Research Unit Animal Reproduction and Developmental Biology

science of, Tunisia

Research Unit Animal Reproduction and Developmental Biology

science of, Tunisia
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Alwasel S.H.,King Saud University | Harrath A.,King Saud University | Aljarallah J.S.,King Saud University | Abotalib Z.,King Saud University | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Human Biology | Year: 2013

Objectives: We have reported that changes in the lifestyle of pregnant women during Ramadan affect more than one generation. In a series of newborn babies in Saudi Arabia, those whose mothers had been in utero during Ramadan differed from those whose mothers had not been in utero during Ramadan. These were unexpected findings and require replication. Methods: We examined body size at birth in 1,321 babies (682 boys and 639 girls) born in Gafsa, a small city in Tunisia. Results: Babies whose mothers had been in utero during Ramadan were smaller and thinner, and had smaller placentas, than those whose mothers had not been in utero during Ramadan. After adjustment for sex, the babies were 93 g lighter (95% confidence interval, 32-153, P=0.003) than those whose mother had not been in utero during Ramadan, their mean ponderal index was 0.52 kg/m3 lower (0.24-0.79, P<0.001) and their placental weight was 21 g lower (5-37, P=0.01). The findings did not differ by trimester of maternal exposure to Ramadan. They were similar in boys and girls and in primiparous and multiparous mothers Conclusion: This study provides further evidence that changes in lifestyle during Ramadan have intergenerational effects. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Alwasel S.H.,King Saud University | Harrath A.-H.,Research Unit Animal Reproduction and Developmental Biology | Aljarallah J.S.,King Saud University | Abotalib Z.,King Saud University | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Human Biology | Year: 2013

Objectives: Studies of the placenta in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia have led to the suggestion that tissue along the length and breadth of its surface has different functions. A recent study in Saudi Arabia showed that the body size of newborn babies was related to the breadth of the surface at birth but not to its length. We have now examined whether the association between placental breadth and body size reflects large size of the baby from an early stage of gestation or rapid growth between early and late gestation. Methods: We studied 230 women who gave birth to singleton babies in King Khalid Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In total, 176 had ultrasound measurements both before 28 weeks and at 28 weeks or later, which we define as early and late gestation. We used these to calculate growth velocities between early and late gestation, which we expressed as the change in standard deviation scores over a 10-week period. Results: The breadth of the placental surface was correlated with fetal growth velocity. The correlation coefficients were 0.24 (P=0.002) for the head circumference, 0.24 (P=0.001) for the biparietal diameter and 0.34 (P<0.001) for the abdominal circumference. The length of the surface was not related to fetal growth velocity. Conclusions: Tissue along the breadth of the placental surface may be more important than tissue along the length in the transfer of nutrients from mother to baby. This may be part of a wider phenomenon of regional differences in function across the placental surface. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 25:534-537, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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