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Eiben C.,Co ordination Center for Gene Conservation | Vegi B.,Co ordination Center for Gene Conservation | Virag G.,Co ordination Center for Gene Conservation | Godor-Surmann K.,Co ordination Center for Gene Conservation | And 6 more authors.
Livestock Science | Year: 2011

As part of a trial to improve the fatty acid profile, vitamin E content and shelf-life of rabbit meat, this work studied the effects of level and source of vitamin E dietary addition on growth and carcass traits in NZW rabbits. A 10.6. MJ/kg digestible energy diet without added oil and with 60. mg/kg synthetic vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl-acetate) served as a control (C). Five other diets were 4% oil-enriched, i.e. with 2% sunflower and 2% linseed oils and so having slightly higher digestible energy contents (11.4. MJ/kg) than the C feed. In three oil-rich diets, only synthetic (S) vitamin E was used at 60, 150 or 300. mg/kg concentration (diet 60-S, 150-S or 300-S, respectively). In two oil-rich diets, 60. mg/kg synthetic plus 90. mg/kg or 240. mg/kg natural (N) vitamin E (a fatty acid distillate, i.e. d-α-tocopherol) were used to reach the 150. mg/kg (diet 150-SN) or 300. mg/kg (diet 300-SN) level of added vitamin E contents. In each group, 11 litters of 7 to 9 kits were studied in the pre-weaning period from 21 to 35. days and post-weaning to harvest at 84. days (n = 46-50). Litter and doe performance were poorer in the 300-SN rabbits than with lower levels of vitamin E. Compared to the C rabbits, the 35-84-day mortality was significantly higher only in the 60-S rabbits. The 84-day final weight of the 300-S and 300-SN rabbits was higher than the controls (2745 and 2733 vs 2594. g, P=0.049). The 35-84-day feed conversion of the C rabbits was poorer than any other rabbits (3.3 vs 3.0-3.1, P=0.001). Carcass traits were assessed with sub-samples of 15 rabbits per group and were differently affected by both the level and origin of added vitamin E. Chilled and reference carcass weights (P=0.001) and dressing out percentages (P=0.001) were higher in the 60-S and 150-S than in the C, 300-S and 150-SN rabbits. Considering all traits studied, the 150. mg/kg synthetic vitamin E dietary addition was best for maximising production. However, the effects on meat quality and shelf-life should also be considered to give correct practical advices. Our results confirm the importance of both the level and source of vitamin E when it is used as a dietary additive in oil-enriched diets. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source


Eiben Cs.,Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition ATK | Vegi B.,Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition ATK | Virag Gy.,Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition ATK | Godor-Surmann K.,Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition ATK | And 4 more authors.
Livestock Science | Year: 2010

As part of an experiment aiming to modify the meat fatty acid profile, this work studied the growth and carcass traits as affected by various dietary ratios of sunflower oil and linseed oil. A diet without added oil served as a control (C). Four other diets were equally 4% oil-enriched but they differed in the incorporation ratios of sunflower oil (S) to linseed oil (L), i.e. 4% S to 0% L (diet 4%S), 3% S to 1% L (diet 3:1%SL), 2% S to 2% L (diet 2:2%SL) and 0% S to 4% L (diet 4%L). The oil-rich diets had slightly higher digestible energy contents (11.4 vs 10.6 MJ/kg) than the C feed. In each group 10 litters of 7 to 9 Pannon White kits per litter were studied in the pre-weaning period from 21 to 35 days old. Growth and slaughter traits were assessed with 50 and 30 rabbits per group, respectively. No significant effects of diets were found on litter and doe performances. The only significant differences in growth performance of the C, 4%S, 3:1%SL, 2:2%SL and 4%L rabbits were for the 35-49 day feed intake (88, 86, 84, 84 and 83 g per day, respectively, P = 0.046), the 35-84 day growth rate (36, 38, 37, 35 and 37 g/day, P = 0.034) and the 84-day body weight (2608, 2703, 2664, 2565 and 2628 g, respectively, P = 0.022). There were several significant differences in carcass traits including the weight of reference carcass (1357, 1391, 1388, 1380 and 1369 g, respectively, P = 0.004) and left longisimus dorsi meat (78, 79, 81, 81 and 76 g, respectively, P = 0.046) of rabbits. The diets had major effects on the L*, a* and b* colour values (lightness, redness and yellowness) of meat and fat. Carcass colour of the C and 4%S rabbits was closer and the 4%L rabbits was further from the European consumer's preference of light coloured, less red and slightly yellow rabbit meat. Our result reveals the importance of age and body weight at slaughter. Taking the growth and slaughter performances and, the recent belief of human health benefits from lower n- 6/n- 3 FAs dietary ratios into account, the 2:2%SL diet seems most appropriate if the interests of the raisers, meat processors and buyers are considered equally. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Keonouchanh S.,National of Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute NAFRI | Egerszegi I.,Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition ATK | Ratky J.,Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition ATK | Bounthong B.,National of Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute NAFRI | And 2 more authors.
Archiv fur Tierzucht | Year: 2011

Pig production continues to be an important livelihood activity in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) which base on traditional methods. However, it is increasingly affected by social and market pressures. More than 80 % of pig herds are native breeds and belong to smallholders with combined keeping systems. Based on a national field survey, the native pigs have been characterized and classified in four phenotypes. The native pig types and their local distribution are described. Most of them have short ears, black colour and potbelly. Their production performance, i.e. growth rates and daily weight gain is lower and the carcass fat considerably higher than that of exotic (i.e. in Lao terms "modern, intensive") breeds. However, they require lower inputs and have excellent adaptation traits. © Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, Dummerstorf, Germany. Source


Zsolnai A.,Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition ATK | Toth G.,Agricultural Biotechnology Center | Molnar J.,BIOMI Kft | Steger V.,Agricultural Biotechnology Center | And 14 more authors.
Archiv Tierzucht | Year: 2013

The whole genome of Mangalica animals has been screened on the Illumina porcine chip giving the possibility (1) to replace the previously applied ten microsatellite markers by nine SNP loci to classify the Blond, Swallow-Belly and Red Mangalica individuals into three different breed groups (P>0.95); (2) to propose 54 SNP loci for parentage testing in Mangalica pigs where the exclusion probability is 0.999115 if one parent is known and the probability of identity is 1.54×10-23. © 2013 by the authors; licensee Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology (FBN), Dummerstorf, Germany. Source

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