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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— This report studies the ERP Software market status and outlook of global and United States, from angles of players, regions, product types and end industries; this report analyzes the top players in global and United States market, and splits the ERP Software market by product type and applications/end industries. The global ERP Software market is valued at XX million USD in 2016 and is expected to reach XX million USD by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. The Asia-Pacific will occupy for more market share in following years, especially in China, also fast growing India and Southeast Asia regions. North America, especially The United States, will still play an important role which cannot be ignored. Any changes from United States might affect the development trend of ERP Software. United States plays an important role in global market, with market size of xx million USD in 2016 and will be xx million USD in 2022, with a CAGR of XX. Geographically, this report is segmented into several key regions, with sales, revenue, market share (%) and growth Rate (%) of ERP Software in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering United States North America Europe Asia-Pacific South America Middle East and Africa The major players in global and United States ERP Software market, including Beisen Tita, JZ Soft, Digiwin Soft, ORACLE, EXACT Macola, IQMS Manufacturing ERP, SAP, SAGE, EPICOR, KRONOS The On the basis of product, the ERP Software market is primarily split into On Premise Cloud Based On the basis on the end users/applications, this report covers Software Technology Manufacturing Retail Telecommunications Logistics Pharmaceutical Banking and Mortgage Others 2017-2022 ERP Software Report on Global and United States Market, Status and Forecast, by Players, Types and Applications 1 Methodology and Data Source 1.1 Methodology/Research Approach 1.1.1 Research Programs/Design 1.1.2 Market Size Estimation 1.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation 1.2 Data Source 2.1.1 Secondary Sources 2.1.2 Primary Sources 1.3 Disclaimer 2 ERP Software Market Overview 2.1 ERP Software Product Overview 2.2 ERP Software Market Segment by Type 2.2.1 On Premise 2.2.2 Cloud Based 2.3 Global ERP Software Product Segment by Type 2.3.1 Global ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Growth (%) by Types (2012, 2016 and 2022) 2.3.2 Global ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Market Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) 2.3.3 Global ERP Software Revenue (Million USD) and Market Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) 2.3.4 Global ERP Software Price (USD/Unit) by Type (2012-2017) 2.4 United States ERP Software Product Segment by Type 2.4.1 United States ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Growth by Types (2012, 2016 and 2022) 2.4.2 United States ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Market Share by Types (2012-2017) 2.4.3 United States ERP Software Revenue (Million USD) and Market Share by Types (2012-2017) 2.4.4 United States ERP Software Price (USD/Unit) by Type (2012-2017) 3 ERP Software Application/End Users 3.1 ERP Software Segment by Application/End Users 3.1.1 Software Technology 3.1.2 Manufacturing 3.1.3 Retail 3.1.4 Telecommunications 3.1.5 Logistics 3.2 Global ERP Software Product Segment by Application 3.2.1 Global ERP Software Sales (K Units) and CGAR (%) by Applications (2012, 2016 and 2022) 3.2.2 Global ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Market Share (%) by Applications (2012-2017) 3.3 United States ERP Software Product Segment by Application 3.3.1 United States ERP Software Sales (K Units) and CGAR (%) by Applications (2012, 2016 and 2022) 3.3.2 United States ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Market Share (%) by Applications (2012-2017) 4 ERP Software Market Status and Outlook by Regions 4.1 Global Market Status and Outlook by Regions 4.1.1 Global ERP Software Market Size and CAGR by Regions (2012, 2016 and 2022) 4.1.2 North America 4.1.3 Asia-Pacific 4.1.4 Europe 4.1.5 South America 4.1.6 Middle East and Africa 4.1.7 United States 4.2 Global ERP Software Sales and Revenue by Regions 4.2.1 Global ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Market Share (%) by Regions (2012-2017) 4.2.2 Global ERP Software Revenue (Million USD) and Market Share (%) by Regions (2012-2017) 4.2.3 Global ERP Software Sales (K Units), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Unit) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.4 North America ERP Software Sales (K Units), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Unit) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.5 Europe ERP Software Sales (K Units), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Unit) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.6 Asia-Pacific ERP Software Sales (K Units), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Unit) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.7 South America ERP Software Sales (K Units), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Unit) and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 4.2.8 Middle East and Africa ERP Software Sales (K Units), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Unit) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.9 United States ERP Software Sales (K Units), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Unit) and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 5 Global ERP Software Market Competition by Players/Manufacturers 5.1 Global ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Market Share by Players (2012-2017) 5.2 Global ERP Software Revenue (Million USD) and Share by Players (2012-2017) 5.3 Global ERP Software Average Price (USD/Unit) by Players (2012-2017) 5.4 Players ERP Software Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area, Product Types 5.5 ERP Software Market Competitive Situation and Trends 5.5.1 ERP Software Market Concentration Rate 5.5.2 Global ERP Software Market Share (%) of Top 3 and Top 5 Players 5.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 6 United States ERP Software Market Competition by Players/Manufacturers 6.1 United States ERP Software Sales (K Units) and Market Share by Players (2012-2017) 6.2 United States ERP Software Revenue (Million USD) and Share by Players (2012-2017) 6.3 United States ERP Software Average Price (USD/Unit) by Players (2012-2017) 6.4 United States ERP Software Market Share (%) of Top 3 and Top 5 Players For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


The small, transparent marine organism, abundant along California's coast, spends its life colonizing submerged surfaces—boats, docks and even other animals. But the star ascidian or golden star tunicate, as B. schlosseri is commonly known, is more than just a humble hanger-on. As an invertebrate closely related to humans, it has characteristics that are about to make it the focus of a multicampus research project aimed at placing the University of California (UC) at the forefront of vascular mechanics and—by extension—cardiovascular disease, which is responsible for one in four deaths in the state. UC has awarded Megan Valentine, an associate professor in UCSB's Department of Mechanical Engineering, and partners at UCLA and UC Irvine with $300,000 for a pilot project that is part of the UC Multi-Campus Research Programs and Initiatives (MRPI). The awards provide two years of seed funding for collaborations that show promise in terms of launching pioneering cross-disciplinary research that strengthens UC's position as a leading public research university, supports innovative graduate student research, informs public policy and benefits California residents. "This is a really strong area for UC and something we have a lot of pride of ownership in, but the campuses could be better linked," Valentine said. "These interdisciplinary initiatives from the UC Office of the President play an important role in cultivating relationships within and across campuses. We're very grateful for this opportunity to leverage system-wide resources and expertise." Valentine, her key UCSB collaborator, Anthony De Tomaso, an associate professor in UCSB's Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, and colleagues at the two other UC campuses will focus their research on the star ascidia's vascular mechanics and mechanobiology. The latter is an emerging field of science focused on how physical forces and changes in the mechanical properties of cells and tissues contribute to development, cell differentiation, physiology and disease. The project focuses specifically on vascular mechanics, which—despite the invertebrate's close evolutionary relationship to humans—has not been studied previously in this context. "A lot of the discoveries we've made in terms of what proteins are important for vasculature in humans appear also to be relevant in this model," Valentine said. "It has completely untapped potential for discovery." "The biology of Botryllus is fascinating and allows novel approaches in a number of fields, from immunology to stem cell biology and regeneration," said De Tomasco, whose lab has studied the animal for HOW LONG. "However, this new project on vascular biology is potentially groundbreaking, as it joins the unique anatomy and accessibility of the blood vessels to powerful visualization techniques. That allows us to directly manipulate and characterize global responses at a resolution not available in other model organisms." The star ascidian has a simple but unique anatomy, with the vasculature located externally. When it is treated with a drug that disrupts collagen crosslinking—another of its valuable characteristics is that it responds to drugs that humans also respond to—it retracts the vascular structure in a process clearly visible through an optical microscope and even to the naked eye. "So we get this immediate visual readout from a live organism," Valentine explained. "We can go in and manipulate the vessels: stretch them or apply forces with the goal of understanding what's happening mechanically. The drug does not affect the blood vessels directly; it affects the matrix in which they sit, softening it. And when the vasculature receives that softening signal, it retracts. We want to dig into the details of how organisms sense force and how they receive and process mechanical signals and turn that information into other cell functions—that's not something that we understand. Then we need to connect that to the broader context of human vascular biology." The long-term goal is to use the project to establish an infrastructure and then to secure longer-term funding and form a consortium of biologists and engineers to investigate how blood vessels know when to grow and shrink and how to control those decisions to fight human diseases such as cardiovascular disease, macular degeneration and cancer. The project also seeks to understanding of the role of phagocytes, cells that protect an organism by ingesting harmful foreign entities, cells and tissues that are no longer needed. "In this case, as those vessels are retreating and you're losing all the blood vessel volume, those cells have to go somewhere, and phagocytes play a role in destroying them," Valentine explained. "There are a lot of open questions about exactly how that works. And because the vasculature is on the outside in this system, we have a lot of opportunities for imaging and for other analysis, so maybe we can get to the heart of that question." Student training is another key component of the MRPI Awards, and UCSB undergraduate and graduate students who are trained in engineering will have the opportunity to work with colleagues at UCI and UCLA who have expertise in such areas as conventional animal model studies, as well as conducting human clinical trials. Undergraduate students in a new class for summer 2017 will spend three weeks doing discovery-based research at UCSB and three weeks learning bioinformatics at UCLA. "The coolest thing about this system is that it is so accessible; you can touch the blood vessels with your fingers," De Tomaso said. "Because the retraction of the vasculature also occurs quickly—taking only 16 hours—students can rapidly learn many experimental processes. There is so much low-hanging fruit experimentally that they will actually be able to do brand-new science." MRPI projects build connections among UC campuses while taking advantage of specific characteristics unique to each one. "In Santa Barbara, because of our location, we understand ocean resources and what we can learn from studying ocean organisms," Valentine said. "It will be powerful if we can share our ocean experience with the other campuses that don't have those resources. In a 10 campus system, you don't need every campus to have expertise in every area. We should be specialized, but then we should also recognize that as part of the UC system, we can leverage all of the other campuses in really unique ways." Explore further: Regenerative stem cell active in human blood vessels could help patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

At first glance, Botryllus schlosseri is pretty nondescript. The small, transparent marine organism, abundant along California's coast, spends its life colonizing submerged surfaces -- boats, docks and even other animals. But the star ascidian or golden star tunicate, as B. schlosseri is commonly known, is more than just a humble hanger-on. As an invertebrate closely related to humans, it has characteristics that are about to make it the focus of a multicampus research project aimed at placing the University of California (UC) at the forefront of vascular mechanics and -- by extension -- cardiovascular disease, which is responsible for one in four deaths in the state. UC has awarded Megan Valentine, an associate professor in UCSB's Department of Mechanical Engineering, and partners at UCLA and UC Irvine with $300,000 for a pilot project that is part of the UC Multi-Campus Research Programs and Initiatives (MRPI). The awards provide two years of seed funding for collaborations that show promise in terms of launching pioneering cross-disciplinary research that strengthens UC's position as a leading public research university, supports innovative graduate student research, informs public policy and benefits California residents. "This is a really strong area for UC and something we have a lot of pride of ownership in, but the campuses could be better linked," Valentine said. "These interdisciplinary initiatives from the UC Office of the President play an important role in cultivating relationships within and across campuses. We're very grateful for this opportunity to leverage system-wide resources and expertise." Valentine, her key UCSB collaborator, Anthony De Tomaso, an associate professor in UCSB's Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, and colleagues at the two other UC campuses will focus their research on the star ascidia's vascular mechanics and mechanobiology. The latter is an emerging field of science focused on how physical forces and changes in the mechanical properties of cells and tissues contribute to development, cell differentiation, physiology and disease. The project focuses specifically on vascular mechanics, which -- despite the invertebrate's close evolutionary relationship to humans -- has not been studied previously in this context. "A lot of the discoveries we've made in terms of what proteins are important for vasculature in humans appear also to be relevant in this model," Valentine said. "It has completely untapped potential for discovery." "The biology of Botryllus is fascinating and allows novel approaches in a number of fields, from immunology to stem cell biology and regeneration," said De Tomasco, whose lab has studied the animal for HOW LONG. "However, this new project on vascular biology is potentially groundbreaking, as it joins the unique anatomy and accessibility of the blood vessels to powerful visualization techniques. That allows us to directly manipulate and characterize global responses at a resolution not available in other model organisms." The star ascidian has a simple but unique anatomy, with the vasculature located externally. When it is treated with a drug that disrupts collagen crosslinking -- another of its valuable characteristics is that it responds to drugs that humans also respond to -- it retracts the vascular structure in a process clearly visible through an optical microscope and even to the naked eye. "So we get this immediate visual readout from a live organism," Valentine explained. "We can go in and manipulate the vessels: stretch them or apply forces with the goal of understanding what's happening mechanically. The drug does not affect the blood vessels directly; it affects the matrix in which they sit, softening it. And when the vasculature receives that softening signal, it retracts. We want to dig into the details of how organisms sense force and how they receive and process mechanical signals and turn that information into other cell functions -- that's not something that we understand. Then we need to connect that to the broader context of human vascular biology." The long-term goal is to use the project to establish an infrastructure and then to secure longer-term funding and form a consortium of biologists and engineers to investigate how blood vessels know when to grow and shrink and how to control those decisions to fight human diseases such as cardiovascular disease, macular degeneration and cancer. The project also seeks to understanding of the role of phagocytes, cells that protect an organism by ingesting harmful foreign entities, cells and tissues that are no longer needed. "In this case, as those vessels are retreating and you're losing all the blood vessel volume, those cells have to go somewhere, and phagocytes play a role in destroying them," Valentine explained. "There are a lot of open questions about exactly how that works. And because the vasculature is on the outside in this system, we have a lot of opportunities for imaging and for other analysis, so maybe we can get to the heart of that question." Student training is another key component of the MRPI Awards, and UCSB undergraduate and graduate students who are trained in engineering will have the opportunity to work with colleagues at UCI and UCLA who have expertise in such areas as conventional animal model studies, as well as conducting human clinical trials. Undergraduate students in a new class for summer 2017 will spend three weeks doing discovery-based research at UCSB and three weeks learning bioinformatics at UCLA. "The coolest thing about this system is that it is so accessible; you can touch the blood vessels with your fingers," De Tomaso said. "Because the retraction of the vasculature also occurs quickly -- taking only 16 hours -- students can rapidly learn many experimental processes. There is so much low-hanging fruit experimentally that they will actually be able to do brand-new science." MRPI projects build connections among UC campuses while taking advantage of specific characteristics unique to each one. "In Santa Barbara, because of our location, we understand ocean resources and what we can learn from studying ocean organisms," Valentine said. "It will be powerful if we can share our ocean experience with the other campuses that don't have those resources. In a 10 campus system, you don't need every campus to have expertise in every area. We should be specialized, but then we should also recognize that as part of the UC system, we can leverage all of the other campuses in really unique ways."


— Orbis Research shared "2017-2022 Semiconductor Fabrication Software Report on Global and United States Market, Status and Forecast, by Players, Types and Applications" which Provides Key Mnaufacturers, Key Profiles, Strategies and Forecast Trends from 2017 to 2022 This report studies the Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market status and outlook of global and United States, from angles of players, regions, product types and end industries; this report analyzes the top players in global and United States market, and splits the Semiconductor Fabrication Software market by product type and applications/end industries. The global Semiconductor Fabrication Software market is valued at XX million USD in 2016 and is expected to reach XX million USD by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. The Asia-Pacific will occupy for more market share in following years, especially in China, also fast growing India and Southeast Asia regions. North America, especially The United States, will still play an important role which cannot be ignored. Any changes from United States might affect the development trend of Semiconductor Fabrication Software. United States plays an important role in global market, with market size of xx million USD in 2016 and will be xx million USD in 2022, with a CAGR of XX. Geographically, this report is segmented into several key regions, with sales, revenue, market share (%) and growth Rate (%) of Semiconductor Fabrication Software in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering: • United States • North America • Europe • Asia-Pacific • South America • Middle East and Africa The major players in global and United States Semiconductor Fabrication Software market, including : Applied Materials, PeerGroup, Comsol, Conventor, Cognex, Synopsys, JDA, Siemens, Lattice, NXP, Optimal. The On the basis of product, the Semiconductor Fabrication Software market is primarily split into : • Supply Planning • Process Optimization • Transportation Management Systems • Others On the basis on the end users/applications, this report covers : • Electronical Industry • Others Chapter One: Methodology and Data Source Chapter Two: Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market Overview Chapter Three: Semiconductor Fabrication Software Application/End Users Chapter Four: Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market Status and Outlook by Regions Chapter Five: Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market Competition by Players/Manufacturers Chapter Six: United States Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market Competition by Players/Manufacturers Chapter Seven: Semiconductor Fabrication Software Players/Manufacturers Profiles and Sales Data Chapter Eight: Semiconductor Fabrication Software Manufacturing Cost, Industrial Chain and Downstream Buyers Chapter Nine: Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors and Market Effect Factors Chapter Ten: Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market Forecast Chapter Eleven: Research Findings and Conclusion Table Research Programs/Design for This Report Figure Bottom-up and Top-down Approaches for This Report Figure Data Triangulation Table Key Data Information from Secondary Sources Table Key Data Information from Primary Sources Figure Semiconductor Fabrication Software Product Picture Figure Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Revenue (Million USD) Status and Outlook (2012-2022) Figure United States Semiconductor Fabrication Software Revenue (Million USD) Status and Outlook (2012-2022) Figure Product Picture of Supply Planning Table Major Players of Supply Planning Figure Global Supply Planning Sales (K Units) and Growth Rate (%) (2012-2017) Figure Product Picture of Process Optimization Table Major Players of Process Optimization Figure Global Process Optimization Sales (K Units) and Growth Rate (%) (2012-2017) Figure Product Picture of Transportation Management Systems Table Major Players of Transportation Management Systems Figure Global Transportation Management Systems Sales (K Units) and Growth Rate (%) (2012-2017) Table Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Sales (K Units) and Growth Rate (%) Comparison by Types (2012, 2016 and 2022) Table Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Sales (K Units) by Types (2012-2017) Table Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Sales Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) Figure Global Sales Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) Figure Global Sales Semiconductor Fabrication Software Market Share (%) by Types in 2016 Table Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Revenue (Million USD) by Types (2012-2017) Table Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Revenue Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) Figure Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Revenue Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) Figure 2016 Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Revenue Market Share (%) by Types Table Global Semiconductor Fabrication Software Price (USD/Unit) by Types (2012-2017) Table United States Semiconductor Fabrication Software Sales (K Units) and Growth Rate (%) Comparison by Types (2012, 2016 and 2022) …Continued About US: Orbis Research (our website: www.orbisresearch.com) is the most comprehensive database of market-related research. Serious researchers from across the globe seeking up-to-date information on the latest market trends with in-depth analyses turn to Orbis Research. Our massive database boasts authentic reports published by leading authors and publications. Orbis’ highly motivated and expert in-house team undertakes rigorous screening of the credentials of publishers and authors before accepting their submissions. Such vetting is imperative for internal quality control. For more information, please visit http://www.orbisresearch.com


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers have developed a new device to map the brain during surgery and distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues. The device provides higher resolution neural readings than existing tools used in the clinic and could enable doctors to perform safer, more precise brain surgeries. The device is an improved version of a clinical tool called an electrode grid, which is a plastic or silicone-based grid of electrodes that is placed directly on the surface of the brain during surgery to monitor the activity of large groups of neurons. Neurosurgeons use electrode grids to identify which areas of the brain are diseased in order to avoid damaging or removing healthy, functional tissue during operations. Despite their wide use, electrode grids have remained bulky and have not experienced any major advances over the last 20 years. The new electrode grid, developed by a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego and Massachusetts General Hospital, is about a thousand times thinner -- 6 micrometers versus several millimeters thick -- than clinical electrode grids. This allows it to conform better to the intricately curved surface of the brain and obtain better readings. The new electrode grid also contains a much higher density of electrodes -- spaced 25 times closer than those in clinical electrode grids -- enabling it to generate higher resolution recordings. "Our goal is to develop a tool that can obtain more reliable information from the surface of the brain," said electrical engineering professor Shadi Dayeh, who co-led the study with neuroscience professor Eric Halgren and electrical engineering professor Vikash Gilja, all at UC San Diego. The project was funded by the Center for Brain Activity Mapping (CBAM) at UC San Diego and brought together experts from multiple fields, including neurosurgeons, neuroscientists, electrical engineers, materials scientists and experts in systems integration. Researchers published their work on May 12 in Advanced Functional Materials. "By providing higher resolution views of the human brain, this technology can improve clinical practices and could lead to high performance brain machine interfaces," Gilja said. To make their high resolution electrode grid, researchers had to find a way to shrink the size of the electrodes to pack them closer together. But with metal electrodes, which are typically used to make these grids, there is a tradeoff -- shrinking their size increases their electrical resistance, resulting in more noisy readings. To overcome this problem, the team switched out the metal electrodes with ones made of a conductive polymer called PEDOT:PSS. The material is transparent, thin and flexible. Using this material enabled researchers to make smaller electrodes without sacrificing electrochemical performance. It also enhanced the richness of the information measured from the surface of the brain. "These electrodes occupy minuscule volumes -- imagine Saran wrap, but thinner. And we demonstrate that they can capture neural activity from the human brain at least as well as conventional electrodes that are orders of magnitude larger," Gilja said. Researchers worked with neurosurgeons at Thornton Hospital at UC San Diego and Brigham Women's Hospital in Boston to test their grid on four patients. The PEDOT:PSS electrode grid and a standard clinical electrode grid were compared side by side. In standard clinical recordings, the PEDOT:PSS electrode grid either performed similarly or slightly better than the standard electrode grid, recording with lower noise and higher resolution. "In order to introduce a new electrode grid for clinical use, we first need to show that the device can yield the same information as that used in the clinic. Then we can build upon that work to make an even better product that can improve patient care," Dayeh said. In one test, the team performed background readings of a patient's brain waves both while the patient was awake and unconscious. The PEDOT:PSS electrode grid produced similar readings as the standard clinical electrode grid. In another test, the team monitored the brain activity of a patient undergoing epilepsy surgery. Both electrode grids identified normal functioning areas of the brain versus where the seizures were happening. The main difference is that the PEDOT:PSS electrode grid produced more detailed and higher resolution readings than the clinical electrode grid. Other tests monitored the brain activity of patients performing cognitive tasks. Patients were either shown a particular word or a picture illustrating that word. The word was afterwards recited to the patients. In the readings from both the PEDOT:PSS and standard electrode grids, researchers could differentiate between when the patients were hearing the word versus when they were seeing it (or a picture). "This experiment shows we can resolve functional and cognitive activity from the surface of the brain using these electrodes," Dayeh said. The team's next steps are to make higher density electrode grids for improved resolution and biocompatibility tests to see how long they can stay in the body before they experience biofouling. Paper title: "Development and Translation of PEDOT:PSS Microelectrodes for Intraoperative Monitoring," by Mehran Ganji*, Erik Kaestner*, John Hermiz*, Nick Rogers, Atsunori Tanaka, Daniel Cleary, Sang Heon Lee, Joseph Snider, Bob S. Carter, David Barba, Vikash Gilja, Eric Halgren and Shadi A. Dayeh at UC San Diego; Milan Halgren at Massachusetts General Hospital; Garth Rees Cosgrove and Sydney S. Cash at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; and Ilke Uguz and George G. Malliaras at CMP-EMSE, Gardanne, France. *These authors contributed equally to this work. This work was supported by the Center for Brain Activity Mapping (CBAM) at UC San Diego. The authors acknowledge faculty start-up support from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC San Diego. Partial support is also acknowledged from the National Science Foundation (grant no. ECCS-1351980), the University of California Multicampus Research Programs and Initiatives (UC MRPI, grant no. MR-15-328909), and the Office of Naval Research (grant no. N00014-13-1-0672). This work was performed in part at UC San Diego's Nano3 nanofabrication cleanroom facility, part of the San Diego Nanotechnology Infrastructure, a member of the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure, which is supported by the National Science Foundation.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WATERTOWN, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--FORMA Therapeutics, a clinical-stage and fully integrated discovery and development company, announced today it has been awarded a research grant from The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (“MJFF”) to further develop FORMA’s discovery program in protein homeostasis and ubiquitination for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). FORMA has established a research alliance with Professors Michael Clague and Sylvie Urbé from University of Liverpool, UK, and Dr. David Komander from Medical Research Council, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK, who will work alongside FORMA’s lead investigator, Dr. Stephanos Ioannidis, to advance the research plan subject to this prestigious award. Protein homeostasis and mitochondrial function are areas of biology that harbor promising new therapeutic targets for the treatment of PD. Recent research suggests that members of the deubiquitinase (DUB) family of proteins, which are critical in protein homeostasis, are also key modulators of mitophagy or mitochondrial clearance. The elimination of abnormal mitochondria by targeting DUB activity may be a route to intervene in the pathogenesis of PD. The grant from MJFF supports the advanced discovery and development of preclinical compounds targeting DUBs potentially relevant to PD. Shalini Padmanabhan, Ph.D., Associate Director of Research Programs at MJFF, said, “While accumulating evidence implicate defective mitochondria in PD pathology, exactly how DUBs regulate mitophagy is unclear. We hope this award will enable FORMA and its neurodegenerative disease alliance with leading investigators to understand the role of DUBs in clearance of damaged mitochondria and potentially lead to a promising treatment approach for PD patients.” “We are honored to receive recognition from MJFF for our research in protein homeostasis and to collaborate with its network in PD. This award provides support to further enable innovative research with our talented collaborators in the UK,” said John Hohneker, M.D., EVP and Head of Research and Development at FORMA. “We hope to gain a deeper understanding of the role of DUBs in PD that will ultimately facilitate the advancement of new therapies for patients.” As the world’s largest nonprofit funder of Parkinson’s research, The Michael J. Fox Foundation is dedicated to accelerating a cure for Parkinson’s disease and improved therapies for those living with the condition today. The Foundation pursues its goals through an aggressively funded, highly targeted research program coupled with active global engagement of scientists, Parkinson’s patients, business leaders, clinical trial participants, donors and volunteers. In addition to funding more than $650 million in research to date, the Foundation has fundamentally altered the trajectory of progress toward a cure. Operating at the hub of worldwide Parkinson’s research, the Foundation forges groundbreaking collaborations with industry leaders, academic scientists and government research funders; increases the flow of participants into Parkinson’s disease clinical trials with its online tool, Fox Trial Finder; promotes Parkinson’s awareness through high-profile advocacy, events and outreach; and coordinates the grassroots involvement of thousands of Team Fox members around the world. FORMA Therapeutics' scientists are passionate about discovering and developing medicines that will make a difference in oncology, inflammation & immunity, and other serious diseases. The Company’s fully integrated R&D team drives discovery and early clinical development of therapeutics for qualified targets in the areas of epigenetics, protein homeostasis and metabolism. Leveraging a world class network of academic investigators, clinical experts and partners, FORMA combines deep biology insight, chemistry expertise and early clinical development capabilities, to create drug candidates that will ultimately provide profound patient benefit. FORMA is headquartered in Watertown, MA near the epicenter of the Cambridge Life Sciences cluster, with additional chemistry operations in Branford, CT. www.formatherapeutics.com


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— In this report, chloroform market value is provided for 2016 in USD millions along with an expected CAGR % as well as USD million value of CAS 67-66-3 industry in 2022. Regionally, the globe is segmented into North America, Europe, Japan, China, India and Southeast Asia to study their market size and regional analysis. 3 end user applications of chloroform market covering solvents & reagents, anesthetic and criminal use are studied in this research. Share of chloroform market is covered by applications as well supported with potential applications in the future. This comprehensive research offers insights into how chloroform market gained its standing, globally. Reliable, verified and cross-referenced (wherever feasible) data help understand the Chloroform industry analysis in a better way to take business decisions. Add to this secondary research, primary interviews with selected participants (spread across - but not all inclusive for each report - executives at C-level, analysts and experts of niche markets + trends + trade, consultants, etc of Chloroform market add professional and in-depth market research value to this study. The “Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Market Research Report 2017” is spread across 100 pages, supported with 125 data tables, charts and figures is now available with eMarketOrg.com at http://emarketorg.com/pro/global-chloroform-cas-67-66-3-market-research-report-2017/ . The team working on this report also ensured covering a bird's view for readers taking into account details that help identify and understand technology strengths, opportunities, weaknesses, and threats of the Chloroform market. Factors (vary from report to report) including classifications, applications, production information, technical data on revenue and analysis of consumption, revenue, supply, import-export and much more are covered as a part of this overview. These numbers when brought together with insights on leading companies and manufacturers active in Chloroform market for their products, company profiles, business and contact information make this research a one-of-its-kind read. With status of the market covered, this report then moves towards sharing forecasts for next few year covering development trends and analysis of Chloroform. The conclusion of the research aims to close the Chloroform market study with an objective to help its readers take concrete business decisions. Companies like Tokuyama Group, Productos Aditivos, BASF, Solvay, Dow Chemical Company, Arihant Chemicals, Ineos, Shin-Etsu Chemical and Akzonobel are profiled in this study. Get your questions on this report answered, before taking a purchase decision, via http://emarketorg.com/inquire-before-buying/?product-id=86710 . A partial list of data tables and figures provided for chloroform market in this research include: Table Raw Materials Sources of Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Major Manufacturers in 2016 Table Major Buyers of Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Table Distributors/Traders List Figure Global Chloroform Market (CAS 67-66-3) Capacity, Production and Growth Rate Forecast (2017-2022) Figure Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Revenue and Growth Rate Forecast (2017-2022) Figure Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Price and Trend Forecast (2017-2022) Table Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Production Forecast by Region (2017-2022) Figure Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Production Market Share Forecast by Region (2017-2022) Table Global Chloroform Market (CAS 67-66-3) Consumption Forecast by Region (2017-2022) Figure Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Consumption Market Share Forecast by Region (2017-2022) Table Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Production Forecast by Type (2017-2022) Figure Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Production Forecast by Type (2017-2022) Table Global Chloroform Market (CAS 67-66-3) Revenue Forecast by Type (2017-2022) Figure Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Revenue Market Share Forecast by Type (2017-2022) Table Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Price Forecast by Type (2017-2022) Table Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Consumption Forecast by Application (2017-2022) Figure Global Chloroform (CAS 67-66-3) Consumption Forecast by Application (2017-2022) Table Research Programs/Design for This Report Figure Bottom-up and Top-down Approaches for This Report Figure Data Triangulation Table Key Data Information from Secondary Sources Table Key Data Information from Primary Source Explore more reports on materials and chemicals markets at http://emarketorg.com/cat/materials-and-chemicals/page/3/ . About Us: eMarketOrg.com aims to provide businesses and organizations market intelligence products and services that help in making smart, instant and crucial decisions. Our database offers access to insights from industry leaders, experts and influencers on global and regional sectors, market trends, user behaviour, for companies as well as products. With data and information from reputable and trusted private and public sources, our clients are never short of statistics and analysis that are up to date. Connect With Us: Market Research Blog: http://emarketorg.com/blog/ News on current market trends and more: http://emarketorg.com/news1/ Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/emarketorg Follow us on G+ https://plus.google.com/collection/w7ioaB For more information, please visit http://emarketorg.com/pro/global-chloroform-cas-67-66-3-market-research-report-2017/


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Conference Forum has announced the launch of the 2nd annual Clinical Trial Collaborations (CTC) conference in Boston on April 3-4, 2017. Led by Co-Chair Katherine Vandebelt, Global Head of Clinical Innovation at Eli Lilly, the CTC conference is the only strategic-level event in the US entirely focused on collaborations needed for 21st century drug development. Valerie Bowling, Executive Director of the CTC event, said, “The future of collaborations in drug development will require partners we never thought of before and new models for outstanding project delivery.” The CTC conference offers a variety of sessions that illustrate new collaboration techniques to drive improved clinical trial outcomes and bring clinical trial professionals closer to patients. Ken Getz, Director of Sponsored Research Programs at Tufts CSDD, will kick off the event with a presentation titled, “How the Clinical Collaborations Landscape Is Changing and Its Impact on R&D Operations.” The CTC conference also will feature three first-time keynote presentations: Takeda on their Transformational Clinical Development and Marketed Product Partnership with PRA Health Sciences with Dr Andy Plump, Director, Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, Takeda Models for Exquisite Project Delivery with Internal and External Partners with Dr Andy Lee, Senior Vice President, Head of Global Clinical Trial Operations, Merck In addition, the CTC conference will feature: The CTC conference offers presentations that deliver insightful clinical trial ideas and challenges for R&D operations, contract resource organizations (CROs) and site executives. It serves as an ideal event for senior-level clinical operation executives from large, medium and small pharmas, CROs, sites and patient advocacy organizations. The CTC event is proud to have CenterWatch as its exclusive lead media partner. CenterWatch is the leading source of clinical trial information for both clinical research professionals and patients. Learn more about CenterWatch. To find more about the CTC conference, click here. About The Conference Forum The Conference Forum is a drug development industry research firm and presents specialized events for professionals in the life science and healthcare industries. The company currently offer conferences for R&D leaders, clinical development professionals, biotech executives, VCs, drug delivery specialists, patient advocates and FDA executives. The Conference Forum’s mission is to create the best content, exchange ideas and provide quality networking to help move therapeutics to patients faster. Learn more about The Conference Forum.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: astrobiology.com

Photosynthesis, creating oxygen and carbohydrates such as glucose from solar energy, water, and CO2, is indispensable for many species on this planet. However, it is unclear exactly how or when organisms evolved the ability to photosynthesize. These questions have fascinated scientists for a long time. A Japanese research group led by Associate Professor ASHIDA Hiroki (Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University), Academic Researcher KONO Takunari (Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University), and Professor MATSUMURA Hiroyoshi (Ritsumeikan University) has discovered an evolutionary model for the biological function that creates CO2 from glucose in photosynthesis. They found the mechanism in a primitive, non-photosynthesizing microbe. The research group discovered that Methanospirillum hungatei, a microbe (methanogenic archaeon) which is thought to have existed since before the development of photosynthesis, possess genes similar to those that play a role in photosynthesis. Through analysis of the enzymes synthesized by these genes and by investigating the metabolic substances within the organism, carrying out metabolome analysis to locate the trapped CO2, the team proved that Methanospirillum hungatei uses a primitive pathway that closely resembles the metabolic pathway used in photosynthesis to synthesize carbohydrates such as glucose. By clarifying part of the primitive metabolic pathway for photosynthesis, these findings could help to reveal how the photosynthesis system formed during evolution, a mystery that scientists have so far been unable to solve. If further light can be shed on the evolution of photosynthesis, scientists could potentially utilize this information to use and improve upon photosynthetic functions in order to increase production of crops and biofuel. This research was carried out as part of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Strategic Basic Research Programs. It was a joint project by Kobe University, Ritsumeikan University, the Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Birla Institute of Technology and Science (India), Osaka University and Shizuoka University. The findings were published on January 13 in the online journal Nature Communications. Please click here for further details: http://www.kobe-u.ac.jp/documents/en/NEWS/research/2017_01_31_01-01.pdf


A National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) research team led by senior researcher Nobuyuki Ishida and postdoctoral researcher Hideki Masuda, Surface Characterization Group, Research Center for Advanced Measurement and Characterization (Ishida is also a GREEN leader in the Nano Interface Characterization Group), succeeded in visualizing the nanoscale change in potential distribution in composite cathode materials of solid state lithium ion batteries (SS-LIBs) before and after charging/discharging the batteries. The results from this study may contribute to identifying the cause of high resistivity at the electrode–electrolyte interfaces, which has been hindering the development of high power density SS-LIBs. Due to their proven safety and excellent cycle characteristics, SS-LIBs are envisioned as promising next-generation storage batteries. However, because of the higher transfer resistance of lithium ions at the electrode–solid electrolyte interfaces compared to that at the electrode–liquid electrolyte interfaces, it is difficult to increase the power density of SS-LIBs. To understand the origin of interfacial resistivity, modeling was applied to the lithium ion depleted layer (space-charge layer), which forms in solid electrolytes when SS-LIBs are being charged, and to defects at the interfacial layer. To test these hypotheses, it is critical to measure the change in thickness of the space-charge layer, and the change in the distribution of lithium ion concentrations in that layer before and after charging/discharging the batteries. Then, it will be feasible to analyze the correlation between these measurements and interfacial resistivity. However, it had been difficult to measure electrical potential distribution in SS-LIB samples as the samples need to be extracted without compromising the performance of the battery. This had been a major issue preventing researchers from investigating the cause of interfacial resistivity. The research team developed a method whereby samples to be measured are cut out from SS-LIBs, the cross-section of the samples is treated, and potential distribution is measured using a scanning probe microscope, all of which are performed under an inert gas atmosphere or in vacuum. Then the team successfully visualized change in potential distribution arising from battery charging/discharging in the composite cathode at the high spatial resolution (≤50 nm) while keeping the battery performance. When SS-LIBs (provided by Taiyo Yuden Co., Ltd.) were evaluated using this method, the results indicated that the area where lithium ion concentrations decreased in the order of micrometers expanded in the solid electrolyte region, and that charging states were locally inhomogeneous. This method is applicable to the evaluation of space-charge layers in many types of SS-LIBs, and may contribute to understanding the causes of high interfacial resistivity in SS-LIBs. In addition, this method is also applicable to the evaluation of differences in charging/discharging states for individual active material particles that arise due to non-uniform electrical conductivity distribution in the composite electrode materials. Therefore, the new method may not only contribute to the design of interfaces to improve the performance of SS-LIBs but also apply to various battery analysis techniques including the analysis of causes of battery degradation. A part of this study was conducted in conjunction with the project titled "Formation of super-ion conduction path in all-solid-state lithium ion rechargeable battery through design of the crystal phase-interface with hierarchically controlled structures" (Katsuya Teshima, research director), which was carried out to supplement the project "Creation of innovative functional materials with advanced properties by hyper-nano-space design" (Tohru Setoyama, research supervisor), under the Strategic Basic Research Programs (specifically the CREST program) sponsored by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). Explore further: Researchers find ultra-thin solution to primary obstacle in solid-state battery development More information: Hideki Masuda et al. Internal potential mapping of charged solid-state-lithium ion batteries using in situ Kelvin probe force microscopy, Nanoscale (2017). DOI: 10.1039/C6NR07971G

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