Research Center Tibaitata

Mosquera, Colombia

Research Center Tibaitata

Mosquera, Colombia
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Rodriguez-Castano G.P.,University of La Sabana | Caro-Quintero A.,Research Center Tibaitata | Reyes A.,University of Los Andes, Colombia | Reyes A.,University of Washington | Lizcano F.,University of La Sabana
Frontiers in Genetics | Year: 2017

The "westernization" of global eating and lifestyle habits is associated with the growing rate of chronic diseases, mainly cardiovascular diseases, cancer, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and respiratory diseases. The primary prevention approach is to make nutritional and behavioral changes, however, there is another important determinant of our health that only recently has been considered and is the presence of beneficial microorganisms and their products in our gastrointestinal tract. Microorganisms living in our body can alter the fate of food, drugs, hormones, and xenobiotics, and recent studies point to the use of microorganisms that can counteract the harmful effects of certain compounds introduced or produced endogenously in our body. This review considers the effects of the western lifestyle on adiposity, glucose metabolism, oxidative markers and inflammation profile, emphasizes on the studies that have investigated bacterial strains and products of their metabolism that are beneficial under this lifestyle, and examines the screening strategies that recent studies are using to select the most promising probiotic isolates. In addition, we consider the relevance of studying the microbiota of metabolically healthy people under a western lifestyle for the understanding of the key components that delay the development of chronic diseases. © 2017 Rodriguez-Castaño, Caro-Quintero, Reyes and Lizcano.


Rincon D.F.,Research Center Tibaitata | Rincon D.F.,Ohio State University | Canas L.A.,Ohio State University | Hoy C.W.,Ohio State University
Theoretical Ecology | Year: 2017

Extrapolation of predator functional responses from laboratory observations to the field is often necessary to predict predation rates and predator-prey dynamics at spatial and temporal scales that are difficult to observe directly. We use a spatially explicit individual-based model to explore mechanisms behind changes in functional responses when the scale of observation is increased. Model parameters were estimated from a predator-prey system consisting of the predator Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) on tomato plants. The model explicitly incorporates prey and predator distributions within single plants, the search behavior of predators within plants, and the functional response to prey at the smallest scale of interaction (within leaflets) observed in the laboratory. Validation revealed that the model is useful in scaling up from laboratory observations to predation in whole tomato plants of varying sizes. Comparing predicted predation at the leaflet scale, as observed in laboratory experiments, with predicted predation on whole plants revealed that the predator functional response switches from type II within leaflets to type III within whole plants. We found that the magnitude of predation rates and the type of functional response at the whole plant scale are modulated by (1) the degree of alignment between predator and prey distributions and (2) predator foraging behavior, particularly the effect of area-concentrated search within plants when prey population density is relatively low. The experimental and modeling techniques we present could be applied to other systems in which active predators prey upon sessile or slow-moving species. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht


PubMed | Research Center Tibaitata and U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genome announcements | Year: 2015

Salmonella enterica is a pathogen of significant public health importance that is frequently associated with foodborne illness. We report the whole-genome sequences of four multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B and Heidelberg strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, -lactams, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and trimethoprim.


PubMed | Research Center Caribia, Research Center Tibaitata and U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genome announcements | Year: 2016

Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds.


PubMed | Instituto Nacional Of Salud, Research Center Tibaitata and U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genome announcements | Year: 2016

Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, -lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines.


PubMed | Research Center Tibaitata, U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information and Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario ICA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genome announcements | Year: 2016

Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacterjejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline.


PubMed | Research Center Caribia, Research Center Tibaitata and U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genome announcements | Year: 2015

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds.


Cuartas P.E.,Research Center Tibaitata | Barrera G.P.,Research Center Tibaitata | Belaich M.N.,National University of Quilmes | Barreto E.,National University of Colombia | And 2 more authors.
Viruses | Year: 2015

Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a major pest in maize crops in Colombia, and affects several regions in America. A granulovirus isolated from S. frugiperda (SfGV VG008) has potential as an enhancer of insecticidal activity of previously described nucleopolyhedrovirus from the same insect species (SfMNPV). The SfGV VG008 genome was sequenced and analyzed showing circular double stranded DNA of 140,913 bp encoding 146 putative ORFs that include 37 Baculoviridae core genes, 88 shared with betabaculoviruses, two shared only with betabaculoviruses from Noctuide insects, two shared with alphabaculoviruses, three copies of own genes (paralogs) and the other 14 corresponding to unique genes without representation in the other baculovirus species. Particularly, the genome encodes for important virulence factors such as 4 chitinases and 2 enhancins. The sequence analysis revealed the existence of eight homologous regions (hrs) and also suggests processes of gene acquisition by horizontal transfer including the SfGV VG008 ORFs 046/047 (paralogs), 059, 089 and 099. The bioinformatics evidence indicates that the genome donors of mentioned genes could be alpha- and/or betabaculovirus species. The previous reported ability of SfGV VG008 to naturally co-infect the same host with other virus show a possible mechanism to capture genes and thus improve its fitness. © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


PubMed | National University of Quilmes, Research Center Tibaitata and Fundacion Institute Inmunologia Of Colombia Fidic
Type: | Journal: BMC genomics | Year: 2015

Baculoviruses are insect-associated viruses carrying large, circular double-stranded-DNA genomes with significant biotechnological applications such as biological pest control, recombinant protein production, gene delivery in mammals and as a model of DNA genome evolution. These pathogens infect insects from the orders Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera and Diptera, and have high species diversity which is expressed in their diverse biological properties including morphology, virulence or pathogenicity. Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), the fall armyworm, represents a significant pest for agriculture in America; it is a host for baculoviruses such as the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) (Colombia strain, genotype A) having been classified as a Group II alphabaculovirus making it a very attractive target for bioinsecticidal use.Genome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed that SfMNPV ColA has 145 ORFs, 2 of which were not present in the other sequenced genotypes of the virus (SfMNPV-NicB, SfMNPV-NicG, SfMNPV-19 and SfMNPV-3AP2). An in-depth bioinformatics study showed that ORF023 and ORF024 were acquired by a recent homologous recombination process between Spodoptera frugiperda and Spodoptera litura (the Oriental leafworm moth) nucleopolyhedroviruses. Auxiliary genes are numerous in the affected locus which has a homologous region (hr3), a repetitive sequence associated with genome replication which became lost in SfColA along with 1 ORF. Besides, the mRNAs associated with two acquired genes appeared in the virus life-cycle during the larval stage. Predictive studies concerning the theoretical proteins identified that ORF023 protein would be a phosphatase involved in DNA repair and that the ORF024 protein would be a membrane polypeptide associated with cell transport.The SfColA genome was thus revealed to be a natural recombinant virus showing evidence of recent horizontal gene transfer between different baculovirus species occurring in nature. This feature could be the cause of its high insecticidal power and therefore SfColA becomes a great candidate for bioinsecticide formulations.


Rincon D.F.,Ohio State University | Rincon D.F.,Research Center Tibaitata | Canas L.A.,Ohio State University | Hoy C.W.,Ohio State University
Biological Control | Year: 2016

Predictive models developed to provide recommendations about release rates and application methods for augmentative biological control often assume a constant probability of encounter between prey and predators within plants. We tested the assumed uniform probability of encounter between the coccinellid predator Delphastus catalinae and nymphs of the sweetpotato whitefly (SWF), Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), on tomato plants. We hypothesized that D. catalinae non-random search patterns would result in a spatially non-uniform intra-plant probability of predator-prey interaction that ultimately affects predation rates. Tomato plants infested with a range of 14-50 SWF adult male-female pairs were placed individually in cages and D. catalinae individuals marked with different colors were released on them. The number of SWF nymphs before and after predator release and the predator visit frequency on each leaf and leaflet were recorded. We found that the distribution of predator visits and prey mortality is concentrated towards the mid and mid-lower region of the plant canopy and followed a different within-plant distribution than that of the SWF. The resulting non-uniform probability of prey encounter presumably affected the magnitude of predation rates and the shape of the functional response at the intra-plant scale. Results show that the assumption of uniform probability of encounter among leaves within a plant could be misleading at least for predictive models of the tomato-SWF- D. catalinae system, and that spatially explicit or individual-based modeling approaches could improve prediction accuracy. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

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