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Hangzhou, China

Research Building

Hangzhou, China
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Tokyo, Japan - Nokia and leading Japanese operator KDDI have conducted a country-first trial simulating future 5G network demands, providing high-speed, one gigabit-per-second connectivity inside an apartment block using Nokia radio technology on the 28GHz band. The trial, conducted between the KDDI Research Building and an apartment approximately 100 meters away, achieved speeds in excess of 1Gbps on the 28GHz band, demonstrating how 5G technology can be used inside apartment blocks to meet demand for wireless ultra-broadband in megacities such as Tokyo, the most densely populated metropolitan area in the world. The trial took place in Fujimino City of Saitama Prefecture and marks the first in a series of 5G collaborations between Nokia and KDDI following the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) last year to develop technologies for a new, faster generation of wireless communications. Akira Matsunaga, Senior Director, Mobile Network Technical Development, KDDI, said: "The speeds achieved in this trial show great potential for us to deliver high-quality services. Working with Nokia, we want to develop the use of technologies that deliver on the promise of 5G to meet our subscribers needs." Jae Won, head of Nokia Japan, added: "This trial is an important milestone both in our collaboration with KDDI and in our development of technology to meet the ever-growing demands of the large populations of megacities. 5G promises to deliver the ultra-low latency, capacity and high speeds for these types of deployment, and this trial is a great example of how it can be applied to transform the entertainment experience as one of the many use cases 5G has to offer." About KDDI KDDI, a comprehensive communications company offering fixed-line and mobile communications services, strives to be a leading company for changing times. For individual customers, KDDI offers its mobile communications (mobile phone) and fixed-line communications (broadband Internet/telephone) services under the brand name au. For business clients, KDDI provides comprehensive Information and Communications services, from Fixed Mobile Convergence (FMC) networks to data centers, applications, and security strategies, which help clients strengthen their businesses. For more information please visit http://www.kddi.com/english About Nokia We create the technology to connect the world. Powered by the research and innovation of Nokia Bell Labs, we serve communications service providers, governments, large enterprises and consumers, with the industry's most complete, end-to-end portfolio of products, services and licensing. From the enabling infrastructure for 5G and the Internet of Things, to emerging applications in virtual reality and digital health, we are shaping the future of technology to transform the human experience. www.nokia.com Media Enquiries Nokia Japan Communications Takanobu Hori Phone: +81 80 5686 4643 E-mail: takanobu.hori@nokia.com


Tokyo, Japan - Nokia and leading Japanese operator KDDI have conducted a country-first trial simulating future 5G network demands, providing high-speed, one gigabit-per-second connectivity inside an apartment block using Nokia radio technology on the 28GHz band. The trial, conducted between the KDDI Research Building and an apartment approximately 100 meters away, achieved speeds in excess of 1Gbps on the 28GHz band, demonstrating how 5G technology can be used inside apartment blocks to meet demand for wireless ultra-broadband in megacities such as Tokyo, the most densely populated metropolitan area in the world. The trial took place in Fujimino City of Saitama Prefecture and marks the first in a series of 5G collaborations between Nokia and KDDI following the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) last year to develop technologies for a new, faster generation of wireless communications. Akira Matsunaga, Senior Director, Mobile Network Technical Development, KDDI, said: "The speeds achieved in this trial show great potential for us to deliver high-quality services. Working with Nokia, we want to develop the use of technologies that deliver on the promise of 5G to meet our subscribers needs." Jae Won, head of Nokia Japan, added: "This trial is an important milestone both in our collaboration with KDDI and in our development of technology to meet the ever-growing demands of the large populations of megacities. 5G promises to deliver the ultra-low latency, capacity and high speeds for these types of deployment, and this trial is a great example of how it can be applied to transform the entertainment experience as one of the many use cases 5G has to offer." About KDDI KDDI, a comprehensive communications company offering fixed-line and mobile communications services, strives to be a leading company for changing times. For individual customers, KDDI offers its mobile communications (mobile phone) and fixed-line communications (broadband Internet/telephone) services under the brand name au. For business clients, KDDI provides comprehensive Information and Communications services, from Fixed Mobile Convergence (FMC) networks to data centers, applications, and security strategies, which help clients strengthen their businesses. For more information please visit http://www.kddi.com/english About Nokia We create the technology to connect the world. Powered by the research and innovation of Nokia Bell Labs, we serve communications service providers, governments, large enterprises and consumers, with the industry's most complete, end-to-end portfolio of products, services and licensing. From the enabling infrastructure for 5G and the Internet of Things, to emerging applications in virtual reality and digital health, we are shaping the future of technology to transform the human experience. www.nokia.com Media Enquiries Nokia Japan Communications Takanobu Hori Phone: +81 80 5686 4643 E-mail: takanobu.hori@nokia.com


Tokyo, Japan - Nokia and leading Japanese operator KDDI have conducted a country-first trial simulating future 5G network demands, providing high-speed, one gigabit-per-second connectivity inside an apartment block using Nokia radio technology on the 28GHz band. The trial, conducted between the KDDI Research Building and an apartment approximately 100 meters away, achieved speeds in excess of 1Gbps on the 28GHz band, demonstrating how 5G technology can be used inside apartment blocks to meet demand for wireless ultra-broadband in megacities such as Tokyo, the most densely populated metropolitan area in the world. The trial took place in Fujimino City of Saitama Prefecture and marks the first in a series of 5G collaborations between Nokia and KDDI following the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) last year to develop technologies for a new, faster generation of wireless communications. Akira Matsunaga, Senior Director, Mobile Network Technical Development, KDDI, said: "The speeds achieved in this trial show great potential for us to deliver high-quality services. Working with Nokia, we want to develop the use of technologies that deliver on the promise of 5G to meet our subscribers needs." Jae Won, head of Nokia Japan, added: "This trial is an important milestone both in our collaboration with KDDI and in our development of technology to meet the ever-growing demands of the large populations of megacities. 5G promises to deliver the ultra-low latency, capacity and high speeds for these types of deployment, and this trial is a great example of how it can be applied to transform the entertainment experience as one of the many use cases 5G has to offer." About KDDI KDDI, a comprehensive communications company offering fixed-line and mobile communications services, strives to be a leading company for changing times. For individual customers, KDDI offers its mobile communications (mobile phone) and fixed-line communications (broadband Internet/telephone) services under the brand name au. For business clients, KDDI provides comprehensive Information and Communications services, from Fixed Mobile Convergence (FMC) networks to data centers, applications, and security strategies, which help clients strengthen their businesses. For more information please visit http://www.kddi.com/english About Nokia We create the technology to connect the world. Powered by the research and innovation of Nokia Bell Labs, we serve communications service providers, governments, large enterprises and consumers, with the industry's most complete, end-to-end portfolio of products, services and licensing. From the enabling infrastructure for 5G and the Internet of Things, to emerging applications in virtual reality and digital health, we are shaping the future of technology to transform the human experience. www.nokia.com Media Enquiries Nokia Japan Communications Takanobu Hori Phone: +81 80 5686 4643 E-mail: takanobu.hori@nokia.com


Tokyo, Japan - Nokia and leading Japanese operator KDDI have conducted a country-first trial simulating future 5G network demands, providing high-speed, one gigabit-per-second connectivity inside an apartment block using Nokia radio technology on the 28GHz band. The trial, conducted between the KDDI Research Building and an apartment approximately 100 meters away, achieved speeds in excess of 1Gbps on the 28GHz band, demonstrating how 5G technology can be used inside apartment blocks to meet demand for wireless ultra-broadband in megacities such as Tokyo, the most densely populated metropolitan area in the world. The trial took place in Fujimino City of Saitama Prefecture and marks the first in a series of 5G collaborations between Nokia and KDDI following the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) last year to develop technologies for a new, faster generation of wireless communications. Akira Matsunaga, Senior Director, Mobile Network Technical Development, KDDI, said: "The speeds achieved in this trial show great potential for us to deliver high-quality services. Working with Nokia, we want to develop the use of technologies that deliver on the promise of 5G to meet our subscribers needs." Jae Won, head of Nokia Japan, added: "This trial is an important milestone both in our collaboration with KDDI and in our development of technology to meet the ever-growing demands of the large populations of megacities. 5G promises to deliver the ultra-low latency, capacity and high speeds for these types of deployment, and this trial is a great example of how it can be applied to transform the entertainment experience as one of the many use cases 5G has to offer." About KDDI KDDI, a comprehensive communications company offering fixed-line and mobile communications services, strives to be a leading company for changing times. For individual customers, KDDI offers its mobile communications (mobile phone) and fixed-line communications (broadband Internet/telephone) services under the brand name au. For business clients, KDDI provides comprehensive Information and Communications services, from Fixed Mobile Convergence (FMC) networks to data centers, applications, and security strategies, which help clients strengthen their businesses. For more information please visit http://www.kddi.com/english About Nokia We create the technology to connect the world. Powered by the research and innovation of Nokia Bell Labs, we serve communications service providers, governments, large enterprises and consumers, with the industry's most complete, end-to-end portfolio of products, services and licensing. From the enabling infrastructure for 5G and the Internet of Things, to emerging applications in virtual reality and digital health, we are shaping the future of technology to transform the human experience. www.nokia.com Media Enquiries Nokia Japan Communications Takanobu Hori Phone: +81 80 5686 4643 E-mail: takanobu.hori@nokia.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Leading neuroscience researchers and scholars from across New York will gather for the inaugural SUNY-CUNY Neuroscience Research Forum on Thursday, February 23, 2017, from 9:30 A.M. to 4:15 P.M. The forum will be held in the D'Ambra Auditorium at the Life Sciences Research Building on the Uptown Campus at the University at Albany. The State University of New York (SUNY) and the City University of New York (CUNY) are home to leading public research universities deeply committed to work that addresses state and global challenges. In service of this mission, the SUNY-CUNY Neuroscience Research Forum, a brainchild of Drs. James Dias, Vice President for Research at UAlbany and Mark Hauber, Interim Vice Provost for Research at CUNY Central, seeks to foster faculty collaborations and research synergies across the state of New York, and to spur multi-investigator, large-scale, and multi-institutional extramural funding pursuits in neuroscience. Prof. Yasmin Hurd, a nationally acclaimed researcher on addiction and related psychiatric disorders from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present the keynote address and discuss her pioneering new research on the transgenerational effects of cannabis on the developing brain. This keynote will be followed by break-out sessions moderated by SUNY and CUNY Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts, and Deans of Research and Science. Specifically, the SUNY-CUNY Neuroscience Research Forum will convene interdisciplinary, thematically-based group discussions, afford opportunities to share research interest along with current and planned endeavors, enable networking and collaborative interactions, and conclude with a plenary session to summarize Forum activities and to discuss future collaborative opportunities in neuroscience research among SUNY, CUNY and other neuroscience colleagues. Alexander N. Cartwright, SUNY Provost, and Executive Vice Chancellor said, "This is such an important endeavor and my sincere thanks go to the SUNY, CUNY and state-wide participants. Together we can make life-changing advances in neuroscience research and discovery that go well beyond what one institution can do alone. This type of collaboration underscores New York State's capacity for leadership in the field." Mark Hauber, Interim Vice Provost for Research at CUNY noted: "Neuroscience by definition is an interdisciplinary field that needs to bring together researchers from diverse fields for success. Focusing on neuroscience as part of ongoing initiatives for SUNY-CUNY collaborations brings our diverse faculty and student talents together to increase extramural funding and high-impact productivity of research at New York State's public university systems." UAlbany Vice President for Research James A. Dias said, "Neuroscience in the 21st century is clearly in the midst of a seismic transformation with an unprecedented focus on multi-investigator, interdisciplinary collaborative research strategies aimed at overcoming some of today's most complex and perplexing scientific challenges. This is why I could not be more pleased that the University at Albany is hosting the first ever SUNY-CUNY Neuroscience Research Forum bringing faculty scholars and scientists together to forge new research collaborations and spark novel extramural funding pursuits in search of the next scientific breakthrough to improve the health and well-being of society." Hosted on the UAlbany campus, one of the four distinguished SUNY University Centers, the SUNY-CUNY Neuroscience Research Forum will be held in the D'Ambra Auditorium of the 194,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art Life Sciences Research Building - home to a number of UAlbany's top neuroscience researchers. The founding members of the SUNY-CUNY Neuroscience Research Forum include the State University of New York, the City University of New York Office of Research, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, SUNY Optometry, and the University at Albany. Both Research Foundations of SUNY and CUNY are participating in this effort. Faculty and industry partners from more than 15 SUNY, CUNY and independent universities and colleges will be participating in the event. SUNY is the largest comprehensive system of higher education in the United States, with 64 college and university campuses located within 30 miles of every home, school, and business in the state. In 2015-16, SUNY served nearly 1.3 million students, including nearly 600,000 in credit-bearing courses and programs and more than 700,000 through continuing education and community outreach programs. For more information, please visit http://www. . The City University of New York is the nation's largest and leading urban public university. Founded in New York City in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, and additional professional and graduate schools. The University serves nearly 275,000 degree-credit students and 218,083 adults, continuing and professional education students. For more information, please visit: http://www. A comprehensive public research university, the University at Albany offers more than 120 undergraduate majors and minors and 125 master's, doctoral, and graduate certificate programs. UAlbany is a leader among all New York State colleges and universities in such diverse fields as atmospheric and environmental sciences, business, criminal justice, emergency preparedness, engineering and applied sciences, informatics, public administration, social welfare, and sociology taught by an extensive roster of faculty experts. It also offers expanded academic and research opportunities for students through an affiliation with Albany Law School. With a curriculum enhanced by 600 study-abroad opportunities, UAlbany launches great careers. For more information on CUNY research, please contact Shante Booker (shante.booker@cuny.edu) or visit: http://www. For more information on SUNY Research, please contact Holly Liapis 518-320-1311 or visit: http://www.


Bailey D.,Incisive Media | Carpenter E.P.,Research Building | Coker A.,Center for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins | Coker S.,Center for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins | And 13 more authors.
Acta Crystallographica Section D: Biological Crystallography | Year: 2012

The analysis reported here describes detailed structural studies of endothiapepsin (the aspartic proteinase from Endothia parasitica), with and without bound inhibitors, and human pepsin 3b. Comparison of multiple crystal structures of members of the aspartic proteinase family has revealed small but significant differences in domain orientation in different crystal forms. In this paper, it is shown that these differences in domain orientation do not necessarily correlate with the presence or absence of bound inhibitors, but appear to stem at least partly from crystal contacts mediated by sulfate ions. However, since the same inherent flexibility of the structure is observed for other enzymes in this family such as human pepsin, the native structure of which is also reported here, the observed domain movements may well have implications for the mechanism of catalysis. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography Printed in Singapore - all rights reserved.


Ford researchers are slated to be embedded at the University of Michigan in a new partnership focused on autonomous driving technology development, in what the company claims is the first ever such arrangement. The partnership will see Ford researchers working directly with, and alongside of, University of Michigan researchers in the same academic building — the North Campus Research Complex (NCRC). Eventually, they will work in a state-of-the-art robotics laboratory on the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus slated to open in 2020. As a reminder, Ford is currently aiming to have “fully autonomous SAE-defined level 4-capable vehicles available for high-volume commercial use in 2021.” The new partnership is part of the effort to achieve that. “Ford engineers and researchers will begin working shoulder-to-shoulder with U-M faculty and students to test and learn about autonomous vehicle technology and innovation,” stated Mark Fields, Ford president and CEO. “We are aiming to show the world what we can achieve when leaders in business and academia work together to make people’s lives better.” The press release provides more: “Ten years into the Ford–University of Michigan Innovation Alliance, the two parties have agreed Ford will lease the fourth floor of the new robotics laboratory. It is an approximately 140,000-square-foot building on Hayward Street, east of the university’s Space Research Building. The planned robotics laboratory will have space where machines walk, fly, drive, and swim. The building will house labs, offices, and classrooms, continuing a tradition of robotics leadership at U-M that includes the creation of MABEL, the world’s fastest-running robot with knees.” It certainly seems like one of the top universities for Ford to partner with in order to be on the cutting edge of autonomous driving. Continuing: “By locating a team of more than 100 employees on campus, Ford benefits from being close to technical leaders as well as facilities, such as Mcity — a one-of-a-kind urban simulation test environment in Ann Arbor. … Today, Ford and U-M also announce professors Matthew Johnson-Roberson and Ram Vasudevan will serve as leaders of a new autonomous vehicle research team comprising graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and researchers. Both professors, who began collaborating with Ford earlier this summer, bring a wealth of autonomous vehicle research experience. Dr Johnson-Roberson is an assistant professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, and has worked in autonomous vehicles since the first DARPA Grand Challenge in 2004. His research focuses on robotic systems perception. Dr Vasudevan is an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering with a background in robotics and next-generation automotive technologies.” Sounds like a serious research team. You can tell that Ford is serious about autonomous driving technology. Too bad it doesn’t seem to be putting the same resources into the development of a long-range electric vehicle. Or maybe it is secretly doing so behind the scenes. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


Latif R.,Research Building | Rejwan Ali M.,James ters Veterans Affairs Medical Center | Mezei M.,Research Building | Davies T.F.,Research Building
Endocrinology | Year: 2015

The TSH receptor (TSHR) has the propensity to form dimers and oligomers. Our data using ectodomain-truncated TSHRs indicated that the predominant interfaces for oligomerization reside in the transmembrane (TM) domain. To map the potentially interacting residues, we first performed in silico studies of the TSHR transmembrane domain using a homology model and using Brownian dynamics (BD). The cluster of dimer conformations obtained from BD analysis indicated that TM1 made contact with TM4 and two residues in TM2 made contact with TM5. To confirm the proximity of these contact residues, we then generated cysteine mutants at all six contact residues predicted by the BD analysis and performed cysteine cross-linking studies. These results showed that the predicted helices in the protomer were indeed involved in proximity interactions. Furthermore, an alternative experimental approach, receptor truncation experiments and LH receptor sequence substitution experiments, identified TM1 harboring a major region involved in TSHR oligomerization, in agreement with the conclusion from the cross-linking studies. Point mutations of the predicted interacting residues did not yield a substantial decrease in oligomerization, unlike the truncation of the TM1, so we concluded that constitutive oligomerization must involve interfaces forming domains of attraction in a cooperative manner that is not dominated by interactions between specific residues.. Copyright © 2015 by the Endocrine Society.


Tong N.,McMaster University | Shmatukha A.,General Electric | Shmatukha A.,Research Building | Asmah P.,General Electric | Stainsby J.,General Electric
Physics in Medicine and Biology | Year: 2010

Various aspects of RF-induced heating of guide wires during their MRI guidance have been investigated in the past. However, the previous works focused on inducing tip heating in either fully immersed or tip-immersed (and otherwise free) wires of impractical lengths in small phantoms. This study simulates real clinical conditions using a product guide wire and a same-length conductive wire partially inserted into a torso-size phantom filled with saline solution. The purpose was to identify potential safety concerns relevant to real clinical applications, as opposed to identifying the worst-case heating scenario. Significant heating occurred at the insertion point, independent of tip heating, with a strong correlation with excitation frequency-dependent imaging parameters. Heat transfer through the wire was also demonstrated to be a safety concern. From these experiments, we have been able to demonstrate additional impacting factors that increase the complexity of safety considerations for the use of conductive guide wires during MR imaging. Safety under a particular set of conditions does not imply safety in all possible conditions that can be encountered during real MRI-guided interventions. © 2010 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.


News Article | September 16, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Volkswagen teases release of EV concept at Paris; production version to be 1st MEB vehicle | Main | 24M and partners awarded $3.5M from ARPA-E to develop ultra-high-energy density batteries with new lithium-metal anodes » Ford and the University of Michigan are teaming up to accelerate autonomous vehicle research and development with a first-time arrangement that embeds Ford researchers and engineers into a new state-of-the-art robotics laboratory on U-M’s Ann Arbor campus. While the new robotics laboratory opens in 2020, by the end of this year Ford will move a dozen researchers into the North Campus Research Complex (NCRC), kicking off the first phase of expanded presence. The announcement is the latest in a series of actions by Ford as it moves toward having fully autonomous SAE-defined level 4-capable vehicles available for high-volume commercial use in 2021. Autonomous vehicles are part of Ford’s expansion to be an auto and a mobility company. Ford will lease the fourth floor of the new robotics laboratory. It is an approximately 140,000-square-foot building on Hayward Street, east of the university’s Space Research Building. The planned robotics laboratory will have space where machines walk, fly, drive and swim. The building will house labs, offices and classrooms, continuing a tradition of robotics leadership at U-M that includes the creation of MABEL, the world’s fastest-running robot with knees. By locating a team of more than 100 employees on campus, Ford benefits from being close to technical leaders as well as facilities, such as Mcity—the urban simulation test environment in Ann Arbor. Ford has been testing autonomous vehicles for more than 10 years, last fall becoming the first automaker to begin testing at Mcity. It also is tripling its fleet of autonomous research vehicles this year—making Ford’s fully autonomous vehicle fleet the largest of all automakers. Ford and U-M also announced that professors Matthew Johnson-Roberson and Ram Vasudevan will serve as leaders of a new autonomous vehicle research team comprising graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and researchers. Both professors, who began collaborating with Ford earlier this summer, bring a wealth of autonomous vehicle research experience. Dr. Johnson-Roberson is an assistant professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, and has worked in autonomous vehicles since the first DARPA Grand Challenge in 2004. His research focuses on robotic systems perception. Dr. Vasudevan is an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering with a background in robotics and next-generation automotive technologies. U-M’s College of Engineering also named Professor Jessy Grizzle as Director of Robotics. Dr. Grizzle also serves as the key liaison between Ford’s autonomous vehicle research program and the College of Engineering. Grizzle’s familiarity with Ford will be of great value as the college and Ford strengthen their bonds. A U-M professor of engineering since 1987, Grizzle has spent nearly two decades as a Ford consultant working on programs such as environmentally friendly emissions, enhanced fuel economy and hybrid-electric vehicles. U-M is one of only a handful of universities to offer master’s and doctoral degrees in robotics, with the Ph.D. program now in its third year. More than 35 faculty members work in the field.

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