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Yang H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Yang H.,Nanjing University | Yang H.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Yuan T.,Nanjing Forestry University | And 4 more authors.
Forests | Year: 2016

State-owned forestry enterprises are important elements of the forestry economy in China. The operational efficiency of such enterprises depends on technological progress and other input factors. Total factor productivity (TFP) is an important means to evaluate the efficiency of technical elements. The growth of production efficiency can be classified into efficiency variation and technical variation. The TFP of 135 key state-owned forestry enterprises in the northeast, southwest, and northwest regions of China in 2001-2011 was measured through Malmquist-data envelopment analysis. The technological progress of the state-owned forestry enterprises positively affected TFP variation, but technical efficiency only slightly increased and scale efficiency even negatively affected TFP variation. The average growth rate of TFP in the northwest region is higher than those in the northeast and southwest regions. The Western Development Program of China increasingly contributes to the economic development of western areas. The increasing investment of the government in science and technology accelerates the development of forestry economy in China. © 2016 by the authors. Source


Yang H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Yang H.,Nanjing University | Yang H.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Zhang X.,Nanjing Forestry University | Zhang X.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration
Sustainability (Switzerland) | Year: 2016

The trade of harvested wood products (HWPs) and their feedstock increasingly affects the dynamics of the complete national HWP carbon pool ignored by the Production Approach (PA), the current universal method, proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Existing research also overlooks the inherent factors that lead to the non-objectiveness of PA that affects the potential carbon trade and the sustainable use of forestry resources. This study aimed to investigate such inherent factors through a deductive derivation of PA and the Stock-Change Approach (SCA), based on which an empirical study on China was conducted to rethink the objectiveness of PA in the complete national HWP carbon pool. The deductive derivation indicated that the inherent factors rely on the balance between coefficients that describe the relationship between HWP trade and production and the relationship between the corresponding feedstock trade and production. The empirical study further illustrated that the dynamics of balance between coefficients negatively influence the objectiveness of PA. The absolute objectiveness of this approach was constantly weakened in the past 55 years and may potentially occur yet again in the future despite an improvement in its annual relative objectiveness. © 2016 by the authors. Source


Niu L.,Nanjing Forestry University | Niu L.,Huangshan University | Ren H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Ren H.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Environmental Technology and Knowledge Transfer | Year: 2010

According to the co-integration theory and the Granger causality test, this paper empirically analyzed the relationship between China's imports of forest products and area of forestry bio-disasters. Studies showed that, there is a long-term stable equilibrium relationship between China's imports of forest products and forestry bio-disasters, while there is a one-way Granger causality relationship between them, when China's forestry bio-disasters deviate from the equilibrium of forest product imports in a short term, it will return to the equilibrium at the rate of 35%, so it is not very realistic to change China's dependence on imports of forest products. Source


Ji C.,Nanjing Forestry University | Ji C.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Yang H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Yang H.,Nanjing University | And 5 more authors.
International Forestry Review | Year: 2013

The storage of carbon in harvested wood products (HWP) is an important forestry issue in the United Nations Framework on Climate Change Convention. Given that China is a large HWP-trading country, studies on carbon storage and flow of HWP trade are important to help mitigate carbon concentrations in this country. Total carbon storage has continuously increased, and the accumulated carbon storage of HWP in use is greater than that from wood harvested in China. The average annual changes in carbon stock from 1961 to 2011 based on stock-change, production, and atmospheric-flow approaches were 10.6, 7.6, and 2.6 Mt C per year, respectively. Carbon flow in wood product imports has increased constantly, thereby increasing carbon stocks via a stock-change approach. Based on atmospheric-flow approach, large imports of primary wood materials increased the carbon emissions. As a result, the trade of HWP has made HWP in China become a "carbon source.". Source


Nie Y.,Nanjing Forestry University | Nie Y.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Ji C.,Nanjing Forestry University | Ji C.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | And 2 more authors.
Forest Policy and Economics | Year: 2010

Since 1998 China has been the world's second major timber importing country, which raised a concern that China may represent a menace to the world's forest resources. In this study, an ecological footprint model is used to measure the forest impact embodied by Chinese log imports from 1995 to 2007. Special attention is given to the ratio of the forest ecological footprint for Chinese log import to the biocapacity of the import origins. Chinese log demand continues to rely more on domestic supplies. Despite that the log import has increased the forest ecological footprint from Europe, those from Oceania and Asia, and Africa were less affected. From the perspective of ecological footprint we find little evidence that Chinese log imports present any serious menace to the world's forest resources. Crown Copyright © 2009. Source

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