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Wilson J.M.,The University of Tampa | Duncan N.M.,The University of Tampa | Marin P.J.,Miguel de Cervantes European University | Marin P.J.,Research Center on Physical Disability | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2013

Wilson, JM, Duncan, NM, Marin, PJ, Brown, LE, Loenneke, JP, Wilson, SMC, Jo, E, Lowery, RP, and Ugrinowitsch, C. Metaanalysis of postactivation potentiation and power: Effects of conditioning activity, volume, gender, rest periods, and training status. J Strength Cond Res 27(3): 854-859, 2013-There is no clear agreement regarding the ideal combination of factors needed to optimize postactivation potentiation (PAP) after a conditioning activity. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of training status, volume, rest period length, conditioning activity, and gender on power augmentation due to PAP. A total of 141 effect sizes (ESs) for muscular power were obtained from a total of 32 primary studies, which met our criteria of investigating the effects of a heavy preconditioning activity on power in randomized human trials. The mean overall ES for muscle power was 0.38 after a conditioning activity (p < 0.05). Significant differences were found between moderate intensity (60-84%) 1.06 and heavy intensity (>85%) 0.31 (p < 0.05). There were overall significant differences found between single sets 0.24 and multiple sets 0.66 (p < 0.05). Rest periods of 7-10 minutes (0.7) after a conditioning activity resulted in greater ES than 3-7 minutes (0.54), which was greater than rest periods of >10 minutes (0.02) (p < 0.05). Significant differences were found between untrained 0.14 and athletes 0.81 and between trained 0.29 and athletes. The primary findings of this study were that a conditioning activity augmented power output, and these effects increased with training experience, but did not differ significantly between genders. Moreover, potentiation was optimal after multiple (vs. single) sets, performed at moderate intensities, and using moderate rest periods lengths (7-10 minutes). © 2013 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Source


Garatachea N.,University of Zaragoza | Marin P.J.,Miguel de Cervantes European University | Marin P.J.,Research Center on Physical Disability | Lucia A.,European University at Madrid | Lucia A.,Institute Investigacion i12
Ageing Research Reviews | Year: 2013

The ACE I/D polymorphism has been associated with longevity, although not consistently. The objective of this study was to detect the possible unequal distribution of the alleles and genotypes of this polymorphism among centenarians and younger segments of the population. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype and allele frequencies between centenarians and younger controls. The association of ACE I/D polymorphism with exceptional longevity was analyzed in a total of 1803 centenarians and 10,484 controls using the chi-square test with the Yates correction. We conducted combined analyses for all ethnic groups studied in the literature (Caucasian, Chinese and Korean) as well as for Caucasians only. The DD genotype (odds ratio (OR): 1.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.54), P=. 0.032) and the D-allele were more frequent in Caucasian centenarians compared with their younger controls (OR: 1.16 (95% CI: 1.05-1.28), P<. 0.001). Similar findings were obtained when all ethnic origin groups were included in the analyses, with no evidence of publication bias or heterogeneity (. P>. 0.05). The present meta-analysis indicates that the ACE D-allele and the DD genotype might confer a modest, albeit significant advantage to reach exceptional longevity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. Source


Wilson J.M.,The University of Tampa | Marin P.J.,Miguel de Cervantes European University | Marin P.J.,Research Center on Physical Disability | Rhea M.R.,A.T. Still University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2012

The primary objective of this investigation was to identify which components of endurance training (e.g., modality, duration, frequency) are detrimental to resistance training outcomes. A meta-analysis of 21 studies was performed with a total of 422 effect sizes (ESs). Criteria for the study included were (a) compare strength training alone to strength plus endurance training (concurrent) or to compare combinations of concurrent training; (b) the outcome measures include at least one measure of strength, power, or hypertrophy; and (c) the data necessary to calculate ESs must be included or available. The mean ES for hypertrophy for strength training was 1.23; for endurance training, it was 0.27; and for concurrent training, it was 0.85, with strength and concurrent training being significantly greater than endurance training only. The mean ES for strength development for strength training was 1.76; for endurance training, it was 0.78; and for concurrent training, it was 1.44. Strength and concurrent training was significantly greater than endurance training. The mean ES for power development for strength training only was 0.91; for endurance training, it was 0.11; and for concurrent training, it was 0.55. Significant differences were found between all the 3 groups. For moderator variables, resistance training concurrently with running, but not cycling, resulted in significant decrements in both hypertrophy and strength. Correlational analysis identified significant negative relationships between frequency (20.26 to 20.35) and duration (20.29 to 20.75) of endurance training for hypertrophy, strength, and power. Significant relationships (p < 0.05) between ES for decreased body fat and % maximal heart rate (r = 20.60) were also found. Our results indicate that interference effects of endurance training are a factor of the modality, frequency, and duration of the endurance training selected. © 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Source


Marin P.J.,Miguel de Cervantes European University | Marin P.J.,Research Center on Physical Disability | Santos-Lozano A.,University of Leon | Santin-Medeiros F.,University of Leon | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology | Year: 2011

The aim of this study was to investigate surface electromyographic activity (sEMG) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during semi-squat exercise on vibration platform compared with semi-squat exercise performed on a Smith machine. Twenty-three recreationally active students (15 males and 8 females) were exposed to six different loads in one of both exercise modes: vibration or Smith machine. The subject performed a squat in six experimental conditions; the load differed per experimental condition. For each subject the exercise mode (n=2) and the different loads per mode (n=6) were assigned in a random order to check the influence of vibration magnitude (acceleration: ms-2) as well as weight (kg) on sEMG and RPE. Two-way ANOVA for RPE, lumbar and lower-body sEMG revealed a significant weight main effect (P<0.01) and a significant acceleration main effect (P<0.01). The results from this study demonstrate that the training stimulus resulting from an isometric semi-squat exercise on a vibration platform (acceleration: from 12 to 89ms-2) is similar to the training stimulus of an isometric semi-squat exercise on Smith machine (weight: from 20 to 70kg) according to lower-body sEMG and RPE. However, the impact of semi-squat on vibration platform exercise for lumbar muscle is relatively small compared with semi-squat on Smith machine. © 2011. Source


Marin P.J.,Miguel de Cervantes European University | Marin P.J.,Research Center on Physical Disability | Santos-Lozano A.,University of Zaragoza | Santin-Medeiros F.,University of Zaragoza | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology | Year: 2012

The current study examined the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on upper and lower body muscle activity during static muscle contractions (squat and bicep curls). The use of WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform and a soft surface mat were also evaluated. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured for the medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps brachii (BB) muscles in fourteen healthy older adults (74.8±4.5years; mean±SD) with a WBV stimulus at an acceleration of 40ms -2 (30Hz High, 2.5mm or 46Hz Low, 1.1mm). WBV increased lower body (VL and MG) sEMG vs baseline (no WBV) though this was decreased with the use of the soft mat. The addition of the bicep curl with hand straps had no effect on lower body sEMG. WBV also increased BB sEMG vs baseline which was further increased when using the hand straps. There was no upper body effect of the soft mat. This study demonstrates WBV increases both lower and upper body muscle activity in healthy older adults. Moreover, WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform or a soft surface mat may be used to alter exercise intensity. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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