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Kaja S.,University of Missouri - Kansas City | Hilgenberg J.D.,University of Missouri - Kansas City | Collins J.L.,University of Missouri - Kansas City | Shah A.A.,University of Missouri - Kansas City | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Biomedical Optics | Year: 2012

Ovarian carcinoma has the highest lethality rate of gynecologic tumors, largely attributed to the late-stage diagnosis of the disease. Reliable tools for both accurate diagnosis and early detection of disease onset are lacking, and presently less than 20% of ovarian cancers are detected at an early stage. Protein biomarkers that allow the discrimination of early and late stages of ovarian serous carcinomas are urgently needed as they would enable monitoring pre-symptomatic aspects of the disease, disease progression, and the efficacy of intervention therapies. We compare the absolute and relative protein levels of six protein biomarkers for ovarian cancer in five different established ovarian cancer cell lines, utilizing both quantitative immunoblot analysis and a guided-mode resonance (GMR) bioassay detection system that utilizes a label-free optical biosensor readout. The GMR sensor approach provided highly accurate, consistent, and reproducible quantification of protein biomarkers as validated by quantitative immunoblotting, as well as enhanced sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for quantification and detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. We identified fibronectin, apolipoprotein A1, and TIMP3 as potential protein biomarkers for the differential diagnosis of primary versus metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Future studies are needed to confirm the suitability of protein biomarkers tested herein in patient samples. © 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).


Wawro D.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | Koulen P.,University of Missouri - Kansas City | Ding Y.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | Zimmerman S.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | And 2 more authors.
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2010

A high-accuracy sensor system has been developed that provides near-instantaneous detection of biomarker proteins as indicators of ovarian serous papillary carcinoma. Based upon photonic guided-mode resonance technology, these highresolution sensors employ multiple resonance peaks to rapidly test for relevant proteins in complex biological samples. This label-free sensor approach requires minimal sample processing and has the capability to measure multiple agents simultaneously and in real time. A detection system has been developed and performance characterized. Identification and quantification of protein biomarkers that are up- or downregulated in blood and serum as indicators of ovarian cancer will be presented. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering.


Wawro D.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | Zimmerman S.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | Magnussona R.,University of Texas at Arlington | Koulen P.,University of Missouri - Kansas City
Optics InfoBase Conference Papers | Year: 2011

A high-accuracy biosensor system has been developed to provide rapid detection of biomarker proteins as indicators of ovarian cancer. This photonic detection system is based upon guided-mode resonance sensor technology. The buildup of the attaching biolayer can be monitored directly, without use of chemical tags, by following the corresponding resonance shift with a spectrometer or detector array. Additionally, these high-resolution sensors employ multiple resonance peaks at identical physical location on the sensor surface. Each of these resonance peaks responds uniquely to the detection event, thereby enriching the data set available for quantification. The peaks result from individual, polarization-dependent resonant leaky modes that are the foundation of this technology. Examples are presented for detection of ovarian cancer biomarkers (fibronectin and apoliprotein A-1) in serum and cell culture supernatant, with detection sensitivities to ~20 ng/ml. Minimal nonspecific binding was measured in cell media and serum backgrounds. We also present an example dual-polarization resonance response with corresponding backfitting results that illustrate the capability to distinguish between changes at the sensor surface due to biolayer adhesion and those due to sample background changes. © 2011 SPIE-OSA.


Wawro D.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | Zimmerman S.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | Magnusson R.,Resonant Sensors Incorporated RSI | Magnusson R.,University of Texas at Arlington | Koulen P.,University of Missouri - Kansas City
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2011

A high-accuracy biosensor system has been developed to provide rapid detection of biomarker proteins as indicators of ovarian cancer. This photonic detection system is based upon guided-mode resonance sensor technology. The buildup of the attaching biolayer can be monitored directly, without use of chemical tags, by following the corresponding resonance shift with a spectrometer or detector array. Additionally, these high-resolution sensors employ multiple resonance peaks at identical physical location on the sensor surface. Each of these resonance peaks responds uniquely to the detection event, thereby enriching the data set available for quantification. The peaks result from individual, polarization-dependent resonant leaky modes that are the foundation of this technology. Examples are presented for detection of ovarian cancer biomarkers (fibronectin and apoliprotein A-1) in serum and cell culture supernatant, with detection sensitivities to ∼20 ng/ml. Minimal nonspecific binding was measured in cell media and serum backgrounds. We also present an example dual-polarization resonance response with corresponding backfitting results that illustrate the capability to distinguish between changes at the sensor surface due to biolayer adhesion and those due to sample background changes. © 2011 SPIE-OSA.

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