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L'Isle-sur-la-Sorgue, France

Desport J.-C.,Reseau Linut | Desport J.-C.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Desport J.-C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Villemonteix C.,Reseau Linut | And 7 more authors.
Nutrition Clinique et Metabolisme | Year: 2015

Introduction and objectives: Malnutrition and frailty are frequent public health problems, in particular in the elderly people. The French Ministry for the Social Affairs and Health (MSAH) decided in 2012 to promote a pilot program including the realization of 10 conferences and three electronic or paper tools on this subject. It requested in this direction the French-speaking Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism Society (SFNEP), which chose for its application the nutrition network LINUT, established in area of Limousin, the 2nd oldest area of Europe. Methods: The program was validated by the MSAH and the SFNEP. The conferences had as a target the health professionals and the general public, and were announced with the media. They were evaluated by an index of satisfaction, a general knowledge before/after test and a questionnaire applied one or three months after the conferences. The tools were: the proposal to put on the websites of the institutions partners of the network a link with the site general public of the SFNEP, the creation of 12 simple, electronic and paper cards, treating various aspects of malnutrition in the elderly, the realization of one recipe book in mixed-texture of raw fruit and vegetables, including their nutritional composition and visual. Results: Eleven conferences took place, involving 947 people (average: 86.1 ± 55.4) on the whole of the area. The frequentation was stronger if the conferences were leaned with workshops or the regional day of the Liaison Committees for Alimentation and Nutrition (LCANs). The subjective appreciations and the before/after tests were favourable, whereas the remote questionnaire appeared unsuited. Only 19% of the requested institutions agreed to integrate the link with the site of the SFNEP. The electronic and paper cards were widely diffused. The book included 50 mixed-texture cooking recipes. The regional press published 16 articles on these actions, and a TF1 report was carried out at the time of a workshop. The allocated budget was consumed in accordance with the forecasts. Conclusion: A program of this type is applicable, and appears effective as for the number of people concerned with the conferences, the diffusion of the tools and the media impact. © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. Source


Desport J.-C.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Jesus P.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Terrier G.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Massoulard A.,Reseau Linut | And 8 more authors.
Nutrition Clinique et Metabolisme | Year: 2011

The taste is a sense, mainly oral, including five basic flavors: sweet, salty, bitter, sour and umami. It is linked with olfaction and salivation. The most frequent taste disorders are dysgeusia or hypogeusia. Ageusia is scarce and hypergeusia very uncommon. Taste assessment needs a precise discussion with the patient, in order to find a cause of the trouble. Otorhinolaryngological and neurological examinations are needed. Chemical or electrical stimulation tests are possible by a specialist. A large number of causes for taste troubles have been recognized. Age, pregnancy and menopause are physiologically involved. Many treatments have been incriminated, especially radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Oral disorders, vitamins or trace-elements insufficiency, alcohol or tobacco intoxication, salivary troubles or some psychiatric disorders are frequently in cause as well as several chronic or post-traumatic diseases. Taste troubles are deleterious on quality of life, appetite, and are well-known risk factors for malnutrition in elderly. Their treatment is difficult, needing if possible the suppression of cause. Taste enhancers can be used as well as advices by a dietician. An associated malnutrition has to be treated. © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. Source


Jesus P.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Desport J.C.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Desport J.C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Massoulard A.,Reseau Linut | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging | Year: 2012

Introduction: Limousin in France has the second oldest regional population in Europe, with people over 65-years-old who have Alzheimer's disease accounting for more than 9%. In France as a whole, a large number of residents in nursing homes (NH) have dementia, leading to many nutritional problems. LINUT is a health network that assesses the nutritional status of elderly NH residents and provides support where necessary. Aims of the present study were to use this network to evaluate the nutritional status of NH residents with and without dementia and to review changes after 4 months of intervention. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted by a doctor and a dietician at baseline (T0) and 4 months (T4) among residents at the 26 NH in Limousin that agreed to take part. The evaluation criteria included presence of dementia, depression and autonomy, weight, height, body mass index, Mini Nutritional Assessement (MNA&trad;), and a 3-day survey of food intake. Results: The 346 residents assessed at T0 were aged 87.9±6.9 years, 83.4% were women, 66.8% had dementia, 53.3% were malnourished and 27.4% obese. Autonomy was not affected by obesity. Residents with dementia had a lower Activities of Daily Living score and a lower weight than non-demented individuals (2.2±1.2 vs. 2.7±1.7 p=0.03 and 60.1±16.3 vs. 64.7±20.0 kg p=0.03, respectively), were more often malnourished (56.1% vs. 46.4% p=0.004) and less often obese (22.0% vs. 39.1% p=0.004) but consumed more protein (62.6±17.8 vs. 58.2±16.9 g/d p=0.04, 1.1±0.4 vs. 1.0±0.4 g/kg/d p=0.005). Energy intake was at the lower limit of French recommendations (26.4±8.8 vs. >25.0 kcal/kg/d). Assessment of all residents at T4 showed improved MNA&trad; (+0.4 points/month p=0.02), protein intake (+3.3 g/d p=0.0007), and energy intake (+41.4 kcal/d p=0.01 and 0.1 kcal/kg/d p=0.03). Variations in prevalences of malnutrition and obesity were not statistically significant. MNA&trad; increased in the dementia group (+0.29±0.8 points/month p=0.003). All other changes were comparable, and nutritional status did not differ more between the two groups at T4 than at T0. Conclusion: The prevalence of dementia was high in the population studied. Malnutrition was the main problem, particularly if residents had dementia. Protein intake was satisfactory, but energy intake often insufficient. The nutritional status of dementia patients improved after 4 months of follow-up, suggesting that effective action to support such services would be worthwhile. Source


Jesus P.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Desport J.C.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Desport J.C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Massoulard A.,Reseau Linut | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging | Year: 2012

Introduction: Limousin in France has the second oldest regional population in Europe, with people over 65-years-old who have Alzheimer's disease accounting for more than 9%. In France as a whole, a large number of residents in nursing homes (NH) have dementia, leading to many nutritional problems. LINUT is a health network that assesses the nutritional status of elderly NH residents and provides support where necessary. Aims of the present study were to use this network to evaluate the nutritional status of NH residents with and without dementia and to review changes after 4 months of intervention. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted by a doctor and a dietician at baseline (T0) and 4 months (T4) among residents at the 26 NH in Limousin that agreed to take part. The evaluation criteria included presence of dementia, depression and autonomy, weight, height, body mass index, Mini Nutritional Assessement (MNA™), and a 3-day survey of food intake. Results: The 346 residents assessed at T0 were aged 87.9±6.9 years, 83.4% were women, 66.8% had dementia, 53.3% were malnourished and 27.4% obese. Autonomy was not affected by obesity. Residents with dementia had a lower Activities of Daily Living score and a lower weight than non-demented individuals (2.2±1.2 vs. 2.7±1.7 p=0.03 and 60.1±16.3 vs. 64.7±20.0 kg p=0.03, respectively), were more often malnourished (56.1% vs. 46.4% p=0.004) and less often obese (22.0% vs. 39.1% p=0.004) but consumed more protein (62.6±17.8 vs. 58.2±16.9 g/d p=0.04, 1.1±0.4 vs. 1.0±0.4 g/kg/d p=0.005). Energy intake was at the lower limit of French recommendations (26.4±8.8 vs. >25.0 kcal/kg/d). Assessment of all residents at T4 showed improved MNA™ (+0.4 points/month p=0.02), protein intake (+3.3 g/d p=0.0007), and energy intake (+41.4 kcal/d p=0.01 and 0.1 kcal/kg/d p=0.03). Variations in prevalences of malnutrition and obesity were not statistically significant. MNA™ increased in the dementia group (+0.29±0.8 points/month p=0.003). All other changes were comparable, and nutritional status did not differ more between the two groups at T4 than at T0. Conclusion: The prevalence of dementia was high in the population studied. Malnutrition was the main problem, particularly if residents had dementia. Protein intake was satisfactory, but energy intake often insufficient. The nutritional status of dementia patients improved after 4 months of follow-up, suggesting that effective action to support such services would be worthwhile. © 2012 Serdi and Springer Verlag France. Source

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