BOZEMAN, MT, United States
BOZEMAN, MT, United States

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Nansen C.,Texas AgriLife Research Center | Nansen C.,Texas Tech University | Herrman T.,Texas A&M University | Swanson R.,Resonon Inc.
Applied Spectroscopy | Year: 2010

There is growing public concern about contaminants in food and feed products, and reflection-based machine vision systems can be used to develop automated quality control systems. An important risk factor in animal feed products is the presence of prohibited ruminant-derived bonemeal that may contain the BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) prion. Animal feed products are highly complex in composition and texture (i.e., vegetable products, mineral supplements, fish and chicken meal), and current contaminant detection systems rely heavily on laborintensive microscopy. In this study, we developed a training data set comprising 3.65 million hyperspectral profiles of which 1.15 million were from bonemeal samples, 2Jl million from twelve other feed materials, and 0.19 million denoting light green background (bottom of Petri dishes holding feed materials). Hyperspectral profiles in 150 spectral bands between 419 and 892 nm were analyzed. The classification approach was based on a sequence of linear discriminant analyses (LDA) to gradually improve the classification accuracy of hyperspectral profiles (reduce level of false positives), which had been classified as bonemeal in previous LDAs. That is, all hyperspectral profiles classified as bonemeal in an initial LDA (31% of these were false positives) were used as input data in a second LDA with new discriminant functions. Hyperspectral profiles classified as bonemeal in LDA2 (false positives were equivalent to 16%) were used as input data in a third LDA. This approach was repeated twelve times, in which at each step hyperspectral profiles were eliminated if they were classified as feed material (not bonemeal). Four independent feed materials were experimentally contaminated with 0-25% (by weight) bonemeal and used for validation. The analysis presented here provides support for development of an automated machine vision to detect bonemeal contamination around the 1% (by weight) level and therefore constitutes an important initial screening tool in comprehensive, rapid, and practically feasible quality control of feed materials. © 2010 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.


Lin M.,U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology | Swanson R.,Resonon Inc. | Moon T.,Resonon Inc. | Smith C.,Resonon Inc. | And 3 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2010

Compact hyperspectral sensors potentially have a wide range of applications, including machine vision, quality control, and surveillance from small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). With the development of Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) focal plane arrays, much of the Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) spectral regime can be accessed with a small hyperspectral imaging system, thereby substantially expanding hyperspectral sensing capabilities. To fully realize this potential, system performance must be well-understood. Here, stray light characterization of a recently-developed push-broom hyperspectral sensor sensitive in the 1 μm-1.7 μm spectral regime is described. The sensor utilizes anamorphic foreoptics that partially decouple image formation along the spatial and spectral axes of the instrument. This design benefits from a reduction in complexity over standard high-performance spectrometer optical designs while maintaining excellent aberration control and spatial and spectral distortion characteristics. The stray light performance characteristics of the anamorphic imaging spectrometer were measured using the spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A description of the measurements and results are presented. Additionally, a stray-light matrix was assembled for the instrument to improve the instrument's spectral accuracy. Transmittance of a silicon wafer was measured to validate this approach. © 2010 Optical Society of America.


Kehoe M.,Resonon Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2010

An automated procedure for lens manufacturing tolerance assignment is described. The procedure makes direct use of Monte Carlo sampling to obtain tolerance assignments. Tolerances are specified so as to minimize manufacturing cost, subject to a constraint on minimum acceptable lens performance. A simulation evaluates the cost-effectiveness of the program and provides quantitative evidence on the cost savings it can provide. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering.


Kehoe M.,Resonon Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

The interactions between errors in manufacturing are examined for ten double Gauss lens specifications drawn from U.S. patents. The particular focus is on center thickness and radius tolerances of doublet lenses in these specifications and on the possibility of specifying these tolerances jointly. A procedure for rapid identification of lenses whose performance would be improved by joint tolerance specification is described. Then benefits of specifying thickness and radius tolerances of doublet lenses jointly are demonstrated using Monte Carlo analysis. © 2014 SPIE.


Nugent P.W.,Montana State University | Shaw J.A.,Montana State University | Kehoe M.R.,Resonon Inc. | Smith C.W.,Resonon Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Optical Engineering | Year: 2010

Measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of digital imagers focused at or near infinity in laboratory or field settings presents difficulties because the optical path is longer than a typical laboratory. Also, digital imagers can be hindered by low-resolution detectors, resulting in the resolution of the optics surpassing that of the detector. We measure the MTF for a short-wave infrared hyperspectral imager developed by Resonon, Inc., of Bozeman, Montana, which exhibits both characteristics. These difficulties are overcome with a technique that uses images of building rooflines in an oversampled, tilted knife-edge-based MTF measurement. The dark rooftops backlit by a uniformly cloudy sky provide the high-contrast edges required to perform knife-edge MTF measurements. The MTF response is measured at five wavelengths across the imager's spectral band: 1085, 1178, 1292, 1548, and 1629 nm. The MTF also is observed at various distances from the roof to investigate performance change with distance. Optimum imaging is observed at a distance of 150 m, potentially a result of imperfect infinity focus and atmospheric turbulence. In a laboratory validation of the MTF algorithm using a monochrome visible imager, the roofline MTF results are similar to results from point-source and sine-card MTF measurements. © 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

During this effort an instrument for calibrating the lunar irradiance will be designed. Such an instrument will lead to reliable exoatmospheric calibration for past, current, and future earth-viewing instruments and improve the accuracy of their data products, which in turn will improve climate change and weather models. The instrument will measure both the solar and lunar irradiances, which will enable cross calibration with the TSIS mission. The proposed instrument concept has been formulated to take advantage of the near-collimated nature of the input signals. The work plan is to develop detailed ray-trace and radiometric models of the instrument. The error budget for the instrument will be analyzed and pre- and post-launch calibration plans will be formulated.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2015

Statement of the Problem: Large-area, high-resolution hyperspectral imaging is needed to accurately understand the carbon-cycle between the atmosphere and terrestrial systems. To do this cost-effectively, small UAVs will be needed, for which there are currently no hyperspectral imagers that meet both the performance requirement of DOE and the size/weight requirements for deployment on small UAVs. How the Problem is Being Addressed: A novel imaging spectrometer design that greatly simplifies the fore-optics of push-broom imaging spectrometers will be designed. This approach will provide excellent imaging and large signal-to-noise ratios across the full 350-2500 nm spectral range specified by this topic. Commercial Applications: Commercial applications include pipeline monitoring, invasive weed mapping, and crop-health monitoring. Key Words: hyperspectral, imaging spectrometer Summary for Members of Congress: A compact, high-performance imager that captures far more information than conventional cameras will be developed for small UAVs. This instrument will be useful for understanding the carbon cycle, monitoring pollution events, and it will also have numerous agriculture applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.19M | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The long-term goal of this effort is to develop an optical module that will reduce stray light within imaging systems, thereby providing more accurate measurements from digital images and increased dynamic range of detection to enable analysis of objects not currently measurable. The present Phase II proposal is aimed at greatly enhancing the analysis of multicolor spectral imaging of fluorescent dyes in proteomics to detect changes in protein levels and protein posttranslational modifications in gel electrophoresis. Potential future applications of the optical module will improve multicolor fluorescence detection in immunohistochemistry and analysis of fluorescent proteins in cells and tissues, microplate reading and microfluidic analysis for new methods of multiplex diagnostics. The system to be developed will be usable on nearly all optical imaging systems so as to broaden the scope of applications and ultimately reduce the cost. The specific aims are to: (1) Develop and characterize a Noise Reduction Module (NoRM). This system will record an initial image, then utilize a feedback loop to turn off the bright pixels and associated stray-light to more accurately measure regions within an image; (2) Demonstrate the NoRM in proteomics applications, which will validate the technology, and enable detection of proteins and patterns of proteins in 2-D gels that are currently too weak to observe (the enhanced protein patterns are expected to have diagnostic value), and guide enhanced electroelution/microfluidic digestion/integrated mass spectral analysis ; and (3) Prepare a production prototype NoRM for a limited scale release by the end of the Phase II effort. This Phase II effort builds on a successful Phase I effort that demonstrated greater than factor of 10 improvement in dynamic range as compared to currently used image bracketing technology. The proposed effort is cross-disciplinary, with expertise required in optical and mechanical design, software development, productionengineering, biochemistry, proteomics, and systems biology. The resulting technology will be useful for proteomics, microscopy, and many other technologies that utilize digital cameras. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The proposed technology will reduce the stray light noise for digital imaging systems, thereby expanding capabilities for proteomics, glycomics, cell biology, diagnostics and any biomedical application that utilizes digital cameras. During this effort, patterns of weakly-expressed proteins andchanges in these proteins, whose signals are currently too weak to be identified in electrophoresis gels will be measured and identified to better understand biological mechanisms, improve development of more specific drugs, and enhance regenerative and preventative medicine.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2016

Large-area, high-resolution hyperspectral imaging is needed to accurately understand the carbon-cycle between the atmosphere and terrestrial systems. To do this cost-effectively, small UAVs will be needed, for which there are currently no hyperspectral imagers that meet both the performance requirement of DOE and the size/weight requirements for deployment on small UAVs. How the Problem is Being Addressed: A novel imaging spectrometer design that greatly simplifies the fore-optics of push-broom imaging spectrometers will be designed. This approach will provide excellent imaging and large signal-to-noise ratios across the full 350-2500 nm spectral range specified by this topic. Commercial Applications: Commercial applications include pipeline monitoring, invasive weed mapping, and crop-health monitoring.


Resonon Inc. | Entity website

Our Company Founded in 2002, Resonon is located in Bozeman, Montana in the heart of the Rocky Mountains. We provide the industry's most affordable hyperspectral imaging systems, as well as custom solutions for complex hyperspectral and optical applications ...

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