Research Center y Desarrollo Del Alimento Funcional

Granada, Spain

Research Center y Desarrollo Del Alimento Funcional

Granada, Spain
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Gomez-Caravaca A.M.,University of Bologna | Gomez-Caravaca A.M.,University of Granada | Segura-Carretero A.,University of Granada | Segura-Carretero A.,Research Center y Desarrollo Del Alimento Funcional | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

A new liquid chromatography methodology coupled to a diode array detector and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed for the simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds and saponins in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd). This method has allowed the simultaneous determination of these two families of compounds with the same analytical method for the first time. A fused-core column C18 has been used, and the analysis has been performed in less than 27 min. Both chromatographic and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry parameters have been optimized to improve the sensitivity and to maximize the number of compounds detected. A validation of the method has also been carried out, and free and bound polar fractions of quinoa have been studied. Twenty-five compounds have been tentatively identified and quantified in the free polar fraction, while five compounds have been tentatively identified and quantified in the bound polar fraction. It is important to highlight that 1-O-galloyl-β-d-glucoside, acacetin, protocatechuic acid 4-O-glucoside, penstebioside, ethyl-m-digallate, (epi)-gallocatechin, and canthoside have been tentatively identified for the first time in quinoa. Free phenolic compounds have been found to be in the range of 2.746-3.803 g/kg of quinoa, while bound phenolic compounds were present in a concentration that varies from 0.139 and 0.164 g/kg. Indeed, saponins have been found to be in a concentration that ranged from 5.6 to 7.5% of the total composition of whole quinoa flour. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Almaraz-Abarca N.,National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico | Rivera-Rodriguez D.M.,National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico | Arraez-Roman D.,University of Granada | Arraez-Roman D.,Research Center y Desarrollo del Alimento Funcional | And 5 more authors.
Acta Botanica Mexicana | Year: 2013

The variability of the pollen phenol composition of 32 populations of Zea mays subsp. mexicana, Zea mays subsp. parviglumis, Zea mays subsp. mays, Zea diploperennis, Zea perennis, and Zea luxurians from Mexico and Guatemala were analyzed. The phenol profiles were assessed by HPLC-DAD, and UPLC-TOF-MS. A total of 23 phenolics (four phenolic acids, 16 flavonols, and three dihydroflavonoids) were found. Quercetin glycosides (seven derivatives besides the quercetin aglycone itself) were the predominant compounds in the pollen of all analyzed species and subspecies. The major compound in all the samples, including the pollen of maize, was identified as quercetin-3,3'-O-diglucoside. The pollen of all the species and subspecies of Zea examined showed very similar patterns of accumulated phenols; however, variation in the minor compounds (phenolic acids and dihydroflavonoids) allowed to discern some inter- and intraspecific variations, although the split of Zea in the sections Luxuriantes and Zea was not clearly supported. The low level of variability of the pollen phenol profiles throughout the genus Zea supports the proposal that maize and some teosintes are conspecific groups, and indicates that the pollen phenol composition is highly conserved in the different taxa of Zea.


Valli V.,University of Bologna | Gomez-Caravaca A.M.,University of Granada | Gomez-Caravaca A.M.,Research Center y Desarrollo Del Alimento Funcional | Di Nunzio M.,University of Bologna | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2012

Molasses, the main byproduct of sugar production, is a well-known source of antioxidants. In this study sugar cane molasses (SCM) and sugar beet molasses (SBM) were investigated for their phenolic profile and in vitro antioxidant capacity and for their protective effect in human HepG2 cells submitted to oxidative stress. According to its higher phenolic concentration and antioxidant capacity in vitro, SCM exhibited an effective protection in cells, comparable to or even greater than that of α-tocopherol. Data herein reported emphasize the potential health effects of molasses and the possibility of using byproducts for their antioxidant activity. This is particularly important for consumers in developing countries, as it highlights the importance of consuming a low-price, yet very nutritious, commodity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Verardo V.,University of Bologna | Gomez-Caravaca A.M.,University of Bologna | Gomez-Caravaca A.M.,University of Granada | Segura-Carretero A.,University of Granada | And 4 more authors.
Electrophoresis | Year: 2011

A sensitive CE-ESI-MS analytical method for the identification of buckwheat antioxidants has been developed. CE and ESI-TOF parameters (e.g. buffer composition and pH, sheath liquid composition, sheath liquid and gas flow rates, electrospray voltage) were optimized to obtain an optimal analytical separation and identification. The results confirmed the presence of phenolic acids, procyanidins and galloylated propelargonidins. The identification of swertiamacroside and 2-hydroxy-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosil-benzoic acid, found for the first time in our previous work, has been confirmed. Furthermore, 5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavan and dihydroxy-trimethoxyisoflavan have also been tentatively identified for the first time in buckwheat. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

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