Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Alexandria, VA, United States

Stakhiv E.Z.,Institute for Water Resources
IAHS-AISH Publication | Year: 2010

Water resources management is in a difficult transition phase, trying to accommodate the large uncertainties associated with climate change, while struggling with implementing a difficult set of principles and institutional changes associated with integrated water resources management (IWRM) and adaptive management (AM). Water management is the principal medium through which many of the projected impacts of global warming will be felt and ameliorated. Many standard hydrological practices, based on assumptions of a stationary climate and variability, can be extended to accommodate numerous aspects of climate uncertainty. Adaptations of various strategies developed by the water management profession to cope with contemporary uncertainties and climate variability can also be effectively employed during this transition period, as a new family of hydrological tools and better climate change models are developed. "Robust decision-making" is among the new approaches being advocated for planning and designing water resources infrastructure under climate uncertainty. Copyright © 2010 IAHS Press. Source


Langsdale S.,U.S. Army | Beall A.,Washington State University | Bourget E.,Institute for Water Resources | Hagen E.,Potamoi LLC | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the American Water Resources Association | Year: 2013

Collaborative Modeling for Decision Support integrates collaborative modeling with participatory processes to inform natural resources decisions. Practitioners and advocates claim that the approach will lead to better water management, balancing interests more effectively and reducing the likelihood of costly legal delays. These claims are easy to make, but the benefits will only be realized if the process is conducted effectively. To provide guidance for how to conduct an effective collaborative modeling process, a task committee cosponsored by the Environmental Water Resources Institute (EWRI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers and by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources developed a set of Principles and Best Practices for anyone who might convene or conduct collaborative modeling processes. The guidance is intended for both conflict resolution professionals and modelers, and our goal is to integrate these two fields in a way that will improve water resources planning and decision making. Here, the set of eight principles is presented along with a selection of associated best practices, illustrated by two different case examples. The complete document is available at: http://www.computeraideddisputeresolution.us/bestpractices/. © 2013 American Water Resources Association. Source


Stakhiv E.Z.,Institute for Water Resources
Journal of the American Water Resources Association | Year: 2011

Water resources management is in a difficult transition phase, trying to accommodate large uncertainties associated with climate change while struggling to implement a difficult set of principles and institutional changes associated with integrated water resources management. Water management is the principal medium through which projected impacts of global warming will be felt and ameliorated. Many standard hydrological practices, based on assumptions of a stationary climate, can be extended to accommodate numerous aspects of climate uncertainty. Classical engineering risk and reliability strategies developed by the water management profession to cope with contemporary climate uncertainties can also be effectively employed during this transition period, while a new family of hydrological tools and better climate change models are developed. An expansion of the concept of "robust decision making," coupled with existing analytical tools and techniques, is the basis for a new approach advocated for planning and designing water resources infrastructure under climate uncertainty. Ultimately, it is not the tools and methods that need to be revamped as much as the suite of decision rules and evaluation principles used for project justification. They need to be aligned to be more compatible with the implications of a highly uncertain future climate trajectory, so that the hydrologic effects of that uncertainty are correctly reflected in the design of water infrastructure. © 2011 American Water Resources Association. Source


Pandey B.H.,British Columbia Institute of Technology | Ventura C.E.,University of British Columbia | RioFrio P.,U.S. Federal Aviation Administration | Pummell J.,Institute for Water Resources | Dowling S.,Institute for Water Resources
NCEE 2014 - 10th U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering: Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering | Year: 2014

Recent earthquakes in developing countries suggests that an earthquake of large scale near Kathmandu today could cause human casualty and devastation of a degree that has been observed in Kashmir or Port-au-Prince. The consequences for Nepal if a comparable or a bigger disaster happens in Kathmandu would likely be worse than in Haiti because the Kathmandu Valley is landlocked within a rugged mountainous valley and the city's ability to connect with the outside is limited to air transportation as ground transportation is also susceptible to be dysfunctional in major earthquakes. This paper presents the important aspects of recently developed Earthquake Emergency Response Plan of Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu. It also describes the approach and methodology adopted to develop emergency response action items as well as strategies of rapid assessment, recovery and emergency aid handling for the situation where emergency response system is non-existent at any level of government, institutions and infrastructure facilities. The methodology considered the specific setting of the city and the country in terms of geography, demography, hazard, institutional arrangements, resources and technology available in the country and stakeholder's perceived concerns. The developed methodology is considered to provide a standard for development of earthquake emergency response plan for other infrastructures in the country as well as for other airports in the region. Source

Discover hidden collaborations