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Mateus-Rodriguez J.,Agropecuaria Research Center Tibaitata | De Haan S.,International Potato Center | Barker I.,International Potato Center | Chuquillanqui C.,International Potato Center | Rodriguez-Delfin A.,Agrarian National University
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2012

The International Potato Center (CIP) has recently developed and promoted mini-tuber production based on a novel, rustic and publically available aeroponics system. The technology is proposed as an alternative to conventional systems of prebasic seed (mini-tuber) production that use soil-based substrates requiring bromide for sterilization. Previous research has shown that the aeroponics technology is potentially efficient for specific potato cultivars. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate plant growth and mini-tuber production of three potato cultivars grown in an aeroponics system under greenhouse conditions at CIP's experimental station in La Molina, Lima (Peru). The study was conducted between August 2008 and April 2009. A randomized complete block design with three replications was used, where the cultivars were the treatments. Measurements on tuberization, senescence, plant height and yield were recorded after transplanting. Significant differences between treatments were encountered for days till tuberization, plant height, and tuber yield. The highest number of tubers per plant was registered for the 'Chucmarina' cultivar, followed by 'Serranita' and 'Yana Imilla' with 71.7, 56.2 and 30.6 mini-tubers per plant, respectively. Tuber yield per plant ranged from 197.6 to 860.2 g per plant. Average tuber weight ranged from 6.3 to 12.1 g per minituber. Harvests were conducted every 20 days. An ample variability between cultivars exists as regards their response and production in an aeroponics system under uniform conditions. Results showed that the aeroponics system is a viable technological alternative for the potato mini-tuber production component within a potato tuber seed system. Source

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