Research Institute for Hallasan

Jeju Special Self Governing Province, South Korea

Research Institute for Hallasan

Jeju Special Self Governing Province, South Korea
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Kim K.K.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Lee K.C.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Eom M.K.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Kim J.-S.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bioindustry | And 4 more authors.
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology | Year: 2014

A novel bacterial strain designated GJW-30T was isolated from soil of the lava forest, Gotjawal, located in Aewol, Jeju, Korea. Strain GJW-30T was found to be strictly aerobic, Gram-negative and to form pleomorphic, non-motile rods and white colonies on R2A agar. The major fatty acids were identified as C18:1ω7c, C16:0 and C 17:0, the predominant isoprenoid quinone as Q-10, the polar lipids as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, an unidentified aminolipid and an unidentified lipid. The cell-wall sugar pattern of strain GJW-30T was found to be composed of glucose, ribose and rhamnose and meso-DAP as the diagnostic diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The DNA G+C content of strain GJW-30T is 62.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, showed that strain GJW-30T forms a deep branch within the order Rhizobiales, sharing the highest level of sequence homology with Bradyrhizobium oligotrophicum LMG 10732T (93.6 %). On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain GJW-30T is considered to represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Variibacter gotjawalensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (the type strain is GJW-30 T = KCTC 32391T = CECT 8514T = LMG 28093 T) is proposed. © 2014 Springer International Publishing.


Hyun T.K.,Chungbuk National University | Kim H.-C.,Research Institute for Hallasan | Ko Y.-J.,Jeju National University | Kim J.-S.,Jeju National University
Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2016

Crowberry (Empetrum nigrum L.) is a wild berry commonly found in the northern hemisphere. Crowberry fruits have been suggested as good resources for functional applications in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries, but the high polyphenolic content in crowberry leaves also indicates crowberry aerial parts as potential dietary health supplements. In this study, therefore, the biological activities of the aerial parts of Korean crowberry (E. nigrum var. japonicum) were investigated. Antioxidant activity was measured by three different assays on DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power, and total antioxidant capacities. Dose-dependent antioxidant activities were exhibited by crude methanol extract and its fractions, suggesting that the crude methanol extract and EtOAc fraction possessed strong antioxidant activities and capacities. In addition, the crude methanol extract and EtOAc strongly inhibited α-glucosidase activity and suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory mediator and nitrite oxide from LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These findings provide valuable evidence for the potential of such parts as good dietary sources of natural antioxidant, α-glucosidase inhibitory, and anti-inflammatory components, suggesting that using the non-edible parts (e.g., leaves and stems) of crowberry can be a potential natural avenue for improving human health. © 2015 The Authors.


Lee K.C.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Kim K.K.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Eom M.K.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Kim J.-S.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine BioindustryUljin | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology | Year: 2014

A novel bacterial strain designated CB4Twas isolated from soil from the Hallasan, Jeju, Korea. Strain CB4Twas found to be strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, motile and formed creamy greyish colonies on nutrient agar. The major fatty acids were identified as iso-C15 : 0and iso-C16 : 0, and the predominant isoprenoid quinone as MK-7. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained glycine and alanine as the diagnostic amino acids and phosphatidyl-Nmethylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminophospholipid as the polar lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CB4Twas 46.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, showed that strain CB4Tforms a deep branch within the genus Aneurinibacillus, sharing the highest level of sequence homology with Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus DSM 5562T(96.5 %). On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain CB4Tis considered to represent a novel species within the genus Aneurinibacillus, for which the name Aneurinibacillus soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CB4T(=KCTC 33505T=CECT 8566T). An emended description of the genus Aneurinibacillus is also proposed. © 2014 IUMS.


Lee K.C.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Kim K.K.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Eom M.K.,Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology | Kim J.-S.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bioindustry | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology | Year: 2015

A novel bacterial strain, designated SA3-7T, was isolated from soil of a lava forest located in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Cells of strain SA3-7T were Gram-stain-negative, oxidase-and catalasepositive, non-motile rods and produced creamy white colonies on ten-fold-diluted R2A agar. The isolate contained menaquinone-7 (MK-7) as the predominant isoprenoid quinone and summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c/C16: 1ω6c), iso-C15: 0 and iso-C17: 0 3-OH as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 43.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that strain SA3-7T was related most closely to Mucilaginibacter frigoritolerans FT22T (96.7% sequence similarity) and that it formed a separate lineage in the genus Mucilaginibacter. Combined phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics supported the conclusion that strain SA3-7T represents a novel species of the genus Mucilaginibacter, for which the name Mucilaginibacter gotjawali sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is SA3-7T (=KCTC 32515T=CECT 8628T=DSM 29289T). © 2015 IUMS.


Hyun T.K.,Gyeongsang National University | Kim H.-C.,Research Institute for Hallasan | Kim J.-S.,Jeju National University
Industrial Crops and Products | Year: 2014

The present study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic activities of methanol extract of Thymus quinquecostatus Celak and those of its partitioned fractions, including hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and aqueous. The antioxidant activities of the TQC extract were measured by 1,1-dephenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical scavenging and a reducing power assay. The antidiabetic activity was evaluated by α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibition assays. The results suggested that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of the MeOH crude extract possessed strong antioxidant activity and capacity. In addition, the EtOAc fraction showed remarkable antimicrobial activity against Kocuria rhizophila (MIC = 63 μg/ml) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 63 μg/ml). The findings also indicated that the MeOH crude extract and its EtOAc fraction contained strong antidiabetic activity. HPLC analysis identified (-)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, rutin, and rosmarinic acid as the active compounds in the TQC extract. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activity in the hexane fraction was positively associated with the amount of thymol. Taken together, these results suggest that the TQC extract could be exploited as an ingredient in antioxidant and antidiabetic supplements and in drugs to treat infectious diseases. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Research Institute for Hallasan, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bioindustry
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology | Year: 2014

A novel bacterial strain designated CB4(T) was isolated from soil from the Hallasan, Jeju, Korea. Strain CB4(T) was found to be strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, motile and formed creamy greyish colonies on nutrient agar. The major fatty acids were identified as iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(16:0), and the predominant isoprenoid quinone as MK-7. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained glycine and alanine as the diagnostic amino acids and phosphatidyl-N-methylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminophospholipid as the polar lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CB4(T) was 46.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, showed that strain CB4(T) forms a deep branch within the genus Aneurinibacillus, sharing the highest level of sequence homology with Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus DSM 5562(T) (96.5%). On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain CB4(T) is considered to represent a novel species within the genus Aneurinibacillus, for which the name Aneurinibacillus soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CB4(T) (=KCTC 33505(T)=CECT 8566(T)). An emended description of the genus Aneurinibacillus is also proposed.


PubMed | Research Institute for Hallasan, Seoul National University, Lazovsky State Nature Reserve, Russian Academy of Sciences and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: BMC genetics | Year: 2015

The roe deer, Capreolus sp., is one of the most widespread meso-mammals of Palearctic distribution, and includes two species, the European roe deer, C. capreolus inhabiting mainly Europe, and the Siberian roe deer, C. pygargus, distributed throughout continental Asia. Although there are a number of genetic studies concerning European roe deer, the Siberian roe deer has been studied less, and none of these studies use microsatellite markers. Natural processes have led to genetic structuring in wild populations. To understand how these factors have affected genetic structure and connectivity of Siberian roe deer, we investigated variability at 12 microsatellite loci for Siberian roe deer from ten localities in Asia.Moderate levels of genetic diversity (H(E) = 0.522 to 0.628) were found in all populations except in Jeju Island, South Korea, where the diversity was lowest (H(E)= 0.386). Western populations showed relatively low genetic diversity and higher degrees of genetic differentiation compared with eastern populations (mean Ar = 3.54 (east), 2.81 (west), mean F(ST) = 0.122). Bayesian-based clustering analysis revealed the existence of three genetically distinct groups (clusters) for Siberian roe deer, which comprise of the Southeastern group (Mainland Korea, Russian Far East, Trans-Baikal region and Northern part of Mongolia), Northwestern group (Western Siberia and Ural in Russia) and Jeju Island population. Genetic analyses including AMOVA (F(RT) = 0.200), Barrier and PCA also supported genetic differentiation among regions separated primarily by major mountain ridges, suggesting that mountains played a role in the genetic differentiation of Siberian roe deer. On the other hand, genetic evidence also suggests an ongoing migration that may facilitate genetic admixture at the border areas between two groups.Our results reveal an apparent pattern of genetic differentiation among populations inhabiting Asia, showing moderate levels of genetic diversity with an east-west gradient. The results suggest at least three distinct management units of roe deer in continental Asia, although genetic admixture is evident in some border areas. The insights obtained from this study shed light on management of Siberian roe deer in Asia and may be applied in conservation of local populations of Siberian roe deer.


Hyun T.K.,Chungbuk National University | Kim H.-C.,Research Institute for Hallasan | Ko Y.-J.,Jeju National University | Kim J.-S.,Jeju National University
Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2015

Crowberry (Empetrum nigrum L.) is a wild berry commonly found in the northern hemisphere. Crowberry fruits have been suggested as good resources for functional applications in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries, but the high polyphenolic content in crowberry leaves also indicates crowberry aerial parts as potential dietary health supplements. In this study, therefore, the biological activities of the aerial parts of Korean crowberry (E. nigrum var. japonicum) were investigated. Antioxidant activity was measured by three different assays on DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power, and total antioxidant capacities. Dose-dependent antioxidant activities were exhibited by crude methanol extract and its fractions, suggesting that the crude methanol extract and EtOAc fraction possessed strong antioxidant activities and capacities. In addition, the crude methanol extract and EtOAc strongly inhibited α-glucosidase activity and suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory mediator and nitrite oxide from LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These findings provide valuable evidence for the potential of such parts as good dietary sources of natural antioxidant, α-glucosidase inhibitory, and anti-inflammatory components, suggesting that using the non-edible parts (e.g., leaves and stems) of crowberry can be a potential natural avenue for improving human health. © 2015 The Authors.


PubMed | Research Institute for Hallasan, Chungbuk National University and Jeju National University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Indian journal of pharmaceutical sciences | Year: 2016

In this study, Prunus padus, Lonicera caerulea, Berberis amurensis, and Ribes maximowiczianum, which are mainly distributed on Mt. Halla, Jeju Island, have been investigated for their antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic activities. The methanol extracts of R. maximowiczianum leaves and P. padus branches exhibited significant and dose-dependent antioxidant activity including electron-donation ability and reducing power. To analyze the antimicrobial activity, each extract was tested by a serial two-fold dilution method against five selected gram-positive bacteria and four gram-negative bacteria, and this suggested that P. padus branches possessed the maximum antimicrobial activity against most of the gram-positive bacteria tested. In addition, the methanol extracts of P. padus branches exhibited the highest -glucosidase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.00.1 g/ml, indicating that P. padus is a promising source as a herbal medicine.


PubMed | Research Institute for Hallasan, Chungbuk National University and Jeju National University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Saudi journal of biological sciences | Year: 2016

Crowberry (Empetrum nigrum L.) is a wild berry commonly found in the northern hemisphere. Crowberry fruits have been suggested as good resources for functional applications in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries, but the high polyphenolic content in crowberry leaves also indicates crowberry aerial parts as potential dietary health supplements. In this study, therefore, the biological activities of the aerial parts of Korean crowberry (E. nigrum var. japonicum) were investigated. Antioxidant activity was measured by three different assays on DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power, and total antioxidant capacities. Dose-dependent antioxidant activities were exhibited by crude methanol extract and its fractions, suggesting that the crude methanol extract and EtOAc fraction possessed strong antioxidant activities and capacities. In addition, the crude methanol extract and EtOAc strongly inhibited -glucosidase activity and suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory mediator and nitrite oxide from LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These findings provide valuable evidence for the potential of such parts as good dietary sources of natural antioxidant, -glucosidase inhibitory, and anti-inflammatory components, suggesting that using the non-edible parts (e.g., leaves and stems) of crowberry can be a potential natural avenue for improving human health.

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