Research Area

Rome, Italy

Research Area

Rome, Italy

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

FRANKFURT. Microbes are already used on a wide scale for the production of fuels and base chemicals, but for this most of them have to be "fed" with sugar. However, since sugar-based biotechnology finds itself in competition with food production, it is faced with increasingly fierce criticism. Carbon dioxide has meanwhile become the focus of attention as an alternative raw material for biotechnological processes. Goethe University Frankfurt has now taken charge of a collaborative European project, the aim of which is to advance the development of processes for microbial, CO2-based biotechnology. The project will be funded over the next three years with two million Euro. "This application-oriented work is the logical continuation of our successful endeavours over many years to understand the metabolism of CO2-reducing acetogenic bacteria. We can now start to steer their metabolism in such a way that they produce valuable substances and fuels which are interesting for mankind", says Professor Volker Müller, professor at the Institute of Molecular Biosciences of Goethe University Frankfurt. He is coordinating this transnational project in the framework of the "Industrial Biotechnology" European Research Area Network (ERA-NET), within which the German research groups are financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. This means that Goethe University Frankfurt now plays a pivotal role in the development of a next-generation technology. The special group of acetogenic bacteria converts carbon dioxide (CO2) in a fermentation process which is independent of light and oxygen. The bacteria use hydrogen (H2) or carbon monoxide (CO) or a mix of both (synthesis gas) as a source of energy. However, the bacteria produce very little cellular energy in this metabolic process. This drastically limits the product range possible with gas fermentation, so that at present only acetic acid and ethanol can be manufactured on an industrial scale. That is why the collaborative European project has set itself the objective of genetically modifying suitable acetogenic bacteria in such a way that these energetic barriers can be overcome. Partners in the consortium are Goethe University Frankfurt as well as the universities in Ulm, Göttingen and La Coruna. ArcelorMittal, the largest steel manufacturer worldwide, is the industrial partner. This microbial, CO2-based biotechnology could in future be an environmentally friendly alternative for the reprocessing of industrial waste gases rich in energy and carbon and reduce our dependency on crude oil. The microbial fixation and transformation of CO2 into raw materials produced biologically additionally makes it possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A diagram can be downloaded from: http://www. Acetogenic (acetic acid-producing) bacteria produce acetic acid or ethanol from H2 + CO2 or CO. Energy is released in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) in the process. The synthesis of other products interesting for industry from the intermediate product acetyl-CoA, however, also uses up ATP. The aim of this project is to alter the energy balance of the bacteria by means of genetic modification in such a way that the production of such energy-consuming compounds will also be possible.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

RAFT - Resource Area for Teaching, the leading solution center to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands-on education, announces the launch of our Rock the Ravine Design Challenge kit. This design challenge is aligned with the theme of the 2017 Tech Challenge which reinforces 21st-century skills including creativity, problem solving, teamwork and critical thinking. The Tech Challenge 2017: Rock the Ravine, presented by Dell, marks the 30th anniversary of this signature program of The Tech Museum of Innovation. Students in Grades 4-12 use the engineering design process to solve a real-world problem. Participants spend months collaborating and becoming deeply engaged in the challenge while documenting their progress and designs. The program culminates in a thrilling two-day showcase April 29th-30th, 2017 when teams put their solutions to the test in front of judges. RAFT has collaborated with The Tech Museum of Innovation to create a design challenge kit to help students who are a part of the competition tackle smaller scale problems in preparation for solving the larger problem of the challenge. “We are thrilled that in addition to helping students work up to solving large problems, this collaboration gives younger students the chance to start building engineering skills,” says Abby Longcor, Senior Director of The Tech Challenge. “This partnership helps bring quality engineering education to diverse neighborhoods across our community by working with groups such as libraries and after-school programs.” In addition, our Rock the Ravine kit enables students in grades K-3 to begin exploring the design process to develop solutions to a real world problem. It contains enough building materials for four to six small groups of students to explore engineering concepts and build ravine-crossing solutions. Materials are upcycled from area manufacturers to promote environmentally friendly learning. Students work in teams to design, build and test a model for safely crossing an obstacle - in this case a crevasse - with a set of criteria and constraints. The students also create a story describing how their design will positively impact the intended users and solve a real-world problem. Other skills learned include developing empathy, brainstorming and critical thinking. "The 2017 Tech Challenge Kit, Rock the Ravine, helps younger students develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. The curriculum includes mini lessons to allow students to explore concepts at their own pace before attempting to synthesize those skills in the design challenge. The Rock the Ravine kits are created from 100% up-cycled materials and are a great example of RAFT's commitment to deeper learning through hands on lessons,” says Jason Pittman, RAFT’s Director of Learning. To learn more about our kit go http://www.raftstore.net/techchallenge2017. For more information about the Tech Challenge https://www.thetech.org/thetechchallenge. RAFT – Resource Area For Teaching is a non-profit, resource solution to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands on education to one that inspires the joy and discovery of learning. Founded in 1994, RAFT focuses on providing educators of all types – classroom teachers, after school educators, home-school educators, scout leaders, early care and education professionals – with effective, engaging, affordable hands-on learning resources aligned to national curriculum standards. RAFT, believes the best way to spark a love of learning for the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers, and creators is through hands-on learning. RAFT supports some 11,000 educators in enriching and improving the education of more than 850,000 students young year. ©1994-2016 Resource Area For Teaching. All rights reserved. The RAFT logo and RAFT product names referenced herein are trademarks or service marks of RAFT – Research Area For Teaching. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Brain scientists are using tropical fish to investigate how the spinal cord can be coaxed to repair itself after injury. The European research team has received £1.1 million (€1.3m) to investigate how zebrafish are able to repair and replace damaged nerve cells. Researchers will explore how these mechanisms can be triggered in other animals and human cells. They hope their findings will reveal new therapies that could be tested in patients with neurodegenerative conditions, such as motor neuron disease and multiple sclerosis. Such treatments could also help people with certain types of paralysis. The spinal cord carries vital connections between the brain and muscles called motor neurons, which are crucial for controlling movement of the body. Damage to these fragile nerve cells - either by injury or disease - is permanent and results in irreversible paralysis. Zebrafish have the remarkable ability to repair injured connections and replace damaged motor neurons, enabling them to regain full movement within four weeks after injury. They are also able to repair the specialised sheath that surrounds nerve cells - called myelin - which helps speed up the transmission of nerve impulses that control movement. The team - coordinated by the University of Edinburgh - includes brain experts from the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm), University Hospital Dresden, DFG Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, the Free University of Brussels (VUB) and the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Researchers are developing specialised microscope techniques to monitor the mechanisms of nerve cell repair in action. They hope to identify the molecular signals that instruct stem cells in the zebrafish's spinal cord to produce new motor neurons and stimulate repair of the myelin sheath. These factors will then be examined in further animal studies and laboratory tests on human cells. At the end of the three-year study, the researchers hope to identify potential therapies that can be taken forward into clinical trials involving patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The study is funded by the European Commission through the European Research Area Network for Neuroscience Research (ERA-NET NEURON) and co-funded through national funding agencies. Lead researcher Professor Catherina Becker, Director of the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Neuroregeneration, said: "This exciting project brings together leading experts from across Europe to explore the intrinsic capacity of the spinal cord to repair itself. We hope this will eventually lead to urgently needed therapies for people who have damage to their spinal cord, either from disease or injury."


News Article | February 3, 2016
Site: phys.org

Light microscopy image of a live Drosophila that was unable to produce enough growth factor idgf6 due to a genetic modification. As a result, defects can be seen in the respiratory organ as well as in the chitinous shell. Credit: Dr. Matthias Behr With their chitinous shells, insects seem almost invulnerable – but like Achilles' heel in Greek mythology, their impressive armor can still be attacked. Researchers at the universities of Bonn and Leipzig studied fruit flies (Drosophila) and discovered the molecular processes that are able to break through this protective casing. The enzyme chitinase 2 and growth factor idgf6 are especially important in correctly forming the insects' shells. These findings are relevant for fighting parasites, and will be published in the professional journal Scientific Reports. The same things that work with fruit flies (Drosophila) – one of developmental biologists' favorite animals to study – can generally also be applied to other insects. The deactivation of chitinase 2 and/or idgf6 genes results in a fragile shell that does not support adequate protection for larva of fruit flies and very likely other insects such as mosquitos. "Pathogens can then easily infiltrate the animals, and they usually die during the larval stage," says Assistant Professor Dr. Matthias Behr, who transferred from the Life & Medical Sciences (LIMES) Institute at his alma mater in Bonn to the Sächsische Inkubator für die klinische Translation (SIKT) at the University of Leipzig. The project was financed with funding from Special Research Area 645 at the University of Bonn. The current discovery offers completely new starting points for keeping agricultural parasites as well as dangerous disease-carrying insects in check. The enzyme chitinase 2 and growth factor idgf6 are essential for shell formation in nearly all insects, as well as in arthropods like crabs and spiders. "However, there are minor species-related differences that could allow us to develop tailor-made inhibitors that will prevent proper development of the chitinous shell in certain species," says first author Yanina-Yasmin Pesch from the LIMES Institute at the University of Bonn. Specially developed substances could be used to attack the chitinous covering of one arthropod species while leaving other species unharmed. Dr. Behr names two examples of possible applications: the spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) that recently migrated to Germany, and the new Zika virus pathogen. The spotted-wing drosophila causes enormous damage for the agricultural industry because it attacks a large volume of ripening fruit. The Zika virus is transmitted to people through mosquito bites. This virus is suspected of causing birth defects in Brazil, among other places. The researchers hope their discovery will make it easier to fight these kinds of dangerous insects in the future. The researchers from the universities of Bonn and Leipzig, as well as from the Max Planck Institute of Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, turned up one other surprising find: "Until now, scientists assumed that chitinase 2 was a degradation enzyme," reports Pesch. "But surprisingly, it has now been found that the enzyme is essential in forming the chitinous shell." When the protective casing is being created, chitinase shortens the chitin to the right length. The precisely tailored components are then combined with other materials to build the shell. As the team of researchers already showed in a previous study, the "Obstructor-A" protein plays a key role here. Like a construction-site manager, it makes sure that various building materials are added to the protective shell in the right places. "Step by step, our research is revealing molecular details about the insects' Achilles heel," says Dr. Behr. More information: Yanina-Yasmin Pesch et al. Chitinases and Imaginal disc growth factors organize the extracellular matrix formation at barrier tissues in insects, Scientific Reports (2016). DOI: 10.1038/srep18340


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: physicsworld.com

SPIE Optics + Optoelectronics is where leading researchers, engineers and programme managers share their latest advances, highlighting the technologies that drive Europe’s largest optoelectronic infrastructure projects. Meeting content includes technologies related to HiLASE, LMJ and the ELI beamlines, plus conferences on high-power and high-energy lasers, Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), laser acceleration of particles, and X-ray, VUV and EUV optics, as well as the areas of metamaterials, optical sensors, holography, quantum optics, and nonlinear optics. Hear the latest research in: • Metamaterials • Nonlinear Optics and Its Applications • Photon Counting Applications • Quantum Optics and Quantum Information Transfer and Processing • Optical Sensors • Micro-structured and Specialty Optical Fibres • Holography: Advances and Modern Trends • Relativistic Plasma Waves and Particle Beams as Coherent and Incoherent Radiation Sources • EUV and X-ray Optics: Synergy between Laboratory and Space • Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-ray Optics (XDamVI) • X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Advances in Source Development and Instrumentation • High-Power, High-Energy, and High-Intensity Laser Technology • Medical Applications of Laser-Generated Beams of Particles: Review of Progress & Strategies for the Future • Laser Acceleration of Electrons, Protons and Ions • Research Using Extreme Light: Entering New Frontiers with Petawatt-Class Lasers • Integrated Optics: Physics and Simulations • X-Ray Lasers and Coherent X-Ray Sources: Development and Applications • Technology and Applications of Intense, High Average Power Lasers Workshop Optics + Optoelectronics 2017 Exhibition Where research, technology and industry meet. Optical instruments are addressing an ever increasing number of industrial and research applications: imaging and vision, defence, telecommunications, space, transportation, industrial process control, laser fusion, etc. SPIE Optics + Optoelectronics Exhibition gives you the opportunity to make connections with suppliers and project partners from around the world in these areas. • Optical components • Lasers and light sources • Lenses and coatings • Optical sensors and fiber sensors • Custom optics • Materials and chemicals • Metrology and testing equipment • Nano- and microtechnology • X-ray optics and devices • Optoelectronic components and systems Exhibition Dates and Hours: Tuesday 25 April 10.00 to 17.00 Wednesday 26 April 10.00 to 16.00 An added attraction is the location of the highly regarded ELI Beamlines Facility, as well as the HiLASE Laser Center, both near Prague. A tour of HiLASE is being planned. There are multiple opportunities to access the latest research and technologies associated with the European Research Area (ERA) through ELI Beamlines, HiLASE, and the Central Laser Facility. With the development of these new laser technologies, there are ever wider scientific and industrial applications. Take this opportunity to hear first-hand the latest advancements as well as interact with the researchers and academics that are part of this ground-breaking research. ELI Beamlines Facility is multi-functional and designed to serve researchers specializing in laser science, but also in areas of material science, engineering, nanotechnology, medicine, biology, chemistry, astrophysics and others. By 2018 the ELI Beamlines facility will be open for user experiments. The HiLASE project, focuses on development high-repetition lasers and laser systems that will find use in industry, in small- and medium-scale research laboratories and in the future European large-scale facilities that will be part of the ERA.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Computers are everywhere and success in the future will increasingly depend on understanding how technology works. Unfortunately fewer than half of all schools teach computer science. The Hour of Code is a one-hour introduction, to show that anybody can learn the basics of coding. In just one hour all students can learn that computer science is fun and creative. "The Hour of Code is designed to demystify code and show that computer science is not rocket science—anybody can learn the basics," said Hadi Partovi, founder and CEO of Code.org. "Over 100 million students worldwide have tried an Hour of Code. The demand for relevant 21st century computer science education crosses all borders and knows no boundaries." RAFT’s activity, Puppy Programming, is an unplugged approach to teaching coding with no device needed. Students must lead a puppy to a tennis ball while avoiding blockers, represented by corks. They must give exact instructions in proper order for their "program" to run properly. The set of instructions for the puppy to successfully reach the ball is a model of a computer program. The students are coding without the need for devices or internet connections! This fun and easy activity reinforces programming techniques such as planning, sequencing, testing, debugging, and creating procedures and loops. By creating and testing out these simple programs students are both generating and comparing multiple solutions for transferring data (the puppy) using a patterns (sequence of instructions), without the need of a screen. Writing a successful program requires planning and foresight. “We loved putting together the Puppy Programmer Game. We learned about strategy, and clockwise and counterclockwise direction. We played it with children ages 6 to 14. Everyone enjoyed it”, said one RAFT member who recently used the activity with an after school group. Students use a set of basic cards to sequence the steps to get the puppy to the tennis ball. Advanced cards introduce the concepts of direction and loops. The programs are easily created and provide excellent opportunity for team collaboration and peer assessment because the models can be tried by other teams, allowing for immediate peer feedback. Teams can exchange cards and look for errors, such as the puppy hitting a cork, and then correct, or debug, the program. Puppy Programming can be used as an Hour of Code activity. The Hour of Code can take place any time of year but is frequently held by schools and organizations during Computer Science Education Week, which in 2016 is December 5-11. The activity is documented here and a prepackaged kit is also available. Find out more about RAFT and how to get involved at http://www.raft.net RAFT – Resource Area For Teaching is a non-profit, resource solution to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands on education to one that inspires the joy and discovery of learning. Founded in 1994, RAFT focuses on providing educators of all types – classroom teachers, after school educators, home-school educators, scout leaders, early care and education professionals – with effective, engaging, affordable hands-on learning resources aligned to national curriculum standards. RAFT, believes the best way to spark a love of learning for the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers, and creators is through hands-on learning. RAFT supports some 11,000 educators in enriching and improving the education of more than 850,000 students young year. ©1994-2016 Resource Area For Teaching. All rights reserved. The RAFT logo and RAFT product names referenced herein are trademarks or service marks of RAFT – Research Area For Teaching. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

RAFT - Resource Area for Teaching, the leading solution center to help educators in transforming a child’s learning experience through hands-on education, announces the res 2016 is coming on December 21 at 10:44 UTC. Just what is the winter solstice? For those of us in the Northern Hemisphere, the December solstice marks the longest night and shortest day of the year. Meanwhile, the Southern Hemisphere has its longest day and shortest night. The solstice is an astronomical event, caused by Earth’s tilt on its axis, and its motion in orbit around the sun. The tilt of the Earth – not our distance from the sun – is what causes winter and summer. Most people believe our seasons are the result of our changing distance from the sun but that’s not true. We are actually closest to the sun in winter and farthest during the summer months, just the opposite of what many believe. The seasons are not due to our location but are instead the result of changes in the amount of solar energy which is received at the Earth's surface. This concept can be difficult for students to grasp. RAFT’s ‘Reason for the Seasons’ Idea Sheet has students use a flashlight to simulate the angle of the sun at different times of the year. They observe how the light disperses differently depending on the season. Students see when the light hitting the earth is direct vs indirect, the area impacted, and how shadows change. This activity helps students understand the location of the Earth in relation to the sun and that the cause of seasonal temperature differences is the concentration of sunlight. During summer, in either hemisphere, the Earth’s axis of rotation is tilted towards the sun, causing longer days. As the sunlight then falls more directly its concentration increases. These two factors cause higher temperatures. During the winter, as the Earth tilts away from the sun, we see shorter days, more indirect sunlight, and then lower temperatures. RAFT’s ‘Time for Shadows’ Idea Sheet has students assemble an equatorial sundial, which is really a small model of the earth. With their sundial students can use the movement of shadows to track the passage of time. The first sundials were probably just sticks but they allowed people to make observations of repeating patterns, such as the longer summer days. As measurements became more precise special dates, such as the upcoming winter solstice, could be predicted. This contributed critical information to know when to plant or harvest crops or prepare for seasonal events such as flooding or animal migrations. Together RAFT’s ‘Reason for the Seasons’, here, and ‘Time for Shadows’, here, help students understand seasonal variations with hands-on activities. Find out more about RAFT and how to get involved at http://www.raft.net RAFT – Resource Area For Teaching is a non-profit, resource solution to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands on education to one that inspires the joy and discovery of learning. Founded in 1994, RAFT focuses on providing educators of all types – classroom teachers, after school educators, home-school educators, scout leaders, early care and education professionals – with effective, engaging, affordable hands-on learning resources aligned to national curriculum standards. RAFT, believes the best way to spark a love of learning for the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers, and creators is through hands-on learning. RAFT supports some 11,000 educators in enriching and improving the education of more than 850,000 students young year. ©1994-2016 Resource Area For Teaching. All rights reserved. The RAFT logo and RAFT product names referenced herein are trademarks or service marks of RAFT – Research Area For Teaching. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

SAN JOSE, CALIF. – October 6, 2016 – RAFT - Resource Area For Teaching, the leading solution center to help educators in transform a child’s learning experience through hands-on education, offers fun ways to educate and prepare kids for earthquakes. Last month was recognized as National Preparedness Month (NPM) which serves as a reminder that we all must take action to prepare, now and throughout the year, for the types of emergencies that could affect us where we live, work, and also where we visit. October is a great month for practice. Earthquake drills are often held including the Great American Shake Out drill on October 20. Great Shake Out Earthquake Drills are an annual opportunity for people in homes, schools, and organizations to practice what to do during earthquakes, and to improve preparedness Everyone, everywhere, should know how to protect themselves during earthquakes. Even if earthquakes are rare in some areas, they can happen while traveling or visiting relatives. RAFT offers several kits and idea sheets geared to educate and prepare students for such an emergency. Motorize Shake Table Kit - Build a simple structure on the shake table, start the motor, and watch the action! Brace Yourself Kit - How will an earthquake, simulated by shaking, affect a "building" made of linked squares? How can the square "stories" be cross-braced to prevent the "walls" from collapsing? Learn these answers and more with this kit. Your Room in an Earthquake Idea sheet - In this modeling activity, students discover earthquake safety measures they can implement in their own bedrooms and homes. Be Prepared Idea sheet - Evaluate potential natural hazards and develop plans to address the dangers. Millions of people worldwide will practice how to Drop, Cover, and Hold-On on October 20 during Great Shake Out Earthquake Drills, which began in California in 2008. Participating is a great way for families or organizations to be prepared to survive and recover quickly from big earthquakes Find out more about RAFT and how to get involved at http://www.raft.net RAFT – Resource Area For Teaching is a non-profit, resource solution to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands on education to one that inspires the joy and discovery of learning. Founded in 1994, RAFT focuses on providing educators of all types – classroom teachers, after school educators, home-school educators, scout leaders, early care and education professionals – with effective, engaging, affordable hands-on learning resources aligned to national curriculum standards. RAFT, believes the best way to spark a love of learning for the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers, and creators is through hands-on learning. RAFT supports some 7,000 educators in enriching and improving the education of more than 550,000 students young year. ©1994-2016 Resource Area For Teaching. All rights reserved. The RAFT logo and RAFT product names referenced herein are trademarks or service marks of RAFT – Research Area For Teaching. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

SAN JOSE, CA, February 28, 2017-- RAFT, Resource Area for Teaching, is the leading solution center helping educators to transform a child's learning experience through hands-on education. On Feb. 20, Lockheed Martin volunteers came to RAFT during National Engineers Week and built 500 STEM student activity kits to stimulate design-thinking among students.Lockheed Martin has volunteered at RAFT during National Engineers Week for the past two years to support the alignment of the hands-on activity kits with the purpose of National Engineers Week, which is to inspire students to learn about engineering. Lockheed Martin is committed to nurturing and equipping the next generation of scientists, engineers and space explorers."Our partnership with RAFT is one way we support the teachers in our community who share STEM concepts with their students," said Lauren Rohde, lead for Bay Area Community Relations at Lockheed Martin. "For National Engineers Week, we had nearly 30 employees support the kit activity and hosted additional student outreach events across our company throughout the week."RAFT offers a wide range of STEM-focused idea sheets, activity kits, design challenges, and professional development workshops for educator and student use. The volunteers assembled three different kits.200 Kumihimo kits, which tie together art, history, and mathematical patterns. Each kit serves 10 students.100 Evolution by Natural Selection kits, which simulate evolution and show how adaptations such as camouflage help organisms survive and pass on traits to offspring. This kit is a group activity for up to six students.200 Roller Racer kits, which explore the application of simple machines and energy conversion. This kit has materials for 10 students.These RAFT kits allow students to explore a range of STEM related concepts. Thanks to the volunteers from Lockheed Martin, 4,600 future engineers will be inspired and have fun while learning.Find out more about RAFT at www.raft.net About RAFT - Resource Area For TeachingRAFT - Resource Area For Teaching is a non-profit, which helps educators transform a child's learning experience through hands on education to one that inspires the joy and discovery of learning. Founded in 1994, RAFT focuses on providing educators of all types - classroom teachers, after school educators, home-school educators, scout leaders, early care and education professionals - with effective, engaging, affordable hands-on learning resources aligned to national curriculum standards. RAFT, believes the best way to spark a love of learning for the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers, and creators is through hands-on learning. RAFT supports some 7,000 educators in enriching and improving the education of more than 500,000 students every year.1994-2017 Resource Area For Teaching. All rights reserved. The RAFT logo and RAFT product names referenced herein are trademarks or service marks of RAFT - Research Area For Teaching. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

RAFT (Resource Area For Teaching) and members from the Orchard School community together created a new makerspace. With the help of Project Ember, the group of students, parents, teachers, school administrators, and RAFT employees transformed an old, unused locker room into a space where making supplies can be found for use by the entire student body. Orchard is a K-8 school with a student body of approximately 900. The aim of this makerspace is to enhance student learning through providing space and materials for hands-on projects. Supporting curriculum from RAFT encourages students to create and problem solve using the design thinking process. These experiences deepen student learning and understanding of topics currently in their curriculum. The Orchard makerspace has been stocked with a specific focus in supplies for math and art. “We are very excited to have a makerspace at Orchard School. There was tremendous enthusiasm from the students who helped to build the tables and carts”, Says Peter Holley, teacher at Orchard School. “The makerspace will give students more variety in their classroom experiences as teachers utilize it in their curriculum. We are also working toward giving students opportunities to use the space outside of class on projects that make them excited to create.” The day began with Project Ember’s safety training and explanation of reverse engineering to provide students the knowledge and encouragement to work as autonomously as possible. Project Ember is a Bay Area Maker Camp dedicated to stoking kids' creativity, confidence and sense of community through the creation of large scale projects. RAFT provided a broad collection of containers which students transformed into storage solutions. They sorted a cornucopia of donated materials, organized, and stocked their new makerspace. Classes and groups of students will be able to visit their makerspace and collect materials useful in prototyping their own designs. One student exclaimed “I can’t believe I built this”. Peter expounds, “This is the kind of experience we want to bring to our students. We want them to be excited about making and proud of the work they accomplish.” RAFT assists schools with the design of makerspaces, whether in dedicated rooms, at the back of classrooms, or even via portable designs. To then support these spaces, RAFT stocks the space with an ongoing supply of surplus materials. Thanks to the support of hundreds of corporate and community donors, RAFT is able to provide schools such as Orchard with a wide range of materials to incorporate in their STEM learning. Maker education stimulates students to make flexible, adaptive choices about the materials and tools they use in learning challenges. For more information about RAFT makerspace products and services visit http://raft.education/ RAFT – Resource Area For Teaching is a non-profit, resource solution to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands on education to one that inspires the joy and discovery of learning. Founded in 1994, RAFT focuses on providing educators of all types – classroom teachers, after school educators, homeschool educators, scout leaders, early care and education professionals – with effective, engaging, affordable hands-on learning resources aligned to national curriculum standards. RAFT, believes the best way to spark a love of learning for the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers, and creators is through hands-on learning. RAFT supports some 7,000 educators in enriching and improving the education of more than 550,000 students young year. ©1994-2016 Resource Area For Teaching. All rights reserved. The RAFT logo and RAFT product names referenced herein are trademarks or service marks of RAFT – Research Area For Teaching. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.

Loading Research Area collaborators
Loading Research Area collaborators