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News Article | January 6, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

When she was five-years-old, Cardiff resident Rhian Lewis was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, a disease that causes retinal degeneration as photoreceptor cells die off. There is no cure, and eventually Lewis was completely blind in her right eye and had no vision in her left eye. But surgeons from the Oxford Eye Hospital at Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital have successfully installed a 3 x 3 mm, wafer-thin electronic chip in the back of Lewis’ right eye, giving the 49-year-old mother of two a chance to see again. The technology and Lewis’ story will air on BBC’s “Trust Me I’m A Doctor,” which is slated to air Wednesday, Jan. 6. The show also captures the moment when Lewis reads the time correctly, a task she hasn’t been able to do with her right eye for about 16 years. “Honest to God, that felt like Christmas Day,” Lewis said. The small chip was inserted into the back of Lewis’ right eye in a six-hr plus operation. Since Lewis still had an intact optic nerve and the necessary brain wiring for vision, the scientists just needed a device to substitute for the photoreceptors’ function. According to Oxford, the chip—developed by the German engineering firm Retina Implant AG—“captures the light entering the eye to stimulate the nerve cells of the inner retina to deliver signals to the brain through the optic nerve.” “The device is connected to a tiny computer that sits underneath the skin behind the ear,” the hospital continued. “This is powered by a magnetic coil which is applied to the skin—from the outside this looks similar to a hearing aid.” The device is then turned on following the completion of any healing required from the surgery. At first, the images appear as flashes of light, but eventually the brain begins to make sense of the flashes, converting them into shapes and objects. The image is akin to the black and white, grainy images of the first television pictures, according to the hospital. The chip is limited to 1,600 pixels. It’s a big step forward for Lewis, who hasn’t visually seen her children for around eight years, or glimpsed her own face. Lewis’ implant is part of ongoing research that is funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)’s Invention for innovation program, which has partnered with Retina Implant AG and NIHR’s Oxford Biomedical Research Centre. Eventually, Lewis walked around outside with the implant. She said, “I walked up the street, and the lady from social services said to me to point out anything I thought might or might not be there. And the first thing I thought ‘there might be something there,’ there was a car, a silver car, and I couldn't believe it, because the signal was really strong, and that was the sun shining on the silver car. And I was just, well, I was just so excited, I was quite teary!” Lewis is the first person in the U.K. to receive this “bionic eye.”


News Article | January 5, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

When she was five-years-old, Cardiff resident Rhian Lewis was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, a disease that causes retinal degeneration as photoreceptor cells die off. There is no cure, and eventually Lewis was completely blind in her right eye and had no vision in her left eye. But surgeons from the Oxford Eye Hospital at Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital have successfully installed a 3 x 3 mm, wafer-thin electronic chip in the back of Lewis’ right eye, giving the 49-year-old mother of two a chance to see again. The technology and Lewis’ story will air on BBC’s “Trust Me I’m A Doctor,” which is slated to air Wednesday, Jan. 6. The show also captures the moment when Lewis reads the time correctly, a task she hasn’t been able to do with her right eye for about 16 years. “Honest to God, that felt like Christmas Day,” Lewis said. The small chip was inserted into the back of Lewis’ right eye in a six-hr plus operation. Since Lewis still had an intact optic nerve and the necessary brain wiring for vision, the scientists just needed a device to substitute for the photoreceptors’ function. According to Oxford, the chip—developed by the German engineering firm Retina Implant AG—“captures the light entering the eye to stimulate the nerve cells of the inner retina to deliver signals to the brain through the optic nerve.” “The device is connected to a tiny computer that sits underneath the skin behind the ear,” the hospital continued. “This is powered by a magnetic coil which is applied to the skin—from the outside this looks similar to a hearing aid.” The device is then turned on following the completion of any healing required from the surgery. At first, the images appear as flashes of light, but eventually the brain begins to make sense of the flashes, converting them into shapes and objects. The image is akin to the black and white, grainy images of the first television pictures, according to the hospital. The chip is limited to 1,600 pixels. It’s a big step forward for Lewis, who hasn’t visually seen her children for around eight years, or glimpsed her own face. Lewis’ implant is part of ongoing research that is funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)’s Invention for innovation program, which has partnered with Retina Implant AG and NIHR’s Oxford Biomedical Research Centre. Eventually, Lewis walked around outside with the implant. She said, “I walked up the street, and the lady from social services said to me to point out anything I thought might or might not be there. And the first thing I thought ‘there might be something there,’ there was a car, a silver car, and I couldn't believe it, because the signal was really strong, and that was the sun shining on the silver car. And I was just, well, I was just so excited, I was quite teary!” Lewis is the first person in the U.K. to receive this “bionic eye.”


— Market Scenario: Bionic Eye is device which allows blind people to see again. Basically the bionic eye is a computer chip that is placed in the back of the eye. This chip is connected to a small scale camera which sits in a glass that the patient wares. The images caught by the camera are sent by the chip, which are deciphered into driving forces which the brain can translate. This technology is expected to be the most effective to those with macular degeneration. “Ask for your specific company profile and country level customization on reports.” Key Players • Second Sight (US) • Retina Implant AG (Germany) • Pixium Vision (France) • The Bionic Eye (UK) • iBionics (Canada) Study Objectives of Bionic Eye Market: • To provide detailed analysis of the market structure along with forecast for the next 10 years of the various segments and sub-segments of the Bionic Eye market • To provide insights about factors affecting the market growth To analyze the Bionic Eye market based on various factors- price analysis, supply chain analysis, porters five force analysis etc. • To provide historical and forecast revenue of the market segments and sub-segments with respect to four main geographies and their countries- Americas, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Middle East & Africa. • To provide country level analysis of the market with respect to the current market size and future prospective • To provide country level analysis of the market for segments by type, by technology, by end users and its sub-segments. • To provide overview of key players and their strategic profiling in the market, comprehensively analyzing their core competencies, and drawing a competitive landscape for the market • To track and analyze competitive developments such as joint ventures, strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions, new product developments, and research and developments in the global Bionic Eye market. Taste the market data and market information presented through more than 70 market data tables and figures spread in 110 numbers of pages of the project report. Avail the in-depth table of content TOC & market synopsis on “Global Bionic Eye Research Report- Forecast To 2027” Regional Analysis of Bionic Eye Market: Globally North America is the largest market for Bionic Eye. The North American market for Bionic Eye is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX% and is expected to reach at US$ XXX Million by the end of the forecasted period. This is due to growing demand of healthcare technologies .Europe is the second-largest market for Bionic Eye which is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX%. Whereas Asia pacific is expected to be a growing for Bionic Eye Market Table of Content 1. Report Prologue 2. Introduction 2.1 Definition 2.2 Scope of the Study 2.2.1 Research Objective 2.2.2 Assumptions 2.2.3 Limitations 2.3 Market Structure 2.4. Market Segmentation 3. Research Methodology 3.1 Research Process 3.2 Primary Research 3.3 Secondary Research 3.4 Market Size Estimation 3.5 Forecast Model 4. Market Dynamics 4.1 Drivers 4.2 Restraints 4.3 Opportunities 4.4 Macroeconomic Indicators 5. Market Factor Analysis 5.1 Value Chain Analysis 5.2 Porters Five Forces Continue………. The report for Global Bionic Eye Market of Market Research Future comprises of extensive primary research along with the detailed analysis of qualitative as well as quantitative aspects by various industry experts, key opinion leaders to gain the deeper insight of the market and industry performance. The report gives the clear picture of current market scenario which includes historical and projected market size in terms of value and volume, technological advancement, macro economical and governing factors in the market. The report provides details information and strategies of the top key players in the industry. The report also gives a broad study of the different markets segments and regions Related Report The global multiple myeloma (plasma cell cancer), treatment & drug market during the forecast period 2016-2027, there by offering insights on key present growth indicators and forecast indicators such as drivers, restrains, opportunities and trends, that are involved in shaping the market. https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/articles/multiple-myeloma-plasma-cell-cancer-treatment-drug-global-market-analysis-size-market-data-trends-growth-forecast-to-2025 About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services. For more information, please visit https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/global-bionic-eye-research-report-forecast-to-2027


Stingl K.,University Hospital of Tuebingen | Greppmaier U.,Retina Implant | Wilhelm B.,STZ eyetrial | Zrenner E.,University Hospital of Tuebingen
Klinische Monatsblatter fur Augenheilkunde | Year: 2010

Visual implants are medical technologies that replace parts of the visual neuronal pathway. The subretinal implant developed by our group is being used in a human trials since 2005 and replaces the function of degenerated photoreceptors by an electronic device in blind patients. The subretinal implant consists of a 70-μm thin microchip with 1500 microphotodiodes each with an amplifier and an electrode with area of 3 mm × 3 mm. The power supply is provided by a subdermal power supply cable. The microchip is implanted under the macula and transforms the light signal into an electrical one, which is referred directly to the bipolar cells. Requirements for a good function of the implant are a preserved function of the inner retina, as well as clear optic media and a good visual acuity in the earlier life. The current technology can mediate a visual field of 10 - 12° and a computed resolution of up to 0.25° visual angle (corresponding to a visual acuity of 63/1000 - 80/1000) in blind patients. The so far best results from our studies reached a visual acuity of 21/1000 in blind retinitis pigmentosa patients. This overview is intended to inform the ophthalmologist about the current state of the technology and help him/her to advise interested patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG.


Patent
Retina Implant | Date: 2011-09-19

An active retinal implant (10) to be implanted into an eye has an array (16) of stimulation elements (17) that emit stimulation signals to cells of the retina, wherein the stimulation elements (17) are designed as radiation-emitting elements.


A device for contacting and/or electrically stimulating biological tissue by means of at least one electrode has at least a first unit, on which the at least one electrode is provided and which is configured for implantation in a human or animal body, a second unit, for supplying the first unit with electrical energy, and at least a first and a second conductive track for the voltage supply of the first unit. The first and second conductive tracks are respectively electrically connected to the first and second units and are at different voltage potentials. Spatially between the first and second conductive tracks, at least a first additional conductive track is arranged that is functionally not involved in the voltage supply of the first unit.


News Article | January 8, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

A new report from the research and consulting firm GlobalData predicts a promising future for the ocular medical device market. The report’s author, GlobalData’s medical device analyst Shashank Settipalli, writes that the successful implantation of the Alpha IMS device made by Retina Implant AG could kick start the growth of the “burgeoning retinal prosthesis market.” Scientists from the University of Oxford recently installed the implant in Rhian Lewis, a woman in the U.K. who suffered from retinitis pigmentosa, a rare disease that has no cure. Photoreceptor cells in the eye die at the onset of the disease. Lewis has no vision in her left eye and was rendered completely blind in her right eye. The wafer-thin electronic chip powered by a tiny battery housed behind the ear restored vision in Lewis’s right eye helping her to see again. The Alpha IMS device has distinct advantages over Second Sight’s Argus II system, its closest competitor in the retinitis pigmentosa space, says Settipalli. This rival product can help an individual suffering from this disease view light and shapes, but does not restore someone’s vision, reports the Los Angeles Times. The analyst highlights another difference between Second Sight’s and Retina AG’s devices writing that “Unlike the Argus II, the Alpha IMS device does not require an external camera or video processing unit. By leveraging these advantages and positive clinical results, Retina Implant AG has ample opportunities to expand its presence in the ocular devices space." Settipalli concludes his analysis describing how this market will continue to flourish: “Start-up and mid-size ophthalmic device companies could appeal to investors encouraged by recent developments, whereas the larger multinational firms may seek new growth strategies through acquisitions and strong research and development efforts.”


News Article | December 1, 2012
Site: mashable.com

It's the end of the week, a beginning of a new month, nearly the end of the year and maybe even the end of the world, if you believe some interpretations of the Mayan calendar. Rather than worrying about an apocalyptic future, however, why not embrace the technological future that is unfolding before our eyes? It has been another busy week for us at Mashable, covering the latest contraptions and advancements in the digital world. In case you've been preoccupied, we took the liberty of rounding up all the posts you don't want to miss. As always, our weekly features roundup will get you up to speed on social media, tech, business and lifestyles. With the holidays fast approaching, we've also featured several selections from our "Gift of the Day" series. For all the ways technology and the Internet can enrich your life, read on. For more tech gift suggestions, visit Mashable's Gift of the Day topic page. For more social media news and resources, you can follow Mashable's social media channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook. For more business news and resources, you can follow Mashable's business channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook. For more tech news and resources, you can follow Mashable's tech channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook. For more digital lifestyle news and resources, you can follow Mashable's lifestyle channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.


News Article | July 5, 2011
Site: www.zdnet.com

On Monday, ZDNet UK visited the Royal Society's annual Summer Science Exhibition, which brings together cutting-edge science and technology projects under way at British universities. In one exhibit, academics from the University of St Andrews demonstrated various approaches to render objects invisible. One method is to use materials with the same reflective properties as their background. To demonstrate this, the university researchers filled a container with a mixture of water and geometric shapes made of sodium polyacrylate. Because the reflectivity of sodium polyacrylate is the same as that of water, light does not bounce off an object made of the material when it is immersed in the liquid. Instead, it passes through the material and the water at the same rate, making the object nearly impossible to see. While this technique is a helpful illustration of invisibility via reflectivity, it is impractical because to use it the object must be entirely composed of sodium polyacrylate, a spokesman for St Andrews conceded.

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