Sports Performance Optimization Research Laboratory

Tunis, Tunisia

Sports Performance Optimization Research Laboratory

Tunis, Tunisia
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Slimani M.,Sports Performance Optimization Research Laboratory | Chaabene H.,Sports Performance Optimization Research Laboratory | Miarka B.,Federal University of Pelotas | Chamari K.,Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance | Year: 2017

Purpose: To determine the performance aspects (time-motion and technical-tactical analysis) of top-level low-kick kickboxers according to gender, weight category, combat round, and match outcome. Methods: Seventy-two kickboxers (44 male, 28 female) were studied. Thirty-six bouts (male = 61, female = 41 rounds) were analyzed using a time-motion system. Time structure was classifed into 3 phases: preparatory-activity time (PT), fghting time (FT), and stoppage time (ST). Results: Referee decisions caused an overall effort:pause ratio (E:P) of ~1:1.5, with a signifcant difference between weight categories (light and middleweights = 1:1.5, heavyweight = 1:1). This ratio was ~1:6 when high-intensity actions-to-pause activities were considered. Signifcant differences were also observed between rounds (all P <.001), with 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-round E:Ps of 1:1, 1:1.5, and ~1:2, respectively. The relative times of FT and PT, total attacking actions, upper-limb actions, number of technical actions performed on the head, and the number of high-intensity actions were higher in males than females (all P =.05). Males performed more jab-cross actions and fewer low kicks than females (P <.001). Males used upper-limb (63.4%) more than lower-limb techniques (36.6%), targeting the head (56.9%) more than the body/leg (43.1%), with no signifcant difference from females (P >.05). E:P was similar between winners and losers. However, the numbers of technical actions performed on the head, counterattack actions, jab-cross technique, and total punches were higher in winners than losers (all P <.05). Conclusion: Training programs need to be adapted to the specifc requirements of kickboxers' weight categories and gender to develop the technical-tactical abilities that improve athletes' chances of winning. © 2017 Human Kinetics, Inc.

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