analysis of the largest series of phocomelia cases known to date. Data were provided by 19 birth defect surveillance programs, all members of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research. Depending on the program, data corresponded to a period from 1968 through 2006. A total of 22,740,933 live births, stillbirths and, for some programs, elective terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (ETOPFA) were monitored. After a detailed review of clinical data, only true phocomelia cases were included. Descriptive data are presented and additional analyses compared isolated cases with those with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), excluding syndromes. We also briefly compared congenital anomalies associated with nonsyndromic phocomelia with those presented with amelia, another rare severe congenital limb defect. A total of 141 phocomelia cases registered gave an overall total prevalence of 0.62 per 100,000 births (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.73). Three programs (Australia Victoria, South America ECLAMC, Italy North East) had significantly different prevalence estimates. Most cases (53.2%) had isolated phocomelia, while 9.9% had syndromes. Most nonsyndromic cases were monomelic (55.9%), with an excess of left (64.9%) and upper limb (64.9%) involvement. Most nonsyndromic cases (66.9%) were live births; most isolated cases (57.9%) weighed more than 2,499g; most MCA (60.7%) weighed less than 2,500g, and were more likely stillbirths (30.8%) or ETOPFA (15.4%) than isolated cases. The most common associated defects were musculoskeletal, cardiac, and intestinal. Epidemiological differences between phocomelia and amelia highlighted possible differences in their causes. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Botto L.D.,University of Utah | Feldkamp M.L.,University of Utah | Amar E.,Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA | Carey J.C.,University of Utah | And 17 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

Acardia is a severe, complex malformation of monozygotic twinning, but beyond clinical case series, very few epidemiologic data are available. The goals of this study were to assess the epidemiologic characteristics of acardia from birth defect registries in the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (Clearinghouse), and compare these findings to current literature. The study included 17 surveillance programs of the Clearinghouse representing 23 countries from North and South America, Europe, China, and Australia. Anonymized individual records with clinical and demographic data were reviewed centrally by clinical geneticists. A literature search was performed. A total of 164 cases of acardia were reported from an underlying cohort of 21.2 million births. Of these, 23% were elective pregnancy terminations. Rates did not vary significantly by maternal age. For many cases, information on pregnancy exposures and genetic testing was missing. However, these limited data did not suggest high rates of chronic illnesses (diabetes, seizure disorders) or lifestyle factors such as smoking. One case had trisomy 13. Major malformations were reported in 2.4% of co-twins. With some basic assumptions, the total prevalence of acardia was estimated at 1 in 50,000-70,000 births, and 1 in 200-280 monozygotic twins. In summary, acardia is a dramatic, probably underreported, and incompletely understood malformation. Studies on its epidemiology and etiology are challenging and still rare. An international collaboration of epidemiologists, clinicians, and geneticists is necessary to understand the etiology, pathogenesis, and occurrence of this severe malformation complex. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Orioli I.M.,Institute Biologia | Orioli I.M.,Instituto Nacional Of Genetica Medica Populacional | Amar E.,Rhone Alps Registry of Birth Defects REMERA | Bakker M.K.,University of Groningen | And 19 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2011

Cyclopia is characterized by the presence of a single eye, with varying degrees of doubling of the intrinsic ocular structures, located in the middle of the face. It is the severest facial expression of the holoprosencephaly (HPE) spectrum. This study describes the prevalence, associated malformations, and maternal characteristics among cases with cyclopia. Data originated in 20 Clearinghouse (ICBDSR) affiliated birth defect surveillance systems, reported according to a single pre-established protocol. A total of 257 infants with cyclopia were identified. Overall prevalence was 1 in 100,000 births (95%CI: 0.89-1.14), with only one program being out of range. Across sites, there was no correlation between cyclopia prevalence and number of births (r=0.08; P=0.75) or proportion of elective termination of pregnancy (r=-0.01; P=0.97). The higher prevalence of cyclopia among older mothers (older than 34) was not statistically significant. The majority of cases were liveborn (122/200; 61%) and females predominated (male/total: 42%). A substantial proportion of cyclopias (31%) were caused by chromosomal anomalies, mainly trisomy 13. Another 31% of the cases of cyclopias were associated with defects not typically related to HPE, with more hydrocephalus, heterotaxia defects, neural tube defects, and preaxial reduction defects than the chromosomal group, suggesting the presence of ciliopathies or other unrecognized syndromes. Cyclopia is a very rare defect without much variability in prevalence by geographic location. The heterogeneous etiology with a high prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities, and female predominance in HPE, were confirmed, but no effect of increased maternal age or association with twinning was observed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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