Institute for Water Resources

Alexandria, VA, United States

Institute for Water Resources

Alexandria, VA, United States
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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

ALEXANDRIA, VA--(Marketwired - October 24, 2016) - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) released on Monday, October 24 a sources sought notice for analytical and professional navigation support services. The USACE IWR intends to award an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Multiple-Award Task Order (MATOC) contract with a base year plus four option years. The estimated price ceiling for this requirement is approximately $48 million. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was formed 47 years ago to provide the USACE Civil Works Program with the capability to analyze and anticipate emerging navigation trends and issues facing the United States. From its beginnings, one of the core missions of IWR has been to support the Corps Navigation program, including deep and shallow draft coastal and inland systems in the United States and worldwide. Navigation is the largest Corps Business Line, in terms of value, representing about 45 percent of the Corps Civil Works budget. IWR has been tackling the Navigation data and systems challenges coming from an ever increasing demand for products and services transported by water. As such, there remains a compelling need for analytical and professional support to pursue innovative approaches to solving these new problems. IWR is a Field Operating Activity (FOA) under the supervision and direction of the Deputy Commanding General for Civil and Emergency Operations (DCG-CEO) and Director of Civil Works (DCW) for USACE. IWR's challenging mission remains integral to shaping the evolution of Federal Navigation policy as decision-makers at all levels within USACE look to IWR for insights into a host of complex physical, economic, environmental and social issues. HECSA is seeking information on companies that have the capability to provide technical and analytical support services for the IWR that is generally not available within the USACE. The scope of this effort is intended to encompass all aspects of the Civil Works Navigation mission area and other mission areas that connect with Navigation (including Flood Risk Management, Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration, Hydropower, Regulatory, Recreation, and Water Supply, etc.), as well as support to this USACE mission. Interested contractor must be able to perform the following support services: The level of support required varies by each task order, however, in many cases future task orders will require an integration of expertise from a wide variety of these functional areas. Interested contractor must submit to the USACE by no later than November 30, 2016 11:59 p.m. EST the following information: A description of the capabilities that demonstrate the interested firm's ability to support the multiple functional areas listed above [limit 3 pages] A description of company history with regard to (a) how multidisciplinary experience was obtained or developed and (b) types and/or combination of types of awarded contract vehicles (e.g. Cost Reimbursement, IDIQ, Fixed Price, Fixed Price Level of Effort, Time & Materials, etc.) [limit 10 pages] Contract numbers for any completed/in-progress contract of similar work A description of the degree of teaming needed to meet the requirements listed above, including an estimated percentage of subcontracted partners [limit 1 page] Brief discussion of Key Personnel and their experience with the functional areas Size of business (e.g., identify whether the business is a small or large business with regard to the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 541618) To receive the contract, contractors must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database, and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world's largest third-party government registration firm, completes this required Registration on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, or to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


Langsdale S.,U.S. Army | Beall A.,Washington State University | Bourget E.,Institute for Water Resources | Hagen E.,Potamoi LLC | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the American Water Resources Association | Year: 2013

Collaborative Modeling for Decision Support integrates collaborative modeling with participatory processes to inform natural resources decisions. Practitioners and advocates claim that the approach will lead to better water management, balancing interests more effectively and reducing the likelihood of costly legal delays. These claims are easy to make, but the benefits will only be realized if the process is conducted effectively. To provide guidance for how to conduct an effective collaborative modeling process, a task committee cosponsored by the Environmental Water Resources Institute (EWRI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers and by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources developed a set of Principles and Best Practices for anyone who might convene or conduct collaborative modeling processes. The guidance is intended for both conflict resolution professionals and modelers, and our goal is to integrate these two fields in a way that will improve water resources planning and decision making. Here, the set of eight principles is presented along with a selection of associated best practices, illustrated by two different case examples. The complete document is available at: http://www.computeraideddisputeresolution.us/bestpractices/. © 2013 American Water Resources Association.


Pandey B.H.,British Columbia Institute of Technology | Ventura C.E.,University of British Columbia | RioFrio P.,U.S. Federal Aviation Administration | Pummell J.,Institute for Water Resources | Dowling S.,Institute for Water Resources
NCEE 2014 - 10th U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering: Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering | Year: 2014

Recent earthquakes in developing countries suggests that an earthquake of large scale near Kathmandu today could cause human casualty and devastation of a degree that has been observed in Kashmir or Port-au-Prince. The consequences for Nepal if a comparable or a bigger disaster happens in Kathmandu would likely be worse than in Haiti because the Kathmandu Valley is landlocked within a rugged mountainous valley and the city's ability to connect with the outside is limited to air transportation as ground transportation is also susceptible to be dysfunctional in major earthquakes. This paper presents the important aspects of recently developed Earthquake Emergency Response Plan of Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu. It also describes the approach and methodology adopted to develop emergency response action items as well as strategies of rapid assessment, recovery and emergency aid handling for the situation where emergency response system is non-existent at any level of government, institutions and infrastructure facilities. The methodology considered the specific setting of the city and the country in terms of geography, demography, hazard, institutional arrangements, resources and technology available in the country and stakeholder's perceived concerns. The developed methodology is considered to provide a standard for development of earthquake emergency response plan for other infrastructures in the country as well as for other airports in the region.


Stakhiv E.Z.,Institute for Water Resources
Journal of the American Water Resources Association | Year: 2011

Water resources management is in a difficult transition phase, trying to accommodate large uncertainties associated with climate change while struggling to implement a difficult set of principles and institutional changes associated with integrated water resources management. Water management is the principal medium through which projected impacts of global warming will be felt and ameliorated. Many standard hydrological practices, based on assumptions of a stationary climate, can be extended to accommodate numerous aspects of climate uncertainty. Classical engineering risk and reliability strategies developed by the water management profession to cope with contemporary climate uncertainties can also be effectively employed during this transition period, while a new family of hydrological tools and better climate change models are developed. An expansion of the concept of "robust decision making," coupled with existing analytical tools and techniques, is the basis for a new approach advocated for planning and designing water resources infrastructure under climate uncertainty. Ultimately, it is not the tools and methods that need to be revamped as much as the suite of decision rules and evaluation principles used for project justification. They need to be aligned to be more compatible with the implications of a highly uncertain future climate trajectory, so that the hydrologic effects of that uncertainty are correctly reflected in the design of water infrastructure. © 2011 American Water Resources Association.


Stakhiv E.Z.,Institute for Water Resources
IAHS-AISH Publication | Year: 2010

Water resources management is in a difficult transition phase, trying to accommodate the large uncertainties associated with climate change, while struggling with implementing a difficult set of principles and institutional changes associated with integrated water resources management (IWRM) and adaptive management (AM). Water management is the principal medium through which many of the projected impacts of global warming will be felt and ameliorated. Many standard hydrological practices, based on assumptions of a stationary climate and variability, can be extended to accommodate numerous aspects of climate uncertainty. Adaptations of various strategies developed by the water management profession to cope with contemporary uncertainties and climate variability can also be effectively employed during this transition period, as a new family of hydrological tools and better climate change models are developed. "Robust decision-making" is among the new approaches being advocated for planning and designing water resources infrastructure under climate uncertainty. Copyright © 2010 IAHS Press.

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