Providence, RI, United States
Providence, RI, United States

Rhode Island School of Design is a fine arts and design college located in Providence, in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. It has been ranked among the world's best art and design universities and usually alternates or ties with Yale University as the top art school in the country.Founded in 1877, it is located at the base of College Hill; the RISD campus is contiguous with the Brown University campus. The two institutions share social, academic, and community resources and offer joint courses. Applicants to RISD are required to complete RISD's famous two-drawing "hometest", one of which involves the trademark RISD bicycle drawing. It includes about 350 faculty and curators, and 400 staff members. About 1,880 undergraduates and 370 graduate students enroll from all over the United States and 50 other countries. It offers 16 undergraduate majors and 17 graduate majors. RISD is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design , a consortium of thirty-six leading art schools in the United States. It also maintains over 80,000 works of art in the RISD Museum. Wikipedia.


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News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

This crucial hire supports the global expansion strategy of the company as an electronic payments leader IMPESA®, developers of Monibyte®, an innovative SaaS solution for corporate payment methods, and first in a suite of FinTech applications, announces that kHyal has been named Chief Marketing Officer as part of an ongoing commitment to their strategic global expansion plan. Mario Hernández, Impesa’s founder, Chairman and CEO explained that bringing kHyal on as CMO is part of a focused plan to develop and unify the company’s brand voice and market reach, while launching new and existing products across international channels. “We couldn't be happier with kHyal joining our team. kHyal brings amazing experience and an outstanding track record to the company; and in a very short time she has become a key member of our team. When building a global company, you need to bring world class people on board, and kHyal is definitely world class. I am sure she will lead our marketing, communications and public relations strategies beyond our expectations,” Hernandez said. Cliff Wildes, IMPESA’s Chief Strategy Officer, noted, “I have worked with kHyal for over 25 years. First, at Microtech International, Inc. where I was CEO and founder, and she spearheaded marketing initiatives as Creative Director, and later, when we became cofounders and partners at SunStar Interactive. I have never met a more creative and talented individual. Her role as Chief Marketing Officer is essential to the growth and success of the company.” Digitally Driven. kHyal’s experience in digital spans three decades. A pioneering internet professional and award-winning creative, she was a founding member of the Women’s Internet History project and recruited member of the MIT Enterprise Forum of New York City, Inc.’s Marketing Committee. Strategically Poised. Prior to joining IMPESA, kHyal was President at fiZz Agency, and has held the positions of Chief Creative Officer at Metropolitan interactive; Creative Director at Havas Worldwide, NetKey and Microtech International; Vice President of Marketing at blowtorch studios and SunStar interactive; and Controller at Cello, Ltd. Her client roster spans a wide range of brands and corporations including: Pitney Bowes, Sharp Electronics, Xerox, Lexmark, Konica Minolta, ProLabs, MTV, Showtime Networks, GAP, BMW, UPS, Diageo, Datto, Centerplate, LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE, Deutsche Bank, Black&Decker, UBS Investment Bank, Whitney Museum of American Art and Carnegie Mellon University. With extensive experience working with national and international brands, corporations and agencies in the US, UK, Canada, Argentina, Germany and Costa Rica, kHyal’s background traverses technology, healthcare, education/digital publishing, finance, non-profit and consumer product verticals with an emphasis on software and hardware development. Active in industry associations, kHyal has co-chaired the Fundraising Committee of Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, Los Angeles; and was a member of the Connecticut Technology Council’s Vice President of Marketing Forum. She has been a juror for the London Interactive Advertising Awards; a judge for Hasbro’s Project Upcycle Design Awards; served as Communications Chair for the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) Brand Central Chapter, and was on the advisory board of GraphicDesign.com. kHyal majored in Mass Communications at Emerson College in addition to studies at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Art Institute of Boston; Boston Film and Video Foundation; Loyola Law School; Kodak’s Center for Creative Imaging and FIT. Passionate about education, kHyal is an Adjunct Instructor at Miami Ad School New York where she teaches Product Creation and Innovation; and was Adjunct Professor at Anhui Polytechnic University in Wuhu City, China through the Shintaro Akatsu School of Design at University of Bridgeport where she taught Design Thinking and Methodologies. She has been an invited senior portfolio reviewer at RISD, SVA, FIT, The One Club, ADC Global, Graduate Fashion Week London, Miami Ad School, The Portfolio Center, CADC, AIGA Rhode Island, AIGA Philadelphia, AIGA Connecticut, Pratt Institute, Parsons The New School for Design, Creative Circus, Hartford Art School at University of Hartford, Advertising Women of New York (AWNY), Moore College of Art and Design, Carnegie Mellon University, Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Cleveland Institute of Art, Tyler School of Art at Temple University, Kutztown University and Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). kHyal regularly speaks and facilitates workshops on branding, digital media, design, marketing, social media and business practices. Her engagements include: FleetBoston Financial’s Women Entrepreneurs’ Connection, Advertising Women of New York (AWNY) Annual Career Conference, Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), Sacred Heart University, Connecticut Art Directors Club (CADC) Student Conference, The Creative Circus–Atlanta, School of Visual Arts (SVA)–New York, The Grove–New Haven, HOW Design Live–Boston Creative Freelancers Conference, Hygienic Academy, Wakefield Boys and Girls Club, AIGA Rhode Island, The Amistad Center for Art & Culture at The Wadsworth Atheneum, AIGA Upstate New York Student Conference and Syracuse University. She was a media partner for the international design conference “A Better World by Design” at Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University; for the inaugural Leaders in Software and Art (LiSA) conference at the Guggenheim Museum in New York; and designed, planned and facilitated a fundraising event for New York Creative Tech Week 2016. A forerunner in the use of technology in her art and design practice in the early eighties, kHyal’s work has been exhibited in the American Visionary Art Museum, Ricco/Maresca Gallery—New York, Pavilion der Volksbühne–Berlin, New Britain Museum of American Art, la Gaîté Lyrique–Paris, Housatonic Art Museum, City Museum–Washington–DC, Intuit–Chicago, EGGO Arte–Buenos Aires, Cooper Union–New York, Art Basel–Switzerland, Art Basel—Miami and galleries worldwide. She is a contributing writer to numerous industry publications on art, design and technology. Founded in Costa Rica in 2013, IMPESA is an innovator of electronic payment solutions, licensed with VISA®and MasterCard®, and compliant with all government banking and card issuer regulations. The company has developed technologies such as card integration with satellite positioning systems (GPS) for large local and multinational distribution companies that use the software to manage their fleets. These technologies are included in IMPESA’s revolutionary flagship SaaS platform, Monibyte. Developed completely in-house by a dedicated team of engineers and programmers, the software has processed millions of transactions with major international corporate clients since launching in 2014, and will expand into US markets in Q4 2016. For banks, Monibyte is an unprecedented addition to their commercial credit card portfolios, and mitigates credit card fraud, potentially saving millions. For companies that are corporate customers of banks that offer Monibyte, it is an invaluable tool that allows 100% control of how every credit or debit card within the organization can be used. From sums of money, to type of currency, days of the week, time of day, geographic location and specific merchant; parameters can be changed instantly from the easy-to-use, web-based interface or smart phone app, without having to contact the bank. Monibyte integrates with most major ERPs, saving time and money on accounting tasks. IMPESA’s Founder, Chairman and CEO, Mario Hernández, is a known expert in the field of electronic payment innovation. He was honored with International Banker’s Best Innovation in Retail and Commercial Banking award in 2015, interviewed at The London Stock Exchange, and a featured speaker and panelist at the Mobile Payments Latin America Summit in 2016. IMPESA has offices in San José, Costa Rica and Orlando, Florida. For more information, visit impesa.net


News Article | March 4, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Tomoya Mori is a senior at Brown University pursuing interdisciplinary studies in space exploration, multimedia and education. He is a co-founder at Metaplaneta, a creative think tank that investigates a multidisciplinary approach to space. He contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. "Been there, done that." President Barack Obama famously used that line to help shift the world's attention from the moon to Mars as a space destination in recent years, though the debate on where to go next continues. But whether humanity wants to colonize the moon or terraform Mars, establishing a settlement on other celestial bodies is a challenge of immense scale. So a more important question to ask is this: What does it take to establish a permanent human presence outside of Earth? This question presents a great diversity of challenges that transcend disciplines. It goes beyond the realm of science and engineering, the two fields often considered the core of space exploration, and include politics, law, architecture, business and design. Extending a human presence beyond the planet will depend on diversifying the space community to include broader interests and perspectives. Already, a number of institutions collectively foster a multidisciplinary environment within the space industry. The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) in the University of Houston offers the world's only master of science program in space architecture. Other institutions educate students about space law and policy, including the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs in Washington, D.C., and Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy in Houston. These unique programs equip their students with specialized knowledge and skills for the field of space travel. The real value, however, is in bringing new perspectives to the ever-growing space industry. [Moon Base Visions: How to Build a Lunar Colony (Photos )] Currently, most of those disciplines are functionally independent. Rarely do politicians talk about the architecture of space vehicles, or scientists talk about the potential of space business. But in reality, those fields are so intertwined that interdisciplinary fusion can be a real game-changer. The space industry should focus not merely on diversification, but also on the process by which diverse disciplines interact. It is time to take a more transparent, integrative and interdisciplinary approach to space exploration. One method for integrating disciplines, called the integrated design approach (IDA), has proven effective in sustainable design and could provide the same benefits for space. Traditionally, designers have used a linear process to construct sustainable buildings. Architects make sketches and pass them on to the engineers, who evaluate the designs and then assign subcontractors, and so on. However, with that approach, time and money are already running out by the time conflicts and problems arise. IDA is successful because it involves all project members from the beginning, allowing them to identify and resolve potential conflicts earlier in the process. And the multidisciplinary environment forces project members to think outside their immediate areas of expertise, inspiring innovative solutions to problems and generally producing more energy-efficient and cost-effective results. For example, in the book "Integrative Design Guide to Green Building" (John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2009), the authors present real-life situations in which IDA led to a surprisingly efficient outcome. The book was written by 7group, a multidisciplinary team dedicated to sustainability and regeneration, and Bill Reed, a proponent and practitioner of sustainability and regeneration. In the example, a team of architects, landscape designers and engineers was determining the placement of an HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) system in an office building, and the architect asked the mechanical engineer to provide an answer. The engineer was stunned, at first. Even though he had more than 20 years of experience designing HVAC systems, never in his life had anyone asked him where to locate one. After a few minutes, he provided a solution that turned out to be extremely efficient and cost-effective. Instead of placing the necessary mechanical room on the roof, which the architects had done in the last project, the engineer proposed placing heat-pump units on the ground floor of the building. Not only did this solution reduce the piping work and save $40,000 in construction costs, it also led to simplified maintenance and significant operational savings. From that experience, the team realized the importance of questioning assumptions. All components of a building are interdependent, and therefore everyone's input should be respected — not only individuals within one's own area of expertise, but also everyone else in a team. Innovative solutions or strategies often come from unexpected sources, and in this example, the multidisciplinary environment was critical to promoting openness and stimulating everyone's creativity.  The work of Danish architects in the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) provides another illustration. In 2009, the Urban Planning Department of Tallinn, Estonia, and the Union of Estonian Architects held an international competition for a new town hall in in Tallinn. Throughout the design process, the BIG architects received input from the jury about the citizens’ needs and take into account of the city’s governance system. The design had to be flexible and accommodate unexpected demands.  The BIG group's solution was simple yet quite novel; it was to increase the transparency between the citizens and politicians, to improve governance and the town's participatory democracy.  The BIG town hall design has myriad glass windows and an open structure, offering the politicians daylight and a view of the city marketplace, and offering the town's citizens a chance to see their elected officials at work.  Although the mayor of Tallinn had expressed his hope to build a new city hall, the proposal still remains a mere design, albeit one that shows the effectiveness of integrated design. Here, the architects not only provided a great working space for politicians, but also unified the city as a whole.  Space habitation is not just space travel Space infrastructures are, in essence, organic systems. They need to be more self-sustaining than any regenerative and sustainable green buildings on Earth. And because of the constrained living conditions they present, such buildings must include input from the astronauts and travelers who might use them, and the input from a range of designers, engineers and others. For example, the habitation modules of the International Space Station must address energy and thermal balance, waste management, mechanical structure, and architecture, in addition to comfort and privacy, among other factors.  The Habitation Design Center in NASA's Johnson Space Center often invites astronauts as consultants to improve module designs and make them more human-centered. It may seem obvious, but it is crucial that space vehicles be designed with feedback from astronauts, instead of becoming function-based machines like fighter planes. Rarely does one see inhabitants involved in the design process of an Earth-bound structure.   For missions, like space colonization, of a larger scale, the IDA approach is even more necessary. Settling on a celestial body is far different from simply going there. To establish a sustainable living space in such a hostile environment, one needs to not only think about science and engineering, but also consider psychological, architectural, societal, political and economic aspects. Today, many of the world's space agencies have expressed interest in sending humans to the moon. Johann-Dietrich Woerner, the director general of the European Space Agency (ESA), has been pushing his vision to establish a moon village. Although the agency has yet to officially approve that plan, his message has gone global.  Despite the hint of novelty it carries, the concept of lunar colonization existed long before the Apollo era. Numerous books and papers have presented promising plans for a lunar colony, but none have been realized, or even attempted. One of the fundamental obstacles is financial. Even if the moon village concept succeeded, most taxpayers would not understand why it was worth the cost.  And yet, the moon has the potential to help humanity grow as a species. A lunar colony could be a model for a sustainable ecosystem, a testing ground to strengthen international collaboration, a giant laboratory for cutting-edge scientific experiments and technological innovation, a platform for new businesses, a stepping-stone for further exploration of the solar system, and a mental exercise for challenging norms. But if humanity is to establish a lunar colony, the world must employ IDA, involving all key players at the start.  Over the weekend of Feb. 19 to 21, Brown University in Rhode Island will host Space Horizons 2016, a student-focused, three-day integrative workshop that brings students and professionals from all disciplines to conceptualize an international lunar city.  The event will consist of four workshops — Politics, Infrastructure, Science, and Business & Technology — that will ask several questions: What would politically motivate participating countries? What is the economic value of a lunar city, and what commercial opportunities can sustain the lunar economy? What new experiments would emerge on a lunar base, and how would they help humanity live on the moon and beyond? What infrastructure is required to sustain a lunar ecosystem?  Through the integrated-design approach, participants will be encouraged to think beyond their immediate expertise, and to recognize the connections between their skills and the space industry, making space more tangible to everybody. Each workshop will have experienced mentors and professionals, including representatives from NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Lunar and Planetary Institute, PoliSpace, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture, Masten Space Systems, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Brown University, Yale University in New Jersey, the University of Central Florida and the Rhode Island School of Design. Ultimately, the findings may lead to a joint project or publication.  But Space Horizons 2016 is not the first to take on the moon village concept. At the end of last year, ESA European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) hosted "The Moon Village Workshop", which took place in conjunction with International Symposium on Moon 2020-2030. The workshop invited professionals and students from all over the world to discuss and propose ideas to consolidate visions for the moon village concept. The participants were split into three groups: Moon Habitat Design, Science and Technology Potential in the Moon Village, and Engaging Stakeholders. The three working groups came up with several recommended actions to be taken by the director general of ESA, including the design and operations of a moon-base simulation at the European Astronaut Centre and the engagement of the most direct stakeholders, such as media, national governments and citizens, at the next ESA Ministerial Council Meeting.  It takes time for educational strategies to prove their effectiveness. And as long as the moon village concept remains a vision, it will be challenging to involve people from nonspace industries, especially in an era in which the space industry is generally considered exclusive to rocket scientists.  However, the future of space exploration is in widening the community. Most innovative ideas are the products of interdisciplinary fusions. Just as much as technological advancements will accelerate space exploration, broader interests and perspectives will also catalyze the process of establishing space colonies. The integrated-design approach has the potential to not only open up new perspectives, but also offer a younger generation an opportunity to design the future of space exploration and radically change humanity's perception of space. It is those people who will advance society into the universe. Follow all of the Expert Voices issues and debates — and become part of the discussion — on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. This version of the article was originally published on Space.com. Copyright 2016 SPACE.com, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

MyHome, the Manhattan-based renovation company, recently completed a total apartment renovation at 225 East 36th Street in Manhattan. The project was designed by Senior MyHome Remodeling Consultant, Ben Pitt. The homeowners desired an open concept kitchen with a clean look. This look was achieved with stock lacquer frameless cabinets with built-ins pulls from Hanssem Cabinets. To bring light into the space, the kitchen was outfitted with Xenon under-cabinet lights and recessed lights in the soffit above breakfast bar. To complete the look, the homeowners opted for Caesarstone counters and glass mosaic backsplash from The Tile Store. New stainless appliances and a stylish KWC faucet added visual highlights to the design. For the guest bathroom, warm solid-body porcelain tiles and a cinnamon-stained vanity from Ronbow brought color and brightness to the design. The bathroom included a cast-iron Kohler tub and frameless sliding glass enclosure from Dreamline. Riobel shower fixture and faucet and American Standard accessories finish off the look. To create a unique look in the master bath, the design used an alternating, staggered ceramic white tile from Porcelanosa. This tile adds a more interesting dimensions than simple subway tiles. The look was topped off with silver grout to highlight the pattern. Daltile glass mosaic flooring and accent wall brings a focus element into the space. The client opted for a Robern medicine cabinet with integrated lights to go over a simple pedestal sink with hand-towel bar. Fixtures, like in guest bathroom, are from Riobel and the shower glass is a custom frameless enclosure with swing-out door. MyHome was founded in 2001 by managing partner Yoel Piotraut. The company, which is based in New York City, has a team of consultants, designers and managers. MyHome’s New York City kitchen and bath showroom is located at 353 West 48th Street in Manhattan. Ben Pitt has been working with MyHome since 2003. He previously worked as an industrial designer, designing kitchen products for companies such as KitchenAid and Cuisinart after graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design. MyHome offers free in-home design consultations for Manhattan homeowners. This is an opportunity for homeowners to collaborate with a talented team within the comfort of their home. Find out why MyHome is the trusted leader in NYC design and renovations. Book a consultation at http://www.myhomeus.com.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

Seema Goel will be speaking at the upcoming University Art Association of Canada Conference this week at UQAM in Montreal. Her talk Data Dexterities is part of the session “Making Knowledge: Craft and the Digital” on Friday October 28th. In Data Dexterities she explores her own art/craft practise highlighting the use of digital technologies as a material to enhance touch, and play, and where the viewer’s awareness of the digital experience is integral to the success of the work. Data Dexterities: The project of shifting the digital experience beyond the binary is well underway. From simple yes/no response, Seema strives now to mimic the multiplicity available in human interaction. How does she, in craft, participate in this shift to engage the nuance and complexity of touch, materiality, and maker-user connection? How is craft language equally explored and accentuated through this effort? This presentation explores the contradictions and connections between touch and craft & digital interfaces through her own craft-based art practise. Bio: Seema Goel is a Canadian artist, writer, and curator. Her current work explores the manipulations and representations of the natural world resulting from human intervention. Using a wide range of media including taxidermy, projection, natural materials, and responsive technologies, she invites the viewer to engage these subjects through humour, touch, and participation. She has exhibited in North America and Europe and her writing has appeared in numerous literary publications, newspaper journals, and on radio and stage. Goel holds an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, an Associated Arts Diploma from the Ontario College of Art and Design, and a BSc. from McGill. She is also an alumna of the Harvard Summer Writing program, the Banff Centre Writing program, St. Peter’s Abbey, Fort San, and also managed to moonlight in the Brown Creative Writing program while a student at RISD. She is currently the STEAM coordinator and artist-in-residence in the faculty of Science at the University of Manitoba. For more information, please visit http://seemagoel.com/


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

We’ve heard a lot about STEM toys, which are so hot right now. Their focus is on teaching kids science, technology, engineering, and math so they can eventually become very rich and take care of us when we are old and frail. Just kidding! (Mostly!) FollowGrams is a smart projector currently available to back Kickstarter for $75, self-described as “an app-connected STEM toy that teaches kids how to draw pictures, letters and numbers in a fun hands-on experience.” It’s basically one step above a light box, which lets you trace over artwork, or that Magic Tracer toy that aired on TV infomercials in the ‘90s. (I wanted it so badly but my mom was wary of giving her credit card information over the phone, so that was an unfulfilled dream. Reading the Amazon reviews for it now though, a customer reported that the shoddy toy broke her grandson’s heart and “brought him to tears,” so maybe it wasn’t all that well-made.) The FollowGrams app can also apply filters to photos kids take, and project it onto paper which they can then draw over. It uses Bluetooth to connect to Android, iPhone, and Amazon devices. This is all good and fine, but my big question is, why market a kids’ art projector as a STEM toy? Yes, STEM is a trendy buzzword you can throw in your promotional copy and it’s important, especially for young girls, to feel encouraged to pursue science and math careers — but why try to market a product as something it’s not? Why are we so afraid to let our kids become artists? Despite the fact that I, a comic artist when I am not working at The Verge dot com, am constantly writhing on the ground lamenting “Why didn’t I just become an engineer” every night before a deadline, I still think being an artist is a worthwhile career option that kids should have the opportunity to explore! All this led me to a new discovery, called STEAM. The Rhode Island School of Design has an initiative called STEM to STEAM in which they champion adding art and design to STEM research. I’m into it, but sounds like a lot of pressure for kids to be impossibly well-balanced! Still, emphasis on hitting as many educational disciplines as possible seems less limiting than focusing on just some that we think are better than others.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: phys.org

Staff members and students at the Rhode Island School of Design have come up with a new, adjustable suit that closely resembles an actual space suit. Real space suits are designed to work in zero gravity, meaning they're too expensive and too heavy to use at the NASA-funded Mars simulation mission in Hawaii. The simulated space suits that are used instead wear out quickly and aren't all that comfortable. They're small and provide poor ventilation. The new suit, unveiled Monday in Providence, is expected to be tested during the next Mars simulation mission in 2017 in Hawaii. A yearlong Mars simulation mission ended in August. It was the fourth HI-SEAS, or Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation. NASA funded the study, run through the University of Hawaii. Andrzej Stewart was the chief engineering officer on that mission. At 6 feet 2, Stewart couldn't zip up the simulated suits, so he wore a hazmat suit instead, which he said was easy to wear but not very realistic. The entire crew saw a need for a better suit, said Sheyna Gifford, the mission's space doctor. A realistic suit is important, so crew members can see what experiments they can do and what tools they can use while wearing it, and how the habitat should be designed to accommodate it, she said. "What we're aiming for is the best possible simulation, to inform NASA about what we learned on that simulation so they can succeed in the real thing," she said. At RISD (often spoken as "RIZ'-dee") on Monday, Stewart donned the new suit to see how it fit, how he moved in it and how well the ventilation and radio communications worked. Gifford was an observer, along with a NASA spacesuit engineer who will provide feedback to ensure that the design best resembles the architecture of suits NASA may use for future exploration missions. It was the suit's first rigorous test. Stewart said that the ventilation kept him cool and that the suit restricted his movement like a real suit would. "It's great to finally be able to put on a full suit and be able to walk around, be able to move in it," Stewart said. "It makes me feel a lot more like an astronaut." The white suit is made of heavy-duty nylon fabric; carbon fiber that forms a hard shell for the upper torso area; and foam that replicates the pressurization of an actual suit. It comes in 16 pieces; components can be replaced or resized easily to fit the short and the tall. It weighs about 50 pounds. Work began after Gifford told Michael Lye, the adjunct faculty member who coordinates projects between the school and NASA, about the opportunity to make a more realistic suit. Gifford said the new suit is great, especially its modularity, because it will fit whomever is on the crew, though the exterior ventilation tubes will have to go inside the suit so they don't get caught on something or crushed. The suit, the only one RISD made, will be shipped to HI-SEAS, Lye said. The materials for the suit cost about $10,000, paid for with grants from the HI-SEAS program and the Rhode Island Space Grant Consortium, Lye said. Students in the industrial design and apparel design programs worked on it. RISD is one of the country's top art and design schools and has a large industrial design department. It has worked with NASA before, including on a project to design space gloves. In this Monday, Dec. 5, 2016 photo, Andrzej Stewart, the chief engineering officer on a year-long Mars simulation mission that ended in August, walks through a machine shop at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), while wearing a new space suit that the school created in Providence, R.I. RISD staff and students have come up with the new suit that closely resembles an actual space suit. Real space suits are designed to work in zero gravity. They're too expensive and too heavy to use at the NASA-funded Mars simulation mission in Hawaii. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) In this Monday, Dec. 5, 2016 photo, Andrzej Stewart, the chief engineering officer on a year-long Mars simulation mission that ended in August, is assisted by Michael Lye, left, a Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) faculty member who coordinates projects between RISD and NASA, as Stewart wears a new space suit the school designed in Providence, R.I. RISD created the new space suit for scientists to wear on the next Mars simulation mission in 2017 in Hawaii. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) In this Monday, Dec. 5, 2016 photo, a portion of a space suit the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) designed rests on the floor of a room at the school in Providence, R.I. RISD staff and students have come up with the new suit that closely resembles an actual space suit. Real space suits are designed to work in zero gravity. They're too expensive and too heavy to use at the NASA-funded Mars simulation mission in Hawaii. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Husson University announced today that it would be featuring a multimedia art and science gallery installation by Krisanne Baker at the Robert E. White Gallery in Peabody Hall on its Bangor, Maine campus. The opening reception for the exhibition will take place on Thursday, February 9, 2017 from 4 – 5:30 p.m. and will begin with an artist talk by Baker. Prior to the opening, Baker will be spending time in classes where she will share her insights with Husson students as a visiting artist. The gallery installation will be on display until March 31, 2017. “The concept of entropy, or the spiraling process of things falling apart, and the way our culture continues to layer refuse conversely inspires my work toward sustainability in our environment and culture,” said Baker. “By engaging the viewer in an internal dialogue on the results of unsustainable cultural practices, my work explores a theme of regeneration; or how we might reverse entropic situations into those that emphasize renewal or sustainable growth. I like to call this new term ‘regenerentropic.’ The meaning of my multi-media work is not embodied solely by the objects, but by the idea that we need to improve and care for our ecologies. In addition, I want to begin a dialogue and inspire action between the work and the viewing public.” Baker grew up on Cape Cod sailing the waters of New England with her father. Her love for the ocean and our connection to it as the basis of life is evident in the digital video ‘Upstream to Downstream (In Our Bloodstreams).’ She received training as a painter at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1982. This was where she first encountered video production. Baker’s graduate work at the Vermont College of Fine Arts combined her love for the natural environment with her art. Today, she is an ecological art activist. Her multi-media sculptures, drawings, and digital media works are specifically concerned with the sustainability of water quality, availability, and the rights of all creatures on this water planet. Baker has lived and worked on the coast of Maine for over 20 years. “We are honored to have an artist of Krisanne Baker’s caliber exhibiting at the Robert E. White Gallery,” said Kathi J. Smith, an assistant professor at Husson University’s College of Science and Humanities and gallery coordinator. “Her work reminds us of both the power and beauty contained in the natural world, along with our responsibilities as custodians of this planet to protect and ensure the ongoing sustainability of the environment. We aim to introduce students to the places where science and art meet, and to develop conversation across curriculums.” Additional work by Baker can be seen at krisannebaker.com. Artists with connections to Maine who work in every possible medium including watercolors, still lifes, oil paintings, pastels, sculptures, acrylics, photographs and printmaking, are featured at the Robert E. White Gallery. With a new show approximately every 10 weeks, the gallery provides students with a glimpse at how regional artists express themselves, giving them added insight into the place where they've chosen to go to school. The newly developed visiting artist program invites artists into the classroom to engage students in opportunities for experiential learning. The gallery was established in 1992 and named for, and endowed by, Husson alumnus and former Board of Trustee Chair Robert E. White '65. The Robert E. White Gallery is free and open to the public, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or by appointment. It is located in Peabody Hall on the campus of Husson University at 1 College Circle, Bangor, ME. For additional information contact: 207-941-7004 or email RobertEWhiteGallery(AT)husson(DOT)edu. For more than 100 years, Husson University has prepared future leaders to handle the challenges of tomorrow through innovative undergraduate and graduate degrees. With a commitment to delivering affordable classroom, online and experiential learning opportunities, Husson University has come to represent superior value in higher education. Our Bangor campus and off-campus satellite education centers in Southern Maine, Wells, and Northern Maine provide advanced knowledge in business; health and education; pharmacy studies; science and humanities; as well as communication. In addition, Husson University has a robust adult learning program. For more information about educational opportunities that can lead to personal and professional success, visit Husson.edu.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 244.24K | Year: 2015

Simulated virtual prototypes have removed much trial-and-error from the design process in many fields. But to be useful as a virtual prototype, a simulation must reliably predict the relevant characteristics of the thing being designed: strength for a bridge; lift for an aircraft, or appearance for a fabric. Previous advances in rendering have led to a current explosion in the use of rendered images to prototype the appearance of objects, and even to represent them to customers, but only where the materials involved can be represented well. Textiles are currently difficult to represent, due to their intricate construction and subtle reflectance, and because their appearance is inextricably linked to their shape and motion. Although fairly suitable for movies, the state of the art in simulating cloth appearance and deformation is not predictive of real appearance and therefore not usable in a design process, in which realistic but inaccurate results are useless. This project, which represents a collaborative effort between computer scientists at Cornell University and textile designers at the Rhode Island School of Design, aims to create the predictive simulation tools needed to enable virtual prototyping to revolutionize the textile and garment industries in the same way it has already revolutionized so many fields of manufacturing. New models and algorithms created by the Cornell team will be integrated into the Loomit tool for fabric design, which will then be used by the RISD team to produce new textiles that will in turn be shipped back to Cornell where changes in the RISD design process resulting from Loomits enhanced capabilities will be studied. At RISD this involvement will engage many student artists and designers, helping them develop the skills to work with increasingly technological media in their future careers, while at Cornell the project will afford computer science students experience understanding and solving problems faced by artists and designers.

Textiles remain a challenge for appearance simulation because of many unsolved fundamental problems. The state-of-the-art models for realistic cloth rendering and simulation were developed for entertainment applications and do not accurately predict the behavior of real textiles. In this project, the PI team will compare appearance and deformation models to measurements of textiles from CT, imaging, and other modalities, then improve them as needed so that they are capable of fitting real materials. Current methods cannot capture the properties of an existing fabric well enough to predict its appearance under close visual inspection. The PI team will develop new methods for jointly capturing the appearance and mechanical properties of textiles, combining measurement and model tuning to produce predictive working models of textiles and the garments and furnishings made from them. Detailed cloth simulations and renderings are currently impractical for moderately complex objects, such as complete garments. Scalability fundamentally requires multi-scale models that simulate details only when they are actually needed. The PI team will create multi-scale models that enable interactive, predictive visualization during the design process. Since the targeted applications all require accurate prediction, a major focus of the research is on validation, testing both the accuracy of the individual technical pieces and the ultimate usefulness of the new techniques in actual use.


News Article | November 13, 2016
Site: www.wired.com

None of the four black American students who sat at the whites-only counter at Woolworth’s in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1960 were designers. They were protestors, part of a growing movement to bring civil rights to all Americans. By sitting there, unserved for hours, enduring jeers and threats, they planned to change how restaurants treated black people. It was a milestone in civil disobedience, but also, as the critic Ralph Caplan has said, one of the greatest examples of design in the 20th century. “Obviously it wasn’t about the visual characteristics of it; it went well beyond that,” says Sol Sender, who designed the logo for Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. Thoughtful design, whether it’s a logo, an object, or a well-organized protest, has always had the ability to effect political change. And yet, in days following the election, the power of design felt—at least momentarily— diminished. Graphic design didn’t affect the outcome. Neither did data visualization. Algorithms and experience design didn’t combat the internet echo chamber, they strengthened it. Honest designers have never sold their work as a panacea, but like so many people, they are pondering the role they play going forward. “The outcome of this election has forced me to reconsider who I am working for, how I am working with them, and how it will impact the world,” says Joe Marianek, co-founder of the studio Small Stuff. It might not sound like it, but Marianek’s view is ultimately hopeful. Designers tend to be optimistic. “They see design at the heart of creation and change,” says Rosanne Somerson, president of the Rhode Island School of Design. And the election has acted as a catalyst for many designers to reevaluate how their work can bolster social progress. In a call to action on Design Observer, Michael Bierut and Jessica Helfand wrote: “Designers understand this implicitly: we may not be in a position to control change, but we are its most ardent and expressive ambassadors.” It’s a cheerfully realistic assessment of design’s limitations, but while designers may not wield the power of politicians, they can still lead the way. At its broadest definition, design has always been about problem solving. Effective design helps people navigate complex situations, it brings clarity to confusion, it resolves misunderstanding through empathy. “We have the power to create images, stories, and experiences that can give the public and policymakers better ways of understanding the facts and moving collective action towards a preferable future,” says Matt Cottam, co-founder of interaction design studio Tellart. It’s idealistic—sometimes overly so, as designer Jennifer Daniel recently wrote—but design always has been about shaping the future with pragmatic hopefulness. On a practical level, this means designers are translators, making complex data, policy, and even emotions easily understood. “We can use the tools of visual design and its capacity to abstract, open possibilities, inspire, dissect, associate, to reconnect numbers to what they actually stand for: a messy and intricate reality that is really really hard to pin down and to grasp,” says Giorgia Lupi, an information designer and co-founder of Accurat. Visual design also can provide agency. “I think design can express ideas in an exciting way to motivate people,” says Jesse Reed, a Pentagram designer who worked on Hillary Clinton’s logo. “If you’re talking about the future of this country and what graphic design can do to somehow help the situation, I think it’s continuing to express impactful ideas and enable other people to take action in whatever way they feel is best.” Still, it remains far too soon to know how design’s influence will manifest. For now, it’s enough to know that designers are thinking deeply about their role going forward. At the very least, a generation of designers is honing its craft under more divisive, but also more honest, circumstances. That’s a good thing. The election has highlighted an Achilles’ heel of design—that despite the rhetoric around human-centered design, designers too often account for only a portion of the population. Their biggest challenge now is to find an effective way of communicating with those who hold views contrary to their own. In that way, designers are no different than the rest of us. “We all have different ways of contributing to this effort, and ours is through intention, a.k.a. design,” Reed says. Design, at its best, promotes understanding. That’s something the country needs a lot more of right now.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Students and staff members at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) have teamed up with NASA to build a new space suit design that can easily be adjusted to fit the bodies of future Mars explorers. With NASA planning to send people to the Red Planet in the next few decades, researchers now have to come up with better gear to handle the environment of deep space. However, designing new space suits that would work in zero gravity can be a challenge. Those used for Mars simulation missions in Hawaii are smaller than typical zero gravity suits and have poor ventilation, making them quite an uncomfortable thing to wear for astronauts. The materials used for the simulated space suits also wear out easily. To solve this problem, NASA collaborated with the RISD to develop a new and better space suit specially designed for the Red Planet mission. Both parties unveiled the breakthrough Mars suit on Monday, Dec. 5, and are now getting ready to have it tested during the next mission tests in Hawaii in 2017. Aside from making the new space suit more durable during testing, the designers also had to make sure that it fits the bodies of wearers properly without sacrificing mobility. Andrzej Stewart, one of the engineers involved in NASA's Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) program, said he had to wear a hazmat suit during the tests because he was too tall for the simulation suit he was given. While this may have worked during the simulations in Hawaii, it wouldn't be realistic as astronauts cannot wear hazmat suits in space. Sheyna Gifford, the space doctor for the Mars simulation mission, pointed out that crew members need to have realistic space suits to find out what experiments they can do and what specific tools they can use while wearing them. She said that the suits will also play an important role in determining the appropriate design for the crew members' habitats. "What we're aiming for is the best possible simulation, to inform NASA about what we learned on that simulation so they can succeed in the real thing," Gifford explained. During Monday's presentation, Stewart wore the new suit made by the RISD designers to find out how it will fit him and how he'll be able to move while wearing it. Not only did the suit fit Stewart's 6-foot and 2-inch frame, but it also allowed him to move around without restricting motion. He said that its ventilation also helped keep him cool throughout the test. According to the designers, the new suit was made from heavy-duty nylon fabric as well as carbon fiber that has a hard shell for its upper torso portion. It also has a type of foam that recreates the pressurization often seen in actual space suits. The RISD suit comes in 16 different pieces, with each one easily replaced or resized in order to fit any body size. It also weighs only about 50 pounds. Michael Lye, one of the RISD faculty members working on the project, said that the new space suit costs about $10,000 to make. The one that Stewart wore on Monday will now be shipped to Hawaii for next year's HI-SEAS testing. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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