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Falenski A.,Research Scientists | Filter M.,Research Scientists | Thons C.,Research Scientists | Weiser A.A.,Research Scientists | And 7 more authors.
Biosecurity and Bioterrorism | Year: 2013

Since the 2001 anthrax attack in the United States, awareness of threats originating from bioterrorism has grown. This led internationally to increased research efforts to improve knowledge of and approaches to protecting human and animal populations against the threat from such attacks. A collaborative effort in this context is the extension of the open-source Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeler (STEM) simulation and modeling software for agro-or bioterrorist crisis scenarios. STEM, originally designed to enable community-driven public health disease models and simulations, was extended with new features that enable integration of proprietary data as well as visualization of agent spread along supply and production chains. STEM now provides a fully developed open-source software infrastructure supporting critical modeling tasks such as ad hoc model generation, parameter estimation, simulation of scenario evolution, estimation of effects of mitigation or management measures, and documentation. This open-source software resource can be used free of charge. Additionally, STEM provides critical features like built-in worldwide data on administrative boundaries, transportation networks, or environmental conditions (eg, rainfall, temperature, elevation, vegetation). Users can easily combine their own confidential data with built-in public data to create customized models of desired resolution. STEM also supports collaborative and joint efforts in crisis situations by extended import and export functionalities. In this article we demonstrate specifically those new software features implemented to accomplish STEM application in agro-or bioterrorist crisis scenarios. © 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


News Article | March 25, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

The top clean tech jobs for this week include listings for inside sales for a building performance instrument company, an energy storage research scientist, an energy storage project manager, a systems engineer for a self-driving car initiative, and more. As part of our collaboration with other projects within the Important Media network, we’ve partnered with our sister site Green Job Post to bring you a weekly summary of the top clean tech job listings. We’ve also set up a dedicated clean tech jobs newsletter to deliver these weekly listings to your inbox, and there are a number of other green job listings newsletters available (see below), including one for all new job listings. The top clean tech job listings for the week of March 25th, 2016: Inside Technical Sales for Blower Doors & Duct Testers We are a dynamic, leading manufacturer of instrumentation, training and software that is used in analyzing building performance of a wide range of buildings from houses to high-rises in 60 countries. About you: You will be required to provide professional, timely and knowledgeable customer service while optimizing sales opportunities for a variety of our products. You must be willing to complete training to learn how to use our equipment so you can apply that experience to the sales process. You already have considerable experience in a sales position, preferably in a technical environment. Research Scientists, Energy Storage: IBM Energy Storage Science and Solutions group at IBM Research-Almaden is looking for long-term supplemental research scientists (Post-Doctoral Researchers) who will perform cutting edge research on next generation energy storage projects. The successful candidates will perform hands-on experiments and data analysis on energy storage devices including metal-air battery systems. Backgrounds on electrochemistry and/or metal-air batteries are plus but not required. The candidates must have proven written and oral communication skills with the ability to focus on project metrics. The candidate will interact with a large, technically diverse, distributed team across IBM and external partners. Project Manager/Director, Energy Storage: Invenergy Invenergy drives innovation in energy. Powered by decades of entrepreneurial experience and unparalleled execution, we solve the energy challenges facing our customers and communities. We provide power generation and storage solutions at scale around the world to create a cleaner energy future. As an Energy Storage Project Manager/Director, you will manage utility scale energy storage projects throughout the United States. Last year, Invenergy won Energy Storage North America’s 2015 Innovation Award for Centralized Storage. Systems Engineer, Motion Control (Self-Driving Car): Google X The self-driving car project aims to improve people’s lives by transforming mobility and making it easier and safer for everyone to get around, regardless of their ability to drive. So far, we’ve self-driven over 1 million miles and are currently out on the streets of Mountain View, California and Austin, Texas. Google’s self-driving car program hires systems engineers to ensure we are solving the right problems during the design phase, and to answer the questions “did we build this right” and “did we build the right thing” during the test and evaluation phase. Get green job notifications in your industry! Subscribe to:   Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters & First Followers Want.”   Come attend CleanTechnica’s 1st “Cleantech Revolution Tour” event → in Berlin, Germany, April 9–10.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article | September 15, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

Researchers with the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center successfully developed a synthetic polymer that can transport a drug into lung cancer cells without going inside of normal lung cells. Since conventional chemo drugs indiscriminately kill all rapidly dividing cells to halt the growth of cancer, these selective nanoparticles could decrease side effects by reducing drug accumulation in normal cells. “The discovery that nanoparticles can be selective to certain cells based only on their physical and chemical properties has profound implications for nanoparticle-based therapies because cell type specificity of drug carriers could alter patient outcomes in the clinic,” says corresponding author Dr. Daniel Siegwart, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry at UT Southwestern Medical Center and with Simmons Cancer Center. “At the same time, a deeper understanding of nanoparticle interactions in the body opens the door to predict patient responses to existing liposome and nanoparticle therapies, and offers the potential to create future drug carriers customized according to individual genetic profiles.” The findings appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The scientists tested hundreds of polymers to make the surprising discovery that cells could respond differently to the same drug carrier, even when those cancerous and normal cells came from the lungs of the same patient. “These functional polyester nanoparticles provide an exciting alternative approach for selective drug delivery to tumor cells that may improve efficacy and reduce adverse side effects of cancer therapies,” says co-author Dr. John Minna, Professor and Director of the Nancy B. and Jake L. Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, and Director of the W.A. “Tex” and Deborah Moncrief Jr. Center for Cancer Genetics at UT Southwestern. The researchers developed new chemical reactions to create a diverse library of polymers that could deliver nucleic acid drugs while possessing enough structural diversity to discover cancer cell-specific nanoparticles. This is an important step to improving tailored cancer therapies to an individual’s specific genetic makeup. “The ability to specifically target cancer cells using nanoparticles could alter how we administer drugs to patients,” says Minna, Professor of Pharmacology and Internal Medicine, and with Simmons Cancer Center, who holds the Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research, and the Max L. Thomas Distinguished Chair in Molecular Pulmonary Oncology. “It is already possible to use genetic sequencing to customize drug regimens for each patient. We may also be able to customize the drug carrier to predictably improve patient responses.” Nanoparticles are tiny spheres (1,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair) that can improve the solubility and delivery of drugs to cells. In this study, Cancer Center researchers delivered short interfering RNA (siRNA)-based drugs to disrupt the functioning and growth of tumor cells by eliminating the proteins the cells need to survive. Amazingly, the cancer selective nanoparticles stayed inside of tumors in mice for more than one week, while nonselective control nanoparticles were cleared within a few hours. This translated to improved siRNA-mediated cancer cell death and significant suppression of tumor growth. Support for this latest research came from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT), Welch Foundation, American Cancer Society, UTSW’s Friends of the Comprehensive Cancer Center, the UTSW Translational Pilot Program, and the NIH National Cancer Institute SPORE grant in Lung Cancer. The Special Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Lung Cancer program, now in its 18th year, is the largest thoracic oncology effort in the U.S. Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study are Research Scientists Dr. Yunfeng Yan and Dr. Kenneth Huffman; Postdoctoral Researchers Dr. Hu Xiong and Dr. Petra Kos; Graduate Student Researchers Jason Miller and Sussana Elkassih with the UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences; Dr. James Kim, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and with the Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research; Dr. Li Liu, Assistant Professor of Radiology; Dr. Kejin Zhou, Assistant Instructor with Simmons Cancer Center; and researchers Dr. Ryan Carstens and John Norman. The Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in North Texas and one of just 47 NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the nation. Simmons Cancer Center includes 13 major cancer care programs. In addition, the Center’s education and training programs support and develop the next generation of cancer researchers and clinicians. Simmons Cancer Center is among only 30 U.S. cancer research centers to be designated by the NCI as a National Clinical Trials Network Lead Academic Participating Site.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

LOS ANGELES, CA--(Marketwired - Oct 24, 2016) - Stellar Biotechnologies, Inc. ( : SBOT), the leader in sustainable manufacture of a key protein utilized in multiple immunotherapy development pipelines targeting cancers, Alzheimer's and lupus, among other diseases, announced today that Gregory T. Baxter, PhD, will join the company's management team in the new role of Executive Vice President of Corporate Development, effective December 1, 2016. Dr. Baxter, a current member of Stellar's Board of Directors and its Scientific Advisory Board, will lead the company's corporate development activities, including joint ventures and business development, as well as the expansion of Stellar's production and manufacturing capabilities. Stellar previously announced the development of a second production site in Baja California, Mexico and a joint venture, Neostell S.A.S., with French partner Neovacs S.A. for manufacturing immunotherapy products for Neovacs and potentially other third-party customers utilizing KLH-based therapeutic vaccines. "Greg's in-depth understanding of our business and extensive business experience in biotechnology, pharmaceutical drug development and aquaculture make him a uniquely qualified choice to support our growth opportunities," said Stellar President and CEO Frank Oakes. "He will take the lead oversight role in our Neostell joint venture and guide our strategic planning and operations." Dr. Baxter is a published author and holds over 20 patents on various aspects of molecular biology and biochemistry, and has served as an executive and scientist for several biotechnology corporations and foundations. Since 2001, he has been a Senior Scientist in the Department of Clinical Drug Development for CCS Associates, Inc. He also serves as Adjunct Associate Professor at Cornell University in the College of Chemical Engineering and on the Founders Board of Stanford University's StartX Med Program. Dr. Baxter's background spans both science and business arenas including Program Director for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships; Founder and CSO of Hurel Corporation; Founder and CEO of Aegen Biosciences; and Research Scientists for Molecular Devices Corporation. Dr. Baxter received his PhD in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Baxter said that Stellar provides an exciting opportunity to work in a pivotal area for multiple indications. "KLH-conjugated vaccines have demonstrated great promise and our collaborators have a number of exciting clinical milestones ahead. I look forward to advancing the sustainable production and manufacturing of GMP-grade KLH and paving the way for more KLH-based approaches to immunotherapy," he said. About Stellar Based north of Los Angeles at the Port of Hueneme, Stellar Biotechnologies, Inc. ( : SBOT) is the leader in sustainable manufacture of Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (KLH), an important immune-stimulating protein used in wide-ranging therapeutic and diagnostic markets. KLH is both an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in many new immunotherapies (targeting cancer, immune disorders, Alzheimer's and inflammatory diseases) as well as a finished product for measuring immune status. Stellar is unique in its proprietary methods, facilities, and KLH technology. The company is committed to meeting the growing demand for commercial-scale supplies of GMP grade KLH, ensuring environmentally sound KLH production, and developing KLH-based active immunotherapies. Stellar Forward-Looking Statements This press release may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of words such as "anticipate," "believe," "plan," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "will," "would," "could," "should," "might," "potential," or "continue" and variations or similar expressions. Readers should not unduly rely on these forward-looking statements, which are not a guarantee of future performance. There can be no assurance that forward-looking statements will prove to be accurate, as all such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause actual results or future events to differ materially from the forward-looking statements. Such risks include, but may not be limited to: general economic and business conditions; technology changes; competition; changes in strategy or development plans; availability of funds and resources; governmental regulations and the ability or failure to comply with governmental regulations; the timing of Stellar's or its partners' anticipated results, including in connection with clinical trials; the ability to meet the goals of Stellar's joint ventures and strategic partnerships; and other factors referenced in Stellar's filings with securities regulators. For a discussion of further risks and uncertainties related to the Stellar's business, please refer to the Stellar's public company reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the British Columbia Securities Commission. All forward-looking statements are made as of the date hereof and are subject to change. Except as required by law, Stellar assumes no obligation to update such statements. This press release does not constitute an offer or solicitation of an offer for sale of any securities in any jurisdiction, including the United States.


News Article | September 16, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Researchers from the A*STAR’s Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) reported that they developed a new CRISPR-related protein that can modify DNA in living cells while minimizing unintended alterations. One of the major problems of the existing gold standard for gene-editing, CRISPR-Cas, is unintended cell modifications. Making changes to DNA more accurately can avoid dismal consequences and open the door to treatments for diseases with few options. This new protein, called iCas, can be induced by the drug tamoxifen, which is commonly used to treat and prevent breast cancer. When tamoxifen is present iCas will edit the target DNA site, but if the drug is not present iCas is switched off. “DNA is like an instruction manual that tells living cells how to behave, so if we can rewrite the instructions in our manual, we will be able to gain control over what the cells are supposed to do,” lead investigator Dr. Tan Meng How, Senior Research Scientists of Stem Cell & Regenerative Biology at GIS, and assistant professor at NTU’s School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, said in a prepared statement. “Our engineered iCas protein is like a light switch that can be readily turned on and off as desired. It also outperforms other existing methods in terms of response time and reliability.” The researchers noted that in this study, published in Nature Chemical Biology, iCas had faster response times and was able to be turned on and off repeatedly, leading to more precise control of where and when DNA editing happens. They said it outperformed other chemical-inducible CRISPR-Cas technologies.  Precise control is critical to gene-editing and the authors hope this new development will lead to more personalized approaches to human disease. Image: The iCas protein (stained in red) created by Singapore scientists is shown moving into the cells' nuclei to make changes to the DNA (stained in blue). The pink region indicates that iCas is positioned at the DNA to perform its function. (Source: A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore)


News Article | February 23, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Millions of people face the detrimental effects of climate change and air pollution on their health as it is now dubbed the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Research Scientists predict that if the United States would cut carbon emissions, it may save about 295,000 lives by 2030. Researchers from Duke University and the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies said if the carbon emissions will be reduced enough to avoid a 2-degree Celsius increase in global warming, it could prevent premature deaths in the coming years. "Many people view climate change as a future problem, but our analysis shows that reducing emissions that cause warming — many of which also contribute to air pollution — could benefit public health here and now," said Drew T. Shindell, from Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment. Reducing carbon emissions could also save about $250 billion worth of health benefits because of overall improved public health of residents. This means that the large amount of savings would exceed the cost of implementing better transportation and clean energy programs. "Near-term national benefits are valued at ~$250 billion (140 billion to 1,050 billion) per year, which is likely to exceed implementation costs. Including longer-term, worldwide climate impacts, benefits roughly quintuple, becoming ~5-10 times larger than estimated implementation costs," the researchers concluded and published in the journal Nature. "Achieving the benefits, however, would require both larger and broader emissions reductions than those in current legislation or regulations," they added. By 2030, an estimated 175,000 premature deaths could be prevented while clean transportation can also prevent about 120,000 premature deaths, annually thereafter. Carbon and fuel emissions contribute not only to the growing problem of climate change, but also the increasing amount of particulate pollution matter in the air. Small pieces of these pollutants may pose serious health problems such as respiratory problems, cardiovascular disorders and premature death. Previous studies have linked air pollution to many diseases. The inhalation of polluted air could aggravate the condition of people already suffering from respiratory diseases, such as asthma or chronic obstructive respiratory disorder (COPD). Currently, it is estimated that air pollution kills 3 million people each year and by 2050, the figure could increase two fold.


Elustondo D.,Research Scientists | Oliveira L.,Research Scientists | Ananias R.A.,University of Bío Bío
Drying Technology | Year: 2013

This article explores the possibility of using a simplified but intuitive method to quickly assess the potential benefits of sorting lumber before industrial kiln drying. The method consists of using scatter plots to visualize the probability of obtaining a certain drying result, such as final moisture content, as a function of a property of the green lumber that can be measured in practice. The method was first validated with four drying runs of 116 mm × 52 mm hemlock lumber: one run contained unsorted lumber and the others contained the same type of lumber but sorted into low, medium, and high groups depending on the electrical capacitance of the green wood. After validation, the scatter plots were used to assess the benefits of two typical industrial sorting strategies, namely, sorting by electric capacitance and sorting by weight. It was found that both methods have the potential to increase lumber production and reduce over dried lumber in approximately the same magnitude. For a typical industrial schedule, sorting into three groups reduced the drying time by approximately 10% and over dried lumber to practically zero. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Johnston J.W.,University of Abertay Dundee | Johnston J.W.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Pimbley I.,University of Abertay Dundee | Harding K.,Research Scientists | Benson E.E.,Research Scientists
Cryo-Letters | Year: 2010

An HPLC method has been optimised to measure 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) in DNA and germplasm with the objective of using the adduct as a marker of cryostorage stability. The encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation protocol was adapted as a model system for assessing the formation of 8OHdG from alginate-encapsulated DNA of calf thymus (CT) and currant species (Ribes) exposed to temperatures of -20 and -196°C. The presence of H 2O2 exacerbated the formation of 8OHdG in encapsulated CT and Ribes DNA. Production of the oxidized adduct was lower in the plant system. A reduction in residual water following osmotic dehydration and evaporative desiccation was associated with reduced adduct formation in encapsulated DNA. No significant differences in 8OHdG adduct formation were observed in plants regenerated from cryopreserved Ribes meristems derived from genotypes known to have differential tolerance to cryopreservation. © CryoLetters.


Skyba M.,University of P.J. Šafarik | Urbanova M.,University of P.J. Šafarik | Kapchina-Toteva V.,Sofia University | Kosuth J.,University of P.J. Šafarik | And 2 more authors.
Cryo-Letters | Year: 2010

Hypericum perforatum L. in vitro cultured shoot tips were characterised at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels following recovery from cryogenic treatment using the plant vitrification solutions PVS2 and PVS3. This comparative study revealed an increase in recovery and regrowth of explants cryoprotected with PVS3. Among the physiological markers only lipid peroxidation in the regenerants treated with PVS2 significantly increased indicating membrane damage. Genotype-specific interactions were found in most characteristics studied, with some variation detected within control and cryopreserved samples. Analyses of metabolite biosynthesis and genetic stability showed no significant differences in hypericin content, RAPD and minisatellite amplification profiles between PVS2 - and PVS3-treated explants. This study demonstrates and discusses the criteria selective for PVS3 to improve the cryopreservation of H, perforatum L. © CryoLetters.

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