Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration

Nanjing, China

Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration

Nanjing, China
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Geng A.,Nanjing Forestry University | Geng A.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Yang H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Yang H.,Nanjing University | And 3 more authors.
Forest Policy and Economics | Year: 2017

Global forests have the potential to significantly increase or reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration. Harvested wood products (HWP) are an important part of the forest-atmosphere carbon cycle. On the one hand, HWP can retain the carbon for various periods of time, depending on the end uses. On the other hand, using HWP in place of more GHG-intensive materials and using wood bioenergy to substitute for fossil fuels result in reduced fossil fuel emissions. However, critical methodological differences exist in existing literature in assessing the GHG effects of HWP and wood bioenergy substitution, and large diversity in system boundary, substitution scenario, study period, and reference baseline results in large difference in reported GHG effects of wood substitution. In the present study, we conducted a comprehensive literature review to (a) clarify the methodological issues in GHG effects assessments of HWP and wood bioenergy substitution, (b) summarize and compare the reported GHG effects, and (c) identify knowledge gaps to inform future research. We support the conclusion that to accurately assess the GHG effects, HWP and wood bioenergy life-cycle carbon analysis needs to be integrated with forest carbon balance analysis. Substituting HWP for non-wood materials appears to be more effective in reducing GHG emissions than substituting wood for fossil fuels. The time required to obtain net emission reduction for wood bioenergy in place of fossil fuels can be 0. years, decades or more than a century, depending on forest biomass sources (e.g., harvest residue, standing live trees) and fossil fuels displaced. For HWP used to replace non-wood material, however, the time required to obtain net emission reduction largely remains a future research need. Overall, HWP and wood bioenergy originated from sustainably managed forests can significantly contribute to GHG emissions reduction in the long term. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Zhang X.,Nanjing Forestry University | Zhang X.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Xu B.,China Academy of Forestry | Wang L.,Nanjing Forestry University | And 5 more authors.
Forests | Year: 2016

Illegal logging, with its related trade of illegally harvested timber, is one of the main environmental and economic problems worldwide. Eliminating illegal timber consumption and production are two practical means to reduce illegal logging. However, the problem of determining which of the two means is more economical remains to be analyzed. In this study, an input-output analysis was conducted to evaluate the consumption and production of illegal timber in different countries. The Global Forest Products Model (GFPM) was employed to analyze the effects of eliminating illegal timber consumption and production on the added value of the forest sector at global and national levels. Results indicated that eliminating illegal timber production is more economical than eliminating consumption at the global level. The former is estimated to decrease the added value of the global forest sector only by 3.37% compared to 7.31% by the latter in 2030. Eliminating the production of illegal timber will result in uneven distribution of social wealth in the forest sector, and will pass the cost of reducing illegal logging onto developing countries. Developed countries would gain more added value and market scale than the global average, whereas developing countries would suffer a loss if illegal timber production is eliminated. Hence, developed countries are encouraged to provide financial support to help developing countries reduce illegal logging. © 2016 by the authors.


Yang H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Yang H.,Nanjing University | Yang H.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Yuan T.,Nanjing Forestry University | And 4 more authors.
Forests | Year: 2016

State-owned forestry enterprises are important elements of the forestry economy in China. The operational efficiency of such enterprises depends on technological progress and other input factors. Total factor productivity (TFP) is an important means to evaluate the efficiency of technical elements. The growth of production efficiency can be classified into efficiency variation and technical variation. The TFP of 135 key state-owned forestry enterprises in the northeast, southwest, and northwest regions of China in 2001-2011 was measured through Malmquist-data envelopment analysis. The technological progress of the state-owned forestry enterprises positively affected TFP variation, but technical efficiency only slightly increased and scale efficiency even negatively affected TFP variation. The average growth rate of TFP in the northwest region is higher than those in the northeast and southwest regions. The Western Development Program of China increasingly contributes to the economic development of western areas. The increasing investment of the government in science and technology accelerates the development of forestry economy in China. © 2016 by the authors.


Yang H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Yang H.,Nanjing University | Yang H.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Zhang X.,Nanjing Forestry University | Zhang X.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration
Sustainability (Switzerland) | Year: 2016

The trade of harvested wood products (HWPs) and their feedstock increasingly affects the dynamics of the complete national HWP carbon pool ignored by the Production Approach (PA), the current universal method, proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Existing research also overlooks the inherent factors that lead to the non-objectiveness of PA that affects the potential carbon trade and the sustainable use of forestry resources. This study aimed to investigate such inherent factors through a deductive derivation of PA and the Stock-Change Approach (SCA), based on which an empirical study on China was conducted to rethink the objectiveness of PA in the complete national HWP carbon pool. The deductive derivation indicated that the inherent factors rely on the balance between coefficients that describe the relationship between HWP trade and production and the relationship between the corresponding feedstock trade and production. The empirical study further illustrated that the dynamics of balance between coefficients negatively influence the objectiveness of PA. The absolute objectiveness of this approach was constantly weakened in the past 55 years and may potentially occur yet again in the future despite an improvement in its annual relative objectiveness. © 2016 by the authors.


Ji C.,Nanjing Forestry University | Ji C.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Yang H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Yang H.,Nanjing University | And 5 more authors.
International Forestry Review | Year: 2013

The storage of carbon in harvested wood products (HWP) is an important forestry issue in the United Nations Framework on Climate Change Convention. Given that China is a large HWP-trading country, studies on carbon storage and flow of HWP trade are important to help mitigate carbon concentrations in this country. Total carbon storage has continuously increased, and the accumulated carbon storage of HWP in use is greater than that from wood harvested in China. The average annual changes in carbon stock from 1961 to 2011 based on stock-change, production, and atmospheric-flow approaches were 10.6, 7.6, and 2.6 Mt C per year, respectively. Carbon flow in wood product imports has increased constantly, thereby increasing carbon stocks via a stock-change approach. Based on atmospheric-flow approach, large imports of primary wood materials increased the carbon emissions. As a result, the trade of HWP has made HWP in China become a "carbon source.".


Nie Y.,Nanjing Forestry University | Nie Y.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | Ji C.,Nanjing Forestry University | Ji C.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | And 2 more authors.
Forest Policy and Economics | Year: 2010

Since 1998 China has been the world's second major timber importing country, which raised a concern that China may represent a menace to the world's forest resources. In this study, an ecological footprint model is used to measure the forest impact embodied by Chinese log imports from 1995 to 2007. Special attention is given to the ratio of the forest ecological footprint for Chinese log import to the biocapacity of the import origins. Chinese log demand continues to rely more on domestic supplies. Despite that the log import has increased the forest ecological footprint from Europe, those from Oceania and Asia, and Africa were less affected. From the perspective of ecological footprint we find little evidence that Chinese log imports present any serious menace to the world's forest resources. Crown Copyright © 2009.


Niu L.,Nanjing Forestry University | Niu L.,Huangshan University | Ren H.,Nanjing Forestry University | Ren H.,Research Center for Economics and Trade in Forest Products of the State Forestry Administration | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Environmental Technology and Knowledge Transfer | Year: 2010

According to the co-integration theory and the Granger causality test, this paper empirically analyzed the relationship between China's imports of forest products and area of forestry bio-disasters. Studies showed that, there is a long-term stable equilibrium relationship between China's imports of forest products and forestry bio-disasters, while there is a one-way Granger causality relationship between them, when China's forestry bio-disasters deviate from the equilibrium of forest product imports in a short term, it will return to the equilibrium at the rate of 35%, so it is not very realistic to change China's dependence on imports of forest products.

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