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Joseph Paton, group leader at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in Lisbon, Portugal, is among the awardees announced today, May 9th, 2017, by the International Research Scholars Program. Paton is one of 41 outstanding investigators chosen from 1500 submitted applications. Paton's work has contributed great insight into the mechanisms by which the brain creates mental connections between events separated in time, an ability crucial for vital cognitive functions such as learning and planning. Specifically, together with his team, Paton demonstrated how time is encoded in neural circuits in the brain (Current Biology article, eLife article) and identified a set of neurons that control subjective time perception in rodents (Science article). This grant will allow Paton to further dissect the mechanisms by which internally generated signals, such as the ones that inform the brain about the passage of time, are transformed into action. According to Paton, a deeper understanding of this process is "key for discovering how animals free themselves from the immediacy of the current moment to be able to interact with the world in a more informed and calculated manner." The International Research Scholars Program is funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Calouste de Gulbenkian Foundation. The programme provides its awardees with a total sum of $650,000 to support their research over a period of five years.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Forty-one scientists from 16 countries have been chosen as International Research Scholars, exceptional early-career scientists poised to advance biomedical research across the globe. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has teamed up with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation to develop scientific talent around the world, and will award a total of nearly $26.7 million to this group of scholars. Each researcher will receive a total of $650,000 over five years. The award is a big boon for scientists early in their careers, and offers the freedom to pursue new research directions and creative projects that could develop into top-notch scientific programs. "This is an outstanding group of scientists who will push biomedical research forward worldwide, and we are thrilled to support them alongside our philanthropic partners," said David Clapham, HHMI's Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer. The scientists selected as International Research Scholars represent a diverse array of scientific disciplines and geographic locations. Scholars hail from research organizations and institutions from across the world, from Tanzania to Cambodia to Chile to Austria. Their research covers a broad variety of biological and medical research areas too, including neuroscience, genetics, biophysics, computational biology, and parasitology. "We are excited to join with our partners in supporting these superb scientists. We look to them to bring transformative innovation to priority global health problems," said Chris Karp, Director of Global Health Discovery & Translational Sciences at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. These researchers' goals are innovative, wide-ranging, and forward-thinking. They seek to understand diverse topics, from how immune cells function to how pathogenic bacteria jump from the environment to humans, and are even investigating ways to watch genes switch on and off in living brains. "We are delighted to be a partner in supporting this outstanding community of international researchers. Their expertise and thirst for knowledge will enhance our understanding of how life works and the causes and consequences of disease, said Anne-Marie Coriat, Head of Research Careers at Wellcome Trust. A panel of distinguished scientists reviewed more than 1,400 applications, and evaluated both the impact of past work, including doctoral and postdoctoral achievements, and the promise of work to come. It's a researcher-focused approach that emphasizes the skills and talents of the individual, rather than solely the projects proposed. "We are proud to partner with HHMI, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Wellcome Trust to support this truly exceptional group of young biomedical scientists. Biomedical research is increasingly at the core of the work of our research institute, the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência," said Gulbenkian Institute Director Jonathan Howard. HHMI, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation announced the 2017 International Research Scholar competition March 29, 2016. The competition was open to early-career scientists who held a full-time position at a research-oriented university, medical school, or nonprofit institution, and had been running their own labs for less than seven years. Candidates also had to work in an eligible country, and have received training in the United States or the United Kingdom for at least one year. Ido Amit wants to reveal how immune cells work, and what role they play in health and disease. His lab develops new single cell genomic technologies to study these cells in unprecedented resolution. Figuring out immune cells' actions will help advance the next generation of immunotherapy to fight cancer and other disorders. Melanie Blokesch studies Vibrio cholerae, a water-dwelling bacterium that wreaks havoc in the gut and causes the diarrheal disease cholera. Her team wants to map the molecular tools V. cholerae uses to jump from the environment to humans, which will help explain what triggers cholera outbreaks in endemic areas of the world. Carlos Blondel investigates the emergence of human pathogens by studying their molecular weaponry. He has worked with foodborne pathogens that cause gastrointestinal disease, such as Salmonella and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Blondel recently used CRISPR/Cas 9 genome editing technology to uncover key interactions between V. parahaemolyticus and human cells. Yossi Buganim's goal is to bring therapeutic cells from the lab to the clinic. His team has invented and improved ways to reprogram adult cells into other cell types, including those able to generate nearly any kind of cell in the body. One day, such cells could be tapped for regenerative medicine replacing damaged tissues with those grown in the lab. Tineke Cantaert seeks to understand how the immune system responds to infection by flaviviruses such as Dengue and Zika. Currently, no treatment exists for infection by either virus. Identifying biomarkers for protective immunity might help scientists speed up the development of therapies and vaccines. Ling-Ling Chen is discovering new and unusual classes of RNA molecules called long noncoding RNAs. She's figuring out how these molecules form, what role they play in gene regulation, and how they may influence disease. She has found that some of these RNAs are conspicuously absent in people with the neurodevelopmental genetic disorder Prader-Willi syndrome. Mark Dawson is searching for ways to wipe out malignant stem cells without harming normal stem cells. He studies cancers such as acute myeloid leukemia, which are difficult to eradicate using traditional chemotherapies. Understanding how normal and malignant stem cells differ from each other could let researchers devise more effective, targeted treatments. Ana Domingos is investigating new molecular strategies to fight obesity. She has discovered a direct link between fat tissue and neurons of the sympathetic nervous system, which plays a role in burning fat. Stimulating these neurons could one day lead to a new treatment to cause fat loss. Idan Efroni is unraveling the mystery of plants' impressive regenerative abilities. He uses tomatoes to study how plants generate new stem cells and meristems to replace damaged or missing roots. Insight into this process might reveal clues about tissue regeneration in other organisms, and help scientists boost plant production for agriculture. Eran Elinav is fascinated by microbes that live around and in our body our microbiome. He has discovered important links between nutrition, gut microbes and the risk of developing common diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Now, he wants to figure out how gut microbes impact human relapsing (or "yo-yo") obesity and its many complications. Qiaomei Fu is exploring the genetic roots of humankind. Her work has helped untangle the early history of modern humans and Neanderthals, and reveal how early agriculture affected European farmers. She wants to illuminate the human prehistory of Asia by investigating the ancient genomes of both humans and pathogens. Lena Ho is on the hunt for new peptides linked to human disease. She's looking for hidden gems among previously overlooked regions of our genome, and seeks to understand how the peptides work and how they can be used to combat common diseases of the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Kathryn Holt uses genomic tools to study infectious disease-causing microbes important in global health, including Salmonella typhi, which causes typhoid fever, and Shigella sonnei, a bacterium responsible for dysentery. She wants to understand what makes pathogens emerge, and why some become resistant to antimicrobial drugs. In developing animal embryos, stem cell growth is tightly regulated so that the right kinds of cells emerge at the proper place and time. Catarina Homem is investigating how metabolism and nutrition influence this process, and how mistakes can lead to developmental defects and diseases such as cancer. Michael Hothorn is piecing together how plants sense essential nutrients in the soil and send signals from cell to cell. A molecular understanding of how plants detect and respond to changes in phosphorus levels, for example, could help researchers engineer crops that can survive when nutrients are scarce. Shalev Itzkovitz studies the design principles of mammalian tissues. He's taking a close-up look at individual cells to figure out how they work together in organs such as the intestine, liver, and pancreas. Advanced imaging techniques combined with single cell sequencing will help researchers determine the job description of cells in different organs. Martin Jinek is investigating how protein and RNA molecules team up to control gene expression and protect the genome. He has pioneered work on the powerful genome-editing system known as CRISPR-Cas9, and revealed key details of this system at the atomic level. His work could spur the development of new, cutting-edge technologies for editing genomes and genetic therapies. Luis Larrondo is unwinding the secrets of biological clocks, which help living organisms, including humans, plants and fungi, stay in sync with the Earth's daily rhythms. His research draws upon synthetic biology as well as optogenetics to probe the molecular components that keep biological clocks ticking. Human genomic DNA is packaged with histone proteins into tightly-wound bundles of fiber called chromatin. Guohong Li has used an imaging technique called cryo-electron microscopy to visualize these twisted fibers in 3D at a detail previously unseen. Now, he wants to view the fibers at atomic resolution, and figure out the role of the histones wrapped inside. A suite of chemical tags decorates the genomes of humans, plants, and other multicellular organisms. Ryan Lister is inventing new tools to edit these tags, a type of epigenetic modification, which can regulate gene expression, cell differentiation, and more. He also wants to explore their role in brain development, which could offer new insights into neurological disorders. Mitochondria, which generate energy for cells and regulate programmed cell death, are vulnerable to damage. Ying Liu is using worm genetics and biochemistry to investigate the cellular pathways that sense mitochondrial dysfunction and activate stress responses. Defects in these pathways may contribute to metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Laura Mackay is working to identify pathways that guide the development of tissue-resident memory T cells, immune cells that reside in the body's peripheral tissues and protect against local infections. She wants to harness these cells to create new therapies for infectious disease, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Judit Makara is investigating how neurons in the brain's hippocampus support creation of memories. She is interested in the synaptic and dendritic processing mechanisms that promote the recruitment of individual neurons into ensembles with coordinated activity to store information about places or events. Tomas Marques-Bonet is assessing genomic diversity among great apes. His work will help us understand the biological processes and features that make us human and has implications for conservation biology. He is also using comparative genomics to study changes in gene regulation and the genomic consequences of domestication. Seth Masters uses personalized medicine to identify genetic changes that cause severe inflammatory diseases early in life. These studies teach us about how the innate immune system works, and may also provide targets for the development of drugs to treat more common inflammatory conditions such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, type 2 diabetes and neurological disorders. Ruben Moreno-Bote is interested in the idea that although the human brain can solve complex problems, it sometimes falls short on simple tasks. He is combining theoretical and experimental approaches to identify the factors that limit the amount of information stored in the brain. As stem cells develop into specialized cells, their cell fates are influenced by the biochemical pathways that process nutrients to synthesize cellular materials and convert food to energy. Shyh-Chang Ng is studying how these metabolic processes regulate muscle regeneration during aging. His work could deepen our understanding of the effects of nutrition and exercise, and suggest strategies for treating the aging-induced metabolic syndrome. Zaza Ndhlovu is investigating how the immune system is affected when patients with HIV begin combination antiretroviral therapy very early in the course of disease. His goal is to learn whether brief exposure to the virus is sufficient to prime a protective immune response that might one day be boosted by a vaccine. Fredros Okumu is developing species-specific methods of eliminating the malaria-transmitting mosquito Anopheles funestus, with the goal of stopping the disease's transmission in two districts in southeastern Tanzania. Although A. funestus is not the most populous mosquito species in the region, it is responsible for 82-95 percent of local malaria infections. Cellular perturbations, such as changes in nutrient or oxygen levels or accumulation of misfolded proteins, can be indicative of pathogen presence or disruption in normal physiology. Fabiola Osorio studies how the immune system recognizes and responds to signs of cellular stress for regulation of immunity. Biophysicist Hye Yoon Park is developing imaging technologies to visualize the cellular and molecular processes the brain uses to form, consolidate, and retrieve memories. She will use the new techniques to study how neuronal activity alters gene expression to rewire neural circuits during learning. Joseph Paton has discovered key signals in the brain involved in timing and decision-making. He is investigating the circuit mechanisms that generate these signals and transform them into actions. His work will help explain how animals free themselves from the immediacy of the current moment to learn and plan. Nicolas Plachta is using single-cell imaging technologies devised in his lab to study how developing embryos take shape. He wants to understand the molecular mechanisms that govern changes in cell fate, shape, and position and how these changes are coordinated across an entire embryo. Thomas Pucadyil is studying how biological membranes -- protective barriers that are highly resilient to rupture -- split apart to allow for the packaging and transport of cellular materials. He is searching for membrane fission catalysts that cells use to manage this energetically demanding process. Hai Qi is exploring how the immune system generates and maintains memory cells that remember past infections and stay poised to produce antibodies against returning pathogens. His research may open new avenues for vaccine development and suggest better ways to control autoimmune diseases. Asya Rolls wants to understand the connections between the brain and the immune system. She is particularly interested in how brain activity influences the immune system's ability to find and destroy tumors. Her research could reveal new ways to harness the body's inherent disease-fighting potential. Marvin Tanenbaum is developing an imaging approach that will allow researchers to observe individual messenger RNA molecules as they are translated into proteins in living cells. He will use the method to investigate how translation is regulated to control the fate and function of cells. Wai-Hong Tham is studying how malaria parasites interact with their human hosts. Specifically, she wants to understand how Plasmodium vivax, the dominant malaria parasite in countries outside of sub-Saharan Africa, recognizes and invades red blood cells inside the human body. Yanli Wang is studying mechanisms of two bacterial anti-virus defense systems. She is using structural biology to learn how the CRISPR-Cas and Argonaute systems use small molecules of RNA or DNA to find and cleave foreign genetic material. She is also looking for ways to modify their RNA/DNA-cleaving components to increase their efficiency as genome editing tools. Immediately after an egg is fertilized, DNA and its packaging proteins (histones) undergo drastic reorganization so that cells can acquire new identities in early embryos. However, how this is achieved remains poorly understood due to the extremely scarce experimental samples. By developing ultrasensitive tools for chromatin analysis, Wei Xie is working to decipher how such reprogramming occurs and whether chromatin associated "epigenetic" information can be passed on to the next generation. Manuel Zimmer is using the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans to study the dynamics of neural networks. Using a whole-brain imaging approach developed in his lab, he aims to uncover the fundamental computations and their underlying mechanisms neural circuits use to interpret sensory information and generate appropriate behaviors. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute plays a powerful role in advancing scientific research and education. Its scientists, located across the country and around the world, have made important discoveries that advance both human health and our fundamental understanding of biology. The Institute also aims to transform science education into a creative, interdisciplinary endeavor that reflects the excitement of real research. HHMI is headquartered in Chevy Chase, Maryland. http://www. Guided by the belief that every life has equal value, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation works to help all people lead healthy, productive lives. In developing countries, it focuses on improving people's health and giving them the chance to lift themselves out of hunger and extreme poverty. In the United States, it seeks to ensure that all people - especially those with the fewest resources - have access to the opportunities they need to succeed in school and life. Based in Seattle, Washington, the foundation is led by CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann and Co-chair William H. Gates Sr., under the direction of Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett. http://www. The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable foundation dedicated to improving health. We support bright minds in science, the humanities and the social sciences, as well as education, public engagement and the application of research to medicine. Our investment portfolio gives us the independence to support such transformative work as the sequencing and understanding of the human genome, research that established front-line drugs for malaria, and Wellcome Collection, our free venue for the incurably curious that explores medicine, life and art. http://www. The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation is an international foundation that bears the name of businessman, art collector and philanthropist of Armenian origin, Calouste Sarkis Gulbenkian (1869-1955). For almost 60 years, the Foundation has been carrying out extensive activities both in Portugal and abroad through the development of in-house projects -- or in partnership with other institutions -- and by awarding scholarships and grants. Headquartered in Lisbon, where Calouste Gulbenkian spent his last years, the Foundation is also home to a scientific investigation centre in Oeiras, and runs delegations in Paris and London -- cities where Calouste Gulbenkian lived. http://www.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: In the recent past ZnO has emerged as a promising alternative to Si and GaN in devices like light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photodetectors, and optically pumped lasers for the UV region1-3. ZnO has several special properties such as direct wide bandgap (~3.37eV)4, radiation resistance, high adsorption capacity, high exciton energy (~60meV)4, high mechanical and thermal stabilities, and transparency in the visible range of the electromagnetic radiation4-6. In recent times, one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures of ZnO have attracted considerable attention of researchers, because of its unique properties (such as controllable shape and size)7-10. A variety of 1-D nanostructures of ZnO, such as nanostructures7, nanowires (NWs)8, nanorods (NRs)9, nanoparticles10, spirals11, nanoneedle12, and nanocombs13 can be grown by different synthesis techniques7-13. Among these 1-D nanostructures, NRs and NWs are the most popular and commonly used structures of ZnO, for different applications. The ZnO-NRs can be grown by a variety of techniques like sol-gel method14, atomic layer deposition (ALD)15, thermal evaporation16, electrodeposition17, spray pyrolysis18, hydrothermal9, and chemical vapor deposition19. Most of these growth techniques are complex and require high growth temperatures (600-1000°C)12, 16. The hydrothermal method has attracted considerable interest because of its simplicity and low-temperature processing9, 20-23. Different nanostructures of ZnO such as nanoflowers21, nano-crystals22, and nanopencils23 could be grown by hydrothermal techniques. In the past decade, a lot of work has been done on ZnO-NR-based devices like optically pumped lasers24, field effect transistors25, and biological and chemical sensors etc26. Among these, ZnO-NR-based UV detectors and optical switches have been the focus of wide studies 27, 28. In recent times, many groups have reported the UV detection properties of ZnO thin films and ZnO nanostructures-based devices28-30. Li et al. reported Au/ZnO NR array-based UV photodetectors (UV-PDs) with good sensitivity (contrast ratio ~ 4.7)30. They have grown ZnO-NR arrays on F-doped SnO2 (FTO) substrates by hydrothermal synthesis. Humayun et al. reported a ZnO nanostructure decorated microgap electrodes UV sensor. They have compared the UV sensing properties of Au/Ti/ZnO thin film and Au/Ti/ZnO NR array deposited in selective areas of the microgap electrodes spacing31. They concluded that the fabricated devices could be used for low power miniaturized devices having rapid response and reproducibility31. Witkowski et al. have reported UV detector properties of ZnO-NRs grown on quartz substrates by the hydrothermal method. They have fabricated ohmic contacts of Ti/Au on ZnO-NRs and their detector showed a sensitivity of 20 mW/m2 upon UV illumination32. Zhou et al. reported Pt/ZnO-NR and Pt/modified ZnO-NR based Schottky UV detectors. They have used different seed layers and metal oxide (MgZnO, MgO, and Al-doped ZnO) modifying layer materials. They reported that the ZnO-NRs UV-PD, which was grown on MgZnO seed layer and without oxide material-coating, demonstrated bigger responsivity and a larger detectivity than PDs with a ZnO seed layer33. Liu et al. have reported UV detectors based on the vertically aligned ZnO micro/nanowires on graphene, which showed high responsivity of 1.62 A W?1 per volt34. Nie et al. have reported monolayer graphene (MLG) film/ZnO NR Schottky UV detectors with quick response of millisecond rise time/fall times35. Dang et al. have reported ZnO nanostructure/graphene (Gr) based UV detectors with high responsivity (RI ~ 3 × 105 A W?1)36. Although there have been several works that reported on the UV-sensing properties using ZnO NRs, there are only a few reports on the UV-sensing of ZnO-NRs (grown by the hydrothermal-method) at a low-voltage. The main focus of this work is to examine the UV-sensing characteristics of Ag/ZnO-NRs Schottky devices at forward applied bias over the range 0 V to 1 V. The results show that these devices could be useful for cost-effective and low-voltage UV detection applications. ### Additional co-authors of this paper include Dr. Shaivalini Singh, International Research Professor, Department of Electronic Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do South Korea and Professor S. Jit, Associate Professor, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, BHU, Varanasi, India. The corresponding author is Professor Si-Hyun Park, Department of Electronic Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do South Korea, . For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In the recent past ZnO has emerged as a promising alternative to Si and GaN in devices like light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photodetectors, and optically pumped lasers for the UV region1-3. ZnO has several special properties such as direct wide bandgap (~3.37eV)4, radiation resistance, high adsorption capacity, high exciton energy (~60meV)4, high mechanical and thermal stabilities, and transparency in the visible range of the electromagnetic radiation4-6. In recent times, one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures of ZnO have attracted considerable attention of researchers, because of its unique properties (such as controllable shape and size)7-10. A variety of 1-D nanostructures of ZnO, such as nanostructures7, nanowires (NWs)8, nanorods (NRs)9, nanoparticles10, spirals11, nanoneedle12, and nanocombs13 can be grown by different synthesis techniques7-13. Among these 1-D nanostructures, NRs and NWs are the most popular and commonly used structures of ZnO, for different applications. The ZnO-NRs can be grown by a variety of techniques like sol-gel method14, atomic layer deposition (ALD)15, thermal evaporation16, electrodeposition17, spray pyrolysis18, hydrothermal9, and chemical vapor deposition19. Most of these growth techniques are complex and require high growth temperatures (600-1000°C)12, 16. The hydrothermal method has attracted considerable interest because of its simplicity and low-temperature processing9, 20-23. Different nanostructures of ZnO such as nanoflowers21, nano-crystals22, and nanopencils23 could be grown by hydrothermal techniques. In the past decade, a lot of work has been done on ZnO-NR-based devices like optically pumped lasers24, field effect transistors25, and biological and chemical sensors etc26. Among these, ZnO-NR-based UV detectors and optical switches have been the focus of wide studies 27, 28. In recent times, many groups have reported the UV detection properties of ZnO thin films and ZnO nanostructures-based devices28-30. Li et al. reported Au/ZnO NR array-based UV photodetectors (UV-PDs) with good sensitivity (contrast ratio ~ 4.7)30. They have grown ZnO-NR arrays on F-doped SnO2 (FTO) substrates by hydrothermal synthesis. Humayun et al. reported a ZnO nanostructure decorated microgap electrodes UV sensor. They have compared the UV sensing properties of Au/Ti/ZnO thin film and Au/Ti/ZnO NR array deposited in selective areas of the microgap electrodes spacing31. They concluded that the fabricated devices could be used for low power miniaturized devices having rapid response and reproducibility31. Witkowski et al. have reported UV detector properties of ZnO-NRs grown on quartz substrates by the hydrothermal method. They have fabricated ohmic contacts of Ti/Au on ZnO-NRs and their detector showed a sensitivity of 20 mW/m2 upon UV illumination32. Zhou et al. reported Pt/ZnO-NR and Pt/modified ZnO-NR based Schottky UV detectors. They have used different seed layers and metal oxide (MgZnO, MgO, and Al-doped ZnO) modifying layer materials. They reported that the ZnO-NRs UV-PD, which was grown on MgZnO seed layer and without oxide material-coating, demonstrated bigger responsivity and a larger detectivity than PDs with a ZnO seed layer33. Liu et al. have reported UV detectors based on the vertically aligned ZnO micro/nanowires on graphene, which showed high responsivity of 1.62 A W?1 per volt34. Nie et al. have reported monolayer graphene (MLG) film/ZnO NR Schottky UV detectors with quick response of millisecond rise time/fall times35. Dang et al. have reported ZnO nanostructure/graphene (Gr) based UV detectors with high responsivity (RI ~ 3 × 105 A W?1)36. Although there have been several works that reported on the UV-sensing properties using ZnO NRs, there are only a few reports on the UV-sensing of ZnO-NRs (grown by the hydrothermal-method) at a low-voltage. The main focus of this work is to examine the UV-sensing characteristics of Ag/ZnO-NRs Schottky devices at forward applied bias over the range 0 V to 1 V. The results show that these devices could be useful for cost-effective and low-voltage UV detection applications. Additional co-authors of this paper include Dr. Shaivalini Singh, International Research Professor, Department of Electronic Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do South Korea and Professor S. Jit, Associate Professor, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, BHU, Varanasi, India. The corresponding author is Professor Si-Hyun Park, Department of Electronic Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do South Korea, sihyun_park@ynu.ac.kr. This research (DOI) can be found in the NANO journal.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

An international team of researchers from the University of Rome Tor Vergata and the University of Montreal has reported, in a paper published this week in Nature Communications, the design and synthesis of a nanoscale molecular slingshot made of DNA that is 20,000 times smaller than a human hair. This molecular slingshot could "shoot" and deliver drugs at precise locations in the human body once triggered by specific disease markers. The molecular slingshot is only a few nanometres long and is composed of a synthetic DNA strand that can load a drug and then effectively act as the rubber band of the slingshot. The two ends of this DNA "rubber band" contain two anchoring moieties that can specifically stick to a target antibody, a Y-shaped protein expressed by the body in response to different pathogens such as bacteria and viruses. When the anchoring moieties of the slingshot recognize and bind to the arms of the target antibody the DNA "rubber band" is stretched and the loaded drug is released. "One impressive feature about this molecular slingshot," says Francesco Ricci, Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Rome Tor Vergata, "is that it can only be triggered by the specific antibody recognizing the anchoring tags of the DNA 'rubber band'. By simply changing these tags, one can thus program the slingshot to release a drug in response to a variety of specific antibodies. Since different antibodies are markers of different diseases, this could become a very specific weapon in the clinician's hands." "Another great property of our slingshot," adds Alexis Vallée-Bélisle, Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Montreal, "is its high versatility. For example, until now we have demonstrated the working principle of the slingshot using three different trigger antibodies, including an HIV antibody, and employing nucleic acids as model drugs. But thanks to the high programmability of DNA chemistry, one can now design the DNA slingshot to 'shoot' a wide range of threrapeutic molecules." "Designing this molecular slingshot was a great challenge," says Simona Ranallo, a postdoctoral researcher in Ricci's team and principal author of the new study. "It required a long series of experiments to find the optimal design, which keeps the drug loaded in 'rubber band' in the absence of the antibody, without affecting too much its shooting efficiency once the antibody triggers the slingshot." The group of researchers is now eager to adapt the slingshot for the delivery of clinically relevant drugs, and to demonstrate its clinical efficiency. "We envision that similar molecular slingshots may be used in the near future to deliver drugs to specific locations in the body. This would drastically improve the efficiency of drugs as well as decrease their toxic secondary effects," concludes Ricci. The next step in the project is to target a specific disease and drug for which the therapeutic slingshot can be adapted for testing on cells in vitro, prior to testing in mice. Carl Prévost-Tremblay (UofM) and Andrea Idili (UofT) are also co-authors on this study. This study was funded by Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro (project no. 14420), by the European Research Council (project no. 336493) by the International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES), by the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (grant no. 2014- 06403) and by the Canada Research Chair in Bioengineering and Bio-nanotechnology, Tier II (AVB).


WALTHAM, Mass., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:NERV), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders, will host a Research and Development Day to highlight unmet needs, including negative symptoms and cognitive impairment, and emerging treatment strategies in schizophrenia in New York City on March 2, 2017 from 8:00 am to 9:30 am Eastern Time. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Philip Harvey, PhD (University of Miami) and René Kahn, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for schizophrenia. Dr. Remy Luthringer, president and chief executive officer of Minerva, will provide an overview of the Company’s ongoing clinical development work with MIN-101, including the Company’s clinical strategy moving forward.  The presenters will be available to answer questions following the breakfast. Philip D. Harvey, PhD is Leonard M. Miller Professor of Psychiatry and director of the Division of Psychology at the University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine and a VA Senior Health Scientist.  Dr. Harvey’s research has focused on cognition and functioning, and he has written extensively on aging in schizophrenia, negative symptoms in schizophrenia, functional impairments in severe mental illness, the cognitive effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics, and the effects of cognitive enhancing agents and cognitive training in various conditions.  Dr. Harvey is a widely cited author who was repeatedly designated by Thomson-Reuters as being in the top 1% of all researchers in citations in mental health each year since 2010. He has received numerous awards for his research in schizophrenia. Dr. René Kahn is the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and System Chair of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Kahn and his research group have been instrumental in showing that brain changes in schizophrenia are progressive over time and have helped educate the medical community on the clinical relevance of these changes on cognitive function.  He has served as principal investigator on several clinical trials for schizophrenia and has published over 800 research papers. He was Treasurer and Vice President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is currently past-President of The Schizophrenia International Research Society. He is a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers and business development professionals only.  Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve a spot, please reply to this email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com. A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170302/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at http://ir.minervaneurosciences.com. MIN-101 is a drug candidate with equipotent affinities for sigma 2 and 5‑hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT ) and lower affinity at α1-adrenergic receptors. MIN-101 has no direct dopaminergic post-synaptic blocking effects, known to be involved in some side effects like extrapyramidal symptoms, sedation, prolactin increases and weight gain. As described by the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is a chronic and severe disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels and acts1.  In 2015 approximately 3.2 million people suffered from schizophrenia in the U.S., Japan and the five major European markets.  Schizophrenic patients suffer from positive, negative and cognitive symptoms.  Negative symptoms are disruptions to normal emotions and behaviors that may signal social withdrawal.  Patients may be socially inhibited, lack the ability to begin and sustain planned activities, or speak little even when forced to interact.  Negative symptoms account for a substantial portion of the morbidity associated with schizophrenia2.  They persist chronically throughout an individual patient’s lifetime and increase with severity over time.  Similar to negative symptoms, cognitive symptoms may be difficult to recognize and often are detected only when specific testing is performed.  Cognitive symptoms include: poor “executive functioning,” or the ability to understand information and use it to make decisions; trouble focusing or paying attention; problems with “working memory,” or the ability to use information immediately after learning it.  Poor cognition is related to worse employment and social outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat CNS diseases.  Minerva’s proprietary compounds include: MIN-101, in clinical development for schizophrenia; MIN-117, in clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD); MIN-202 (JNJ-42847922), in clinical development for insomnia and MDD; and MIN-301, in pre-clinical development for Parkinson’s disease.  Minerva’s common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “NERV.”  For more information, please visit www.minervaneurosciences.com. 2 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, American Psychiatric Association.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

Cecilia Lanny Winata knew almost nothing about Poland before she was invited to move there from Singapore. At a 2013 zebrafish conference in Barcelona, Spain — where she presented her work on developmental genomics — she was approached by Jacek Kuznicki, director of the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IIMCB) in Warsaw, who asked if she might like to do science at his institute. The first thing she did was to look Poland up on a map. A visit to the institute three months later persuaded her that the Polish capital is as good a place to start a lab as any better-known science hub in Asia, Europe or North America. Impressed by the IIMCB's state-of-the-art labs, and by the spirit of optimism and enthusiasm among its staff, she decided to take a chance. “Frankly, I was scared about exploring the possibility of moving to a country I knew so little about,” she says. “But I find Warsaw to be a great place to do science, and I feel that as a young group leader I can establish myself in Poland for at least a couple of years.” Stretching from the Baltic Sea in the north to the wild Tatra Mountains in the south, Poland is larger than Italy or the United Kingdom. Like most European countries, it has a long and noble tradition of science and scholarship, epitomized by the likes of Nicolaus Copernicus and Marie Curie. But Polish science, like its national history, has been turbulent. During more than four decades of communist rule, when the country was effectively a satellite state of the Soviet Union, Polish scientists were largely isolated from the rest of the world. Communist regimes generously supported scientific research that was often conducted in secrecy. But when communism imploded around 1990, science in Poland (and throughout Eastern Europe) suffered a dramatic financial collapse and an exodus of researchers. Those days of hardship are over. Poland's research intensity — the percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) spent on science — almost doubled between 2005 and 2015, to 1%. Its GDP grew even faster, so overall public and private science spending more than tripled, to €4.3 billion (US$4.6 billion). And since 2004, when the country was one of several from the former Eastern bloc to join the European Union, about €100 billion in EU infrastructure funding has been spent on modernizing roads, hospitals — and scientific facilities. Economically, Poland is already the most successful transition country in Eastern Europe. As for its standing in science, it seems to be en route to regaining lost strength and talent. Poland is already taking the lion's share of scientific publications produced in Eastern Europe. An influx of foreign researchers such as Winata and the creation of international centres and research facilities add a cosmopolitan touch to the country's science. And the proportion of funding through competitive grants is sharply rising. As a result, Poland's contribution to 68 leading science journals examined for Nature's 2016 rising-stars index leapt by 12.7% between 2014 and 2015 (see Nature 535, S56–S61; 2016). But although the brain drain is abating, the European Research Council is still awarding few of its prestigious grants to Polish science institutions — just 3 last year and 16 since 2007 — far fewer than have gone to the United Kingdom, Germany or Hungary. An ambitious scheme, launched last year, aims to create a network of independent research centres that will lure more top scientists. The IIMCB, established in 1999, is emblematic of the country's upswing. In line with international practice, group leaders are selected in open competition and employed on fixed-term contracts. Their research performance is regularly evaluated by an international advisory board. Thanks to the institute's reputation, Winata found it much easier than she had expected to quickly establish a competitive multinational group that includes Polish and Indian PhD students, two postdocs who have returned from abroad and one postdoc from Pakistan. Her exploratory visit had already convinced her that the institute's zebrafish facilities and experimental equipment are top-notch. Salaries, although on average about one-third of those in Western Europe, were no hindrance, she say. The IIMCB leads the EU-funded FishMed project — aimed at establishing zebrafish models for human diseases — which allows her to offer her lab members more money than universities and institutes that rely solely on Polish funding sources. The €3.6-million project also involves elite centres in Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. “Being able to closely collaborate and exchange staff and students with leading groups in other countries is a big plus,” she says. EU infrastructure funding has helped to refurbish existing labs and create new campuses and science parks across Poland. Warsaw is the country's main research hub, but other cities have benefited as well. The Małopolskie Centre of Biotechnology in Krakow, which received €24 million in structural funds, and the EIT+ science campus in Wrocław, which got more than €200 million, boast ample lab space and research equipment. But the international success of the IIMCB, whose researchers have published in Nature and other high-impact journals, isn't easily replicated (see 'In Pole position'). Poland needs brainpower to establish itself as a scientific nation of international rank, says Maciej Żylicz, president of the Foundation for Polish Science, the country's biggest independent research-funding agency. “We have fantastic labs by now, but we're lacking enough scientists,” he says. “We must attract more foreign talent.” Persuading aspiring foreign scientists to come and do science in Poland hasn't been easy. Some among the country's traditionally conservative academic community are suspicious of attempts to make science more international, more competitive and less hierarchical. At universities, the power over money, research directions and publications often still resides with established professors, who tend to resist change. Early-stage independence, which is crucial for a young scientist looking for a professional career in international science, is rare. “Any progress in science depends on courage to try new things, something that has been missing in Poland in the past,” says Olga Malinkiewicz, founder of the Wrocław-based Saule Technologies, a privately backed solar-energy company. “And if you never were in touch with good scientists abroad you can't really change things at home.” No one was studying photonics seriously in Poland in 2006, when Malinkiewicz left for graduate studies in Spain. While at the University of Valencia, she developed a type of efficient solar cell based on a promising material called perovskite (see Nature 513, 470; 2014). Potential investors began to line up before she finished her PhD, and when the opportunity arose in 2014 to start her own company in premises rented from the EIT+, she didn't think twice. Her expanding company has since moved to the Wrocław Technology Park, where commercialization of perovskite-based solar cells is set to start this year. Although no official figures have been made public, a Japanese investor is said to have provided $5.3 million. Meanwhile, the Foundation for Polish Science has launched an ambitious attempt to create a network of independent basic-research institutes run by international-calibre researchers. Ten planned centres will each operate in strategic partnership with an existing institute abroad, and will focus on emerging fields. The government has earmarked €126 million in EU structural funds for this International Research Agendas programme. What's new, says Żylicz, is that the centres will be built up around individual scientists who will have maximum freedom to define research directions and hire staff — a principle adopted from the German Max Planck Society, which has successfully applied it for decades. “An empty lab is not a good starting point for science,” he says. “That's why we will look for strong leaders first and then apply a tailor-made research structure around them.” Tomasz Dietl and Tomasz Wojtowicz, two Polish semiconductor physicists who last June won the first round of competition for funding, have received 40 million złoty ($9.8 million) for research on topological phases of matter and new classes of exotic materials. The windfall, says Dietl, will allow him to hire some 40 scientists and set up 6 groups at an international centre in Warsaw, hosted by the Polish Academy of Science's Institute of Physics. “We're not the centre of the universe,” he says. “But we can offer a great deal of scientific freedom, excellent research conditions, nice salaries and good connections with top institutes abroad.” Researchers at the institute will be able to rely on experimental facilities, such as equipment for crystal growth and low-temperature physics, that are on a par with the best centres in Western Europe, says solid-state physicist Laurens Molenkamp of the University of Würzburg in Germany. He has a long-standing collaboration with Dietl and will serve as an adviser to the new centre. “The molecular-beam facilities they now have in Warsaw are pretty unique in Europe,” he says. Winners of the second open call will be announced in April, and two more calls will follow. Żylicz hopes that the programme will eventually draw a few dozen principal investigators and hundreds of international postdocs to do science in Poland. Funding for each centre is limited to five years. “But as they learn to swim in Polish waters I hope that many newcomers will opt to stay longer,” he says. Competition for funds is much less fierce in Poland than in Germany and many other countries, says Austrian-born structural biologist Sebastian Glatt, who leads an independent research group funded by the Max Planck Society at the Małopolskie Centre of Biotechnology. Things there have turned out so well for him that he is considering extending his stay in Poland beyond the envisaged five years. Within a year of starting, his lab had grown to 16 members — including postdocs from Austria, Spain, Taiwan and Ukraine — and it is set to keep expanding. He has no teaching obligations and is pleased with his success in attracting foreign talent and securing grant money from Polish and European sources. “There is abundant grant money available in Poland now and it is easy for junior scientists with a good track record to get funded here,” he says. “That's a huge advantage — and from the large number of job applications I receive, I can see that many people are aware of it.” Scientists who consider moving to Poland, says Winata, should make sure that their host institute is prepared to help foreigners to acclimatize, for example by supporting them in dealing with authorities and landlords. They should also choose institutes that adopt an open-minded and communicative research culture. Glatt is keen for students to openly discuss their work in department seminars and for scientists to exchange ideas while meeting in core research facilities or during social events. “Office doors at our institutes are wide open all the time,” he says. The government is set to continue to enlarge and modernize Poland's research base. Teaming up with high-profile institutes in Western Europe will assist that effort, and will also help Polish science to get international recognition, says Żylicz. The Max Planck Society plans to expand its collaboration with Poland, and France, Switzerland and Spain are also potential partners. Outside the new labs and campuses, Poland has turned into a colourful place with liberal cities brimming with restaurants, bars and theatres. “Poland has become a much different country to the one I had left ten years ago,” says Malinkiewicz. “Something is happening here, and now is a perfect moment for scientists to come and grab their piece of cake.”


Banff-based world leading math institute is a joint Canada, Alberta, U.S., and Mexico initiative When mathematicians and scientists connect and collaborate, they often come up with new ideas that can help solve some of the world's most pressing environmental, health and economic issues. That's why the Government of Canada is joining the province of Alberta, along with the United States and Mexico, in an effort to fund mathematics research at the Banff International Research Station (BIRS), one of the world's leading centres of mathematical research and discovery. The Honourable Kent Hehr, Minister of Veteran Affairs, on behalf of the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, and Cameron Westhead, MLA for Banff-Cochrane, on behalf of the Honourable Deron Bilous, Alberta Minister of Economic Development and Trade, today announced $12.8 million in new funding for BIRS, a global hub for math research. Each year the Station gives more than 2,000 researchers from more than 60 countries an opportunity to meet with peers to share ideas on the frontiers of mathematics knowledge. The collaboration among these brilliant and creative mathematical minds leads to groundbreaking research ventures in clean energy technology, computer science, climate science, a full range of biology areas from cell biology to ecology, and the prediction and mitigation of natural disasters. Their breakthroughs and resulting applications help to create safe communities, a healthy environment and a strong, vibrant middle class. "It is incredibly exciting to have one of the world's best mathematical institutes here in Alberta. Students and mathematicians come from across the globe in order to learn new methods and participate in groundbreaking discoveries. I am excited the Government of Canada is investing in such an excellent example of Canada's research excellence." "Our government is committed to supporting the full suite of fundamental and applied research, from science and engineering to technology and mathematics. Today's announcement is a testament to our government's belief in the role that researchers, be they from Canada or abroad, play producing evidence-based solutions that will support a clean environment, a sustainable economy and a strong middle class." "Mathematics forms the basis of virtually every scientific endeavour. Experts collaborating at the Banff International Research Station are providing us with multiple, diverse points of view that will ultimately provide new tools and techniques to help tackle the world's toughest research challenges. We are proud to support such a unique, international collaboration." "Bringing thousands of the world's best researchers to Alberta has benefits for every sector in our province including energy, technology, health, agriculture, forestry and manufacturing. By supporting BIRS we are supporting research and innovation that will help create a diversified economy for the future." - The Honourable Deron Bilous, Alberta Minister of Economic Development and Trade "It's with great enthusiasm that the Division of Mathematical Sciences at the U.S. National Science Foundation continues this productive collaboration with its esteemed North American partners. This collaboration represents a unique effort aimed at bringing together mathematical scientists, fostering collaboration and advancing work on some of the most challenging scientific and mathematical problems. We value this partnership and are proud to continue our participation!" "The renewal of this unprecedented multinational funding validates the importance, and vigour of the research conducted at BIRS. It is a tremendous success for a remarkable and groundbreaking North American collaboration in support of the world's mathematical sciences and their manifestations in science, technology, and society." - Doug Mitchell, Chair of the Board of Directors, Banff International Research Station "The association of our top researchers with BIRS has given a tremendous boost to Mexico's mathematical science community. The BIRS-CMO (Casa Matemática Oaxaca) partnership, which includes the Institute of Mathematics of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the CONACYT Centre, Centro de Investigación en Matemáticas, represents a unique joint educational and scientific research program in the NAFTA space, that we are hoping to emulate in the other sciences." Information on the Collaborative and Thematic Resources Support in Mathematics and Statistics Program Where NSERC Invests and Why NSERC invests over $1 billion each year in natural sciences and engineering research in Canada. Our investments deliver discoveries-valuable world-firsts in knowledge claimed by a brain trust of over 11,000 professors. Our investments enable partnerships and collaborations that connect industry with discoveries and the people behind them. Researcher-industry partnerships established by NSERC help inform R&D, solve scale-up challenges, and reduce the risks of developing high-potential technology. NSERC also provides scholarships and hands-on training experience for more than 30,000 post-secondary students and postdoctoral fellows. These young researchers will be the next generation of science and engineering leaders in Canada.


Le centre de recherche en mathématiques de calibre mondial de Banff est une initiative conjointe du gouvernement du Canada, de l'Alberta, des Etats-Unis et du Mexique CALGARY, ALBERTA--(Marketwired - 10 fév. 2017) - Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada Quand les mathématiciens et les autres scientifiques échangent et collaborent entre eux, il en ressort souvent des solutions inédites qui contribuent à résoudre certains des problèmes les plus pressants en matière d'environnement, de santé et d'économie. C'est pourquoi le gouvernement du Canada fait équipe avec l'Alberta, les États-Unis et le Mexique pour appuyer la recherche en mathématiques menée à la Banff International Research Station (BIRS), un des principaux centres de recherche et de découverte dans ce domaine. L'honorable Kent Hehr, ministre des Anciens Combattants, au nom de l'honorable Kirsty Duncan, ministre des Sciences, et Cameron Westhead, député provincial de Banff-Cochrane, au nom de l'honorable Deron Bilous, ministre du Développement économique et du Commerce de l'Alberta, ont annoncé aujourd'hui un nouveau financement de 12,8 millions de dollars pour la BIRS, plaque tournante mondiale de la recherche en mathématiques. Chaque année, ce centre de recherche international offre à plus de 2 000 chercheurs de plus de 60 pays la possibilité de se réunir pour échanger des idées aux frontières des connaissances en mathématiques. La collaboration entre ces grands esprits créatifs débouche sur des projets de recherche avant-gardistes dans le domaine des technologies de l'énergie propre, de l'informatique, des sciences du climat, de la prédiction et de l'atténuation des catastrophes naturelles, ainsi que de tout un éventail de sous-domaines de la biologie allant de la biologie cellulaire à l'écologie. Les percées qu'ils réalisent et les applications concrètes de celles-ci contribuent à créer des collectivités sures, un environnement sain et une classe moyenne forte et dynamique. « Nous sommes tout à fait enchantés d'avoir ici, en Alberta, un des meilleurs centres de recherche en mathématiques du monde. Des étudiants et des mathématiciens des quatre coins de la planète y viennent pour se familiariser avec les nouvelles méthodes et participer à des découvertes révolutionnaires. Je suis ravi que le gouvernement du Canada investisse dans un si bel exemple de l'excellence en recherche au pays. » « Le gouvernement du Canada est déterminé à appuyer tous les domaines de recherche fondamentale et appliquée, qu'il s'agisse de sciences, de génie, de technologie ou de mathématiques. Avec l'annonce d'aujourd'hui, il montre qu'il croit au rôle que jouent les chercheurs d'ici et d'ailleurs pour ce qui est de trouver des solutions innovantes qui favoriseront un environnement propre, une économie durable et une classe moyenne forte. » « Les mathématiques sont à la base de pratiquement tous les travaux scientifiques. Les spécialistes réunis à la Banff International Research Station apportent des points de vue nombreux et diversifiés, ce qui en retour donnera accès à de nouvelles techniques et à de nouveaux outils pour relever les plus grands défis en recherche dans le monde. Nous sommes fiers d'appuyer une collaboration internationale aussi exceptionnelle. » - B. Mario Pinto, président du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada « Le fait de réunir en Alberta des milliers de chercheurs parmi les meilleurs du monde procure des avantages dans tous les secteurs de la province, notamment ceux de l'énergie, des technologies, de la santé, de l'agriculture, de la foresterie et de la fabrication. En appuyant la BIRS, nous appuyons la recherche et l'innovation qui contribueront à créer une économie diversifiée pour l'avenir. » - L'honorable Deron Bilous, ministre du Développement économique et du Commerce de l'Alberta « C'est avec beaucoup d'enthousiasme que la Division des sciences mathématiques de la National Science Foundation des États-Unis poursuit sa collaboration fructueuse avec ses estimés partenaires nord-américains. Cette collaboration est unique en ce qu'elle vise à réunir des scientifiques travaillant en mathématiques, à favoriser la coopération et à avancer les travaux sur certains des problèmes mathématiques et scientifiques les plus épineux. Ce partenariat est précieux et nous sommes fiers de continuer à y participer. » - Michael Vogelius, directeur, Division des sciences mathématiques, à la National Science Foundation des États-Unis « Le renouvèlement de ce financement multinational sans précédent confirme l'importance et la vigueur de la recherche menée à la BIRS. Il s'agit d'une grande réussite pour cette collaboration nord-américaine à la fois remarquable et novatrice qui appuie la recherche en mathématiques dans le monde et ses applications dans les sciences, la technologie et la société. » - Doug Mitchell, président du conseil d'administration de la Banff International Research Station « L'association de nos meilleurs chercheurs à la BIRS a donné un essor considérable au milieu des mathématiques du Mexique. Le partenariat entre la BIRS et la Maison des mathématiques d'Oaxaca, qui inclut l'Institut de mathématiques de l'Université autonome nationale du Mexique et le Centre de recherche en mathématiques du CONACYT, représente un programme d'enseignement et de recherche scientifique mixte unique dans l'espace de l'ALENA. Nous espérons l'étendre aux autres sciences. » - Enrique Cabrero Mendoza, directeur du Conseil national des sciences et de la technologie du Mexique (CONACYT) Information sur le Programme d'appui aux ressources thématiques et collaboratives en mathématiques et en statistique Suivre la ministre Duncan dans les médias sociaux Suivre le CRSNG dans les médias sociaux Chaque année, le CRSNG investit plus d'un milliard de dollars dans la recherche en sciences naturelles et en génie au Canada. Grâce à ces fonds, plus de 11 000 professeurs, chercheurs de calibre mondial, font des découvertes et produisent des percées scientifiques. Ces fonds favorisent également les partenariats et les collaborations qui rapprochent les entreprises des découvertes et des découvreurs. Les partenariats que le CRSNG permet d'établir entre les chercheurs et les entreprises contribuent à orienter la R et D, à relever les défis que pose le passage du laboratoire au marché et à réduire les risques associés au développement de technologies à fort potentiel. Le CRSNG offre également des bourses et de la formation pratique à plus de 30 000 étudiants de niveau postsecondaire et stagiaires postdoctoraux. Ces jeunes chercheurs forment la prochaine génération de chefs de file en sciences et en génie au Canada.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MILAN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Newron Pharmaceuticals S.p.A. (“Newron”), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of novel therapies for patients with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and pain, today announces its financial results for the year ended December 31, 2016, and reiterates material events with the outlook for 2017. In addition, Newron presents the approved agenda for the 2017 AGM. Xadago® launched in ten additional European countries Following the 2015 European approval and the launch in Germany, 2016 saw the launch of Xadago® in ten further European markets by Newron’s partner Zambon. The launch in, among others, Italy, Spain, the UK and Switzerland, means that a large and increasing number of patients across Europe can now be treated using Xadago®, the first New Chemical Entity in ten years to receive Marketing Authorization from the EU Commission for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. From the initial launch of Xadago® in Germany in May 2015, Newron has generated cumulated royalty revenues of EUR 2.2 million on product sales by its partner Zambon. Post-period, Zambon and Seqirus announced that they have entered a partnership for the registration and commercialisation of Xadago® in Australia and New Zealand. Following the news in March 2016 that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had issued a CRL for Xadago®, Newron announced, in July 2016, alongside its partners U.S. WorldMeds and Zambon, that the FDA no longer required the Company to perform any studies to clinically evaluate the potential abuse liability or dependence/withdrawal effects of Xadago®, the key subject of the CRL. In October 2016, Newron welcomed the FDA’s announcement that it considered the September 2016 re-submission of the U.S. NDA by the Company to be a complete Class 2 response. “We are hopeful that Xadago® will be approved in the U.S. on or before its PDUFA date of March 21 and that it will become available to U.S. patients, in the near future,” comments Ravi Anand, Newron’s Chief Medical Officer. Progress with Evenamide In April 2016, Newron presented a poster at the 5th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference titled “Evenamide (NW–3509), a Putative Antipsychotic, Targets Abnormal Electrical Activity and Glutamatergic Abnormalities in Improving Psychotic Symptoms in Patients with Schizophrenia in a Phase II, Placebo-controlled Trial”. The encouraging results of this Phase IIa study were announced post period in January 2017. Evenamide met the study objectives of good tolerability, safety, and preliminary evidence of efficacy as an add-on therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Detailed results of the study will be presented at the 16th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR), in March, in San Diego (CA), USA. Studies initiated with Sarizotan In May 2016, the FDA approved Newron’s Investigational New Drug (IND) application for the evaluation of sarizotan for the treatment of patients with Rett syndrome. Following this approval, in July the Company initiated its potentially pivotal clinical STARS study that will evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of sarizotan in patients with Rett syndrome suffering from respiratory symptoms. The initiation of the STARS study is an important milestone within the development program for sarizotan. As of December 31, 2016, the study is enrolling patients in both the USA and Europe. As part of Newron’s wider commitment to addressing the needs of Rett syndrome patients, the Company is currently sponsoring a study to evaluate the burden of disease experienced by patients with this debilitating condition and their families. The study will be comprised of two global surveys, one to be completed by at least 750 caregivers and the other by at least 210 healthcare providers(HCP). The surveys have been developed in accordance with regulatory guidance, with the final versions being used for data collection in the USA, the UK, Italy, Germany and the Netherlands. Financial Summary (IFRS) In thousand EUR (except per share information) Newron’s 2016 Annual Report is available on http://www.newron.com/financial-report. Outlook for 2017 “We look forward to the decision on the forthcoming PDUFA date for Xadago® on or around March 21 and are confident that in 2017, we will see Xadago® become available to patients in the USA and additional European territories. We are highly encouraged by the potential of both sarizotan and Evenamide and we look forward to continuing the development of both in the ongoing year. Our innovative pipeline is progressing well and we will strengthen our position as a leading player in the CNS disease area. We started 2017 with funds totalling EUR 46.5 million, which we anticipate will take our Company towards the end of 2018, beyond expected key value inflexion points”, comments Newron’s Chief Executive Officer Stefan Weber. AGM 2017 Agenda Newron’s Board of Directors has approved the agenda below for the March 28, 2017, 10:30 am CET, ordinary Shareholders’ meeting, which will take place at the Company’s registered office in Bresso (Mi), Italy. The formal invitation to shareholders will be issued and disclosed in the statutory papers on or about March 2. The full invitation and supporting material will be made available on the Company’s website on the same date. The agenda is as follows: Dial-in to media/analyst conference on March 2, 2017, 9:15-10:15 am CET The Newron management team will present the 2016 full year results and provide an update and guidance for 2017. The conference call can be accessed via the following dial-in numbers: The slide deck used in the call is available at http://www.newron.com/downloads About Newron Pharmaceuticals Newron (SIX: NWRN) is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of novel therapies for patients with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and pain. The Company is headquartered in Bresso near Milan, Italy, with a subsidiary in Morristown, NJ, U.S.A. Xadago® (safinamide) has received marketing authorization for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease in the European Union and Switzerland and is commercialized by Newron’s partner Zambon. US WorldMeds holds the commercialization rights in the US. Meiji Seika has the rights to develop and commercialize the compound in Japan and other key Asian territories. In addition to Xadago® for Parkinson’s disease, Newron has a strong pipeline of promising treatments for rare disease patients at various stages of clinical development, including sarizotan for patients with Rett syndrome and ralfinamide for patients with specific rare pain indications. Newron is also developing Evenamide as the potential first add-on therapy for the treatment of patients with positive symptoms of schizophrenia. www.newron.com Important Notices This document contains forward-looking statements, including (without limitation) about (1) Newron’ s ability to develop and expand its business, successfully complete development of its current product candidates and current and future collaborations for the development and commercialisation of its product candidates and reduce costs (including staff costs), (2) the market for drugs to treat CNS diseases and pain conditions, (3) Newron’s anticipated future revenues, capital expenditures and financial resources, and (4) assumptions underlying any such statements. In some cases these statements and assumptions can be identified by the fact that they use words such as “ will”, anticipate”, “ estimate”, “ expect”, “ project”, “intend”, “ plan”, “believe”, “ target”, and other words and terms of similar meaning. All statements, other than historical facts, contained herein regarding Newron's strategy, goals, plans, future financial position, projected revenues and costs and prospects are forward-looking statements. By their very nature, such statements and assumptions involve inherent risks and uncertainties, both general and specific, and risks exist that predictions, forecasts, projections and other outcomes described, assumed or implied therein will not be achieved. Future events and actual results could differ materially from those set out in, contemplated by or underlying the forward-looking statements due to a number of important factors. These factors include (without limitation) (1) uncertainties in the discovery, development or marketing of products, including without limitation negative results of clinical trials or research projects or unexpected side effects, (2) delay or inability in obtaining regulatory approvals or bringing products to market, (3) future market acceptance of products, (4) loss of or inability to obtain adequate protection for intellectual property rights, (5) inability to raise additional funds, (6) success of existing and entry into future collaborations and licensing agreements, (7) litigation, (8) loss of key executive or other employees, (9) adverse publicity and news coverage, and (10) competition, regulatory, legislative and judicial developments or changes in market and/or overall economic conditions. Newron may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in forward-looking statements and assumptions underlying any such statements may prove wrong. Investors should therefore not place undue reliance on them. There can be no assurance that actual results of Newron's research programmes, development activities, commercialisation plans, collaborations and operations will not differ materially from the expectations set out in such forward-looking statements or underlying assumptions. Newron does not undertake any obligation to publicly up-date or revise forward looking statements except as may be required by applicable regulations of the SIX Swiss Exchange where the shares of Newron are listed. This document does not contain or constitute an offer or invitation to purchase or subscribe for any securities of Newron and no part of it shall form the basis of or be relied upon in connection with any contract or commitment whatsoever.

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