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Wortsman X.,Institute for Diagnostic Imaging and Research of the Skin and Soft Tissues | Claveria P.,University of Chile | Valenzuela F.,University of Chile | Molina M.T.,University of Chile | Wortsman J.,University of Illinois at Springfield
Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine | Year: 2014

Objectives-The purpose of this study was to assess the sonographic morphology of the clinical and subclinical pathology of facial acne vulgaris. Methods-We studied patients with facial acne vulgaris diagnosed by certified dermatologists, and using a standardized protocol for sonographic examinations, we sequentially described the sonographic pathomorphologic characteristics. Lesions of particular interest to the referring clinician were also analyzed separately. Additionally, acne involvement was staged clinically and sonographically (SOS-Acne) using morphologic definitions of the relevant lesions and predefined scoring systems for gradation of the severity of acne lesions. Results-A total of 245 acne lesions in 20 consecutive patients were studied. Sonographic abnormalities consisted of pseudocysts, folliculitis, fistulas, and calcinosis. Most conditions were subclinical and mostly due to lesion extensions deep into the dermis and hypodermis (52% of pseudocysts and 68% of fistulas). The statistical concordance between acne severity scores assigned by two separate clinicians was strong (?= 0.8020), but the corresponding sonographic scores generally showed more severe and clinically occult involvement. Conclusions-Facial acne vulgaris often involves deeper tissues, beyond the reach of the spatially restricted clinical examination; these subclinical conditions can be detected and defined with sonography. Additionally, acne vulgaris is amenable to sonographic scoring. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

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