Research Animal Diagnostic Services

Fall River, MA, United States

Research Animal Diagnostic Services

Fall River, MA, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

PubMed | Research Animal Resources, U.S. National Institutes of Health and Research Animal Diagnostic Services
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science : JAALAS | Year: 2013

Detecting and controlling murine fur mites continues to be challenging. Here we compared the efficacy of fur-pluck, cage PCR, and fur PCR testing of mice naturally infested with Myocoptes musculinus and make recommendations regarding the application of these diagnostic strategies in aged or treated mice. We compared all 3 diagnostic methods in groups of infested and noninfested control mice over time. For fur plucks, we used a scoring system to quantitatively compare mite infestations across ages. Mice that were 4 wk old had higher egg and mite scores than did older mice, with average scores at 4 wk corresponding to 40 to 100 individual fur mites and eggs per sample. Furthermore, 15% and 20% of samples from infested mice at 24 and 28 wk of age, respectively, lacked all fur mites and eggs. Cage PCR results varied as mice grew older. Fur PCR testing was the most sensitive and specific assay in untreated infested mice, particularly when mite densities were low. In addition, we compared fur-pluck and fur PCR tests for evaluating the efficacy of selamectin treatment. Two treatments with selamectin eliminated Myocoptes fur-mite infestations. At 8 wk after treatment, all fur-pluck samples were negative, but one-third of treated infested cages remained positive by fur PCR assay; at 16 wk after treatment, all cages were negative by fur PCR assay. Because offspring of infested mice were invariably heavily infested, breeding of suspected infested mice with subsequent testing of offspring was the definitive testing strategy when fur-pluck and PCR results conflicted.


Jensen E.S.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Allen K.P.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Henderson K.S.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Szabo A.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Thulin J.D.,Medical College of Wisconsin
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science | Year: 2013

Rodents housed in microisolation caging are commonly monitored for infectious agents by the use of soiled bedding sentinels. This strategy relies on the successful transmission of rodent pathogens from the index rodents via soiled bedding to sentinel cages and the subsequent infection or colonization of sentinel rodents. When the prevalence of a pathogen is low or the target agent is not readily transmitted by soiled bedding, alternative testing methodologies should be used. Given the continued prevalence of institutions self-reporting murine fur mites and with the advent of a new sensitive and specific PCR assay for mites, we sought to determine whether the exhaust system of an individual ventilated caging (IVC) system could be used for monitoring the rack's rodent population for mites rather than relying on the responses of sentinels. We deployed single cages of mice (Mus musculus) that were known to be infested with either Radfordia affinis or Myobia musculi on a 70-cage rack, sampled the horizontal exhaust manifolds weekly, and used the new PCR assay to test these samples for mite DNA. We detected the presence of fur mites at a 94.1% probability of detection within 4 wk of placement. Therefore, we recommend swabbing and testing the shelf exhaust manifolds of IVC racks rather than relying on soiled-bedding sentinels as an indicator of the mite status of the rodents on that rack. Copyright 2013 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.


Dole V.S.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Banu L.A.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Fister R.D.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Nicklas W.,German Cancer Research Center | Henderson K.S.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services
Comparative Medicine | Year: 2010

Diagnosis of Pasteurella pneumotropica in laboratory animals relies on isolation of the organism, biochemical characterization, and, more recently, DNA-based diagnostic methods. 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences were examined for development of a real-time PCR assay. Partial sequencing of rpoB (456 bp) and 16S rRNA (1368 bp) of Pasteurella pneumotropica isolates identified by microbiologic and biochemical assays indicated that either gene sequence can be used to distinguish P. pneumotropica from other members of the Pasteurellaceae family. However, alignment of rpoB sequences from the Pasteurella pneumotropica Heyl (15 sequences) and Jawetz (16 sequences) biotypes with other Pasteurellaceae sequences from GenBank indicated that although rpoB DNA sequencing could be used for diagnosis, development of diagnostic primers and probes would be difficult, because the sequence variability between Heyl and Jawetz biotypes is not clustered in any particular region of the rpoB sequence. In contrast, alignment of 16S rRNA sequences revealed a region with unique and stable nucleotide motifs sufficient to permit development of a specific fluorogenic real-time PCR assay to confirm P. pneumotropica isolated by culture and to differentiate Heyl and Jawetz biotypes. Copyright 2010 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.


Dole V.S.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Zaias J.,University of Miami | Kyricopoulos-Cleasby D.M.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Banu L.A.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science | Year: 2011

Pinworm detection in laboratory rodents typically is accomplished by using the tape test or various modifications of fecal flotation test to detect eggs. Direct examination of intestinal contents remains the 'gold standard' for pinworm detection, with the limitation of euthanasia of animals. Here, we compare traditional and real-time PCR methodologies during screening for and confirming the presence of Aspiculuris tetraptera. Two sets of pooled fecal samples collected from each of 521 microisolation cages in a mouse facility suspected to be pinworm-positive were tested by PCR and fecal flotation methods. The number of PCR-positive cages was 48 (9.2%) compared with 5 (0.96%) by the fecal flotation method. All of the cages determined to be positive by fecal flotation were positive by PCR. We evaluated 8 positive cages containing 26 mice from the screening group 5 wk later to confirm the initial findings; for 7 of these cages, PCR results from the initial screening were confirmed by fecal centrifugation concentration (FCC) or direct worm detection. Among the 26 mice, 4 were pinworm-positive by FCC, 5 by maceration, and 16 by PCR. All 4 mice positive by FCC were positive by PCR; PCR was positive for 7 of the 9 mice in which pinworms were detected by FCC or maceration. Our study demonstrates that real-time PCR for survival testing of mice for A. tetraptera effectively augments current detection methods for quarantine and routine health monitoring. Copyright 2011 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.


PubMed | Research Animal Diagnostic Services and Harvard University
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Comparative medicine | Year: 2015

This study characterized the effects of challenge with a field isolate of mouse parvovirus 1 (MPV1e) in C57BL/6NCrl (B6) and BALB/cAnNCrl (C) mice. We found that C mice were more susceptible to MPV1e infection than were B6 mice; ID50 were 50 to 100 times higher after gavage and 10-fold higher after intraperitoneal injection in B6 as compared with C mice. To evaluate the host strain effect on the pathogenesis of MPV1e, B6 and C mice were inoculated by gavage. Feces and tissues, including mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), ileum, spleen and blood, were collected for analysis by quantitative PCR (qPCR) to assess infection and fecal shedding and by RT-qPCR to evaluate replication. Peak levels of MPV1e shedding, infection, and replication were on average 3.4, 4.3, and 6.2 times higher, respectively, in C than in B6 mice. Peaks occurred between 3 and 10 d after inoculation in C mice but between 5 and 14 d in B6 mice. Multiplexed fluorometric immunoassays detected seroconversion in 2 of 3 C mice at 7 d after inoculation and in all 3 B6 mice at 10 d. By 56 d after inoculation, viral replication was no longer detectable, and fecal shedding was very low; infection persisted in ileum, spleen, and MLN, with levels higher in C than B6 mice and highest in MLN. Therefore, the lower susceptibility of B6 mice, as compared with C mice, to MPV1e infection was associated with lower levels of infection, replication, and shedding and delayed seroconversion.


Parkinson C.M.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services
Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE | Year: 2011

Internal and external parasites remain a significant concern in laboratory rodent facilities, and many research facilities harbor some parasitized animals. Before embarking on an examination of animals for parasites, two things should be considered. One: what use will be made of the information collected, and two: which test is the most appropriate. Knowing that animals are parasitized may be something that the facility accepts, but there is often a need to treat animals and then to determine the efficacy of treatment. Parasites may be detected in animals through various techniques, including samples taken from live or euthanized animals. Historically, the tests with the greatest diagnostic sensitivity required euthanasia of the animal, although PCR has allowed high-sensitivity testing for several types of parasite. This article demonstrates procedures for the detection of endo- and ectoparasites in mice and rats. The same procedures are applicable to other rodents, although the species of parasites found will differ.


Henderson K.S.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Perkins C.L.,Research Animal Diagnostic Services | Havens R.B.,Charles River Laboratories | Kelly M.-J.E.,Charles River Laboratories | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science | Year: 2013

We used a high-density array of real-time PCR assays for commonly reported rodent infectious agents (PRIA) to test naturally infected index mice and sentinel mice exposed by contact and soiled-bedding transfer. PRIA detected 14 pathogens - including viruses, bacteria, fur mites, pinworms, and enteric protozoa - in 97.2% of 28 pooled fecal samples, fur-perianal swabs, and oral swabs from 4 cages containing a total of 10 index mice. Among these pathogens, PRIA (like conventional health monitoring methods) failed to detect Mycoplasma pulmonis, Pasteurella pneumotropica, and Giardia spp. in all of the 9 contact and 9 soiled-bedding sentinels. PRIA demonstrated murine adenovirus and Cryptosporidium and Spironucleus spp. in contact but not soiled-bedding sentinels and detected Helicobacter and pinworms in fewer than half of the soiled-bedding sentinels. Of the 4 species of Helicobacter that species-specific PCR assays identified in index mice, only H. ganmani was found in soiledbedding and contact sentinels. PRIA detected all of the pathogens in sentinels that were identified by conventional methods. Myobia musculi was detected by PCR in index and sentinel mice but missed by conventional parasitologic examinations. In summary, PRIA reproducibly detected diverse pathogens in heavily pooled specimens collected noninvasively from infected index mice antemortem. The inability of PRIA and conventional health monitoring methods (that is, parasitology, microbiology, and serology) to demonstrate transmission of some pathogens to contact sentinels and the inefficient transmission of others to soiled-bedding sentinels underscores the importance of direct PCR testing to determine the pathogen status of rodents in quarantine and during routine colony surveillance. Copyright 2013 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.


PubMed | Research Animal Diagnostic Services
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Comparative medicine | Year: 2011

Diagnosis of Pasteurella pneumotropica in laboratory animals relies on isolation of the organism, biochemical characterization, and, more recently, DNA-based diagnostic methods. 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences were examined for development of a real-time PCR assay. Partial sequencing of rpoB (456 bp) and 16S rRNA (1368 bp) of Pasteurella pneumotropica isolates identified by microbiologic and biochemical assays indicated that either gene sequence can be used to distinguish P. pneumotropica from other members of the Pasteurellaceae family. However, alignment of rpoB sequences from the Pasteurella pneumotropica Heyl (15 sequences) and Jawetz (16 sequences) biotypes with other Pasteurellaceae sequences from GenBank indicated that although rpoB DNA sequencing could be used for diagnosis, development of diagnostic primers and probes would be difficult, because the sequence variability between Heyl and Jawetz biotypes is not clustered in any particular region of the rpoB sequence. In contrast, alignment of 16S rRNA sequences revealed a region with unique and stable nucleotide motifs sufficient to permit development of a specific fluorogenic real-time PCR assay to confirm P. pneumotropica isolated by culture and to differentiate Heyl and Jawetz biotypes.


PubMed | Research Animal Diagnostic Services
Type: | Journal: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE | Year: 2011

There are multiple sample types that may be collected from a euthanized animal in order to help diagnose or discover infectious agents in an animal colony. Proper collection of tissues for further histological processing can impact the quality of testing results. This article describes the conduct of a basic gross examination including identification of heart, liver, lungs, kidneys, and spleen, as well as how to collect those organs. Additionally four of the more difficult tissue/sample collection techniques are demonstrated. Lung collection and perfusion can be particularly challenging as the tissue needs to be properly inflated with a fixative in order for inside of the tissue to fix properly and to enable thorough histologic evaluation. This article demonstrates the step by step technique to remove the lung and inflate it with fixative in order to achieve optimal fixation of the tissue within 24 hours. Brain collection can be similarly challenging as the tissue is soft and easily damaged. This article demonstrates the step by step technique to expose and remove the brain from the skull with minimal damage to the tissue. The mesenteric lymph node is a good sample type in which to detect many common infectious agents as enteric viruses persist longer in the lymph node than they are shed in feces. This article demonstrates the step by step procedure for locating and aseptically removing the mesenteric lymph node. Finally, identification of infectious agents of the respiratory tract may be performed by bacterial culture or PCR testing of nasal and/or bronchial fluid aspirates taken at necropsy. This procedure describes obtaining and preparing the respiratory aspirate sample for bacterial culture and PCR testing.


PubMed | Research Animal Diagnostic Services and Charles River Laboratories
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science : JAALAS | Year: 2013

We used a high-density array of real-time PCR assays for commonly reported rodent infectious agents (PRIA) to test naturally infected index mice and sentinel mice exposed by contact and soiled-bedding transfer. PRIA detected 14 pathogens--including viruses, bacteria, fur mites, pinworms, and enteric protozoa--in 97.2% of 28 pooled fecal samples, fur-perianal swabs, and oral swabs from 4 cages containing a total of 10 index mice. Among these pathogens, PRIA (like conventional health monitoring methods) failed to detect Mycoplasma pulmonis, Pasteurella pneumotropica, and Giardia spp. in all of the 9 contact and 9 soiled-bedding sentinels. PRIA demonstrated murine adenovirus and Cryptosporidium and Spironucleus spp. in contact but not soiled-bedding sentinels and detected Helicobacter and pinworms in fewer than half of the soiled-bedding sentinels. Of the 4 species of Helicobacter that species-specific PCR assays identified in index mice, only H. ganmani was found in soiled-bedding and contact sentinels. PRIA detected all of the pathogens in sentinels that were identified by conventional methods. Myobia musculi was detected by PCR in index and sentinel mice but missed by conventional parasitologic examinations. In summary, PRIA reproducibly detected diverse pathogens in heavily pooled specimens collected noninvasively from infected index mice antemortem. The inability of PRIA and conventional health monitoring methods (that is, parasitology, micro-biology, and serology) to demonstrate transmission of some pathogens to contact sentinels and the inefficient transmission of others to soiled-bedding sentinels underscores the importance of direct PCR testing to determine the pathogen status of rodents in quarantine and during routine colony surveillance.

Loading Research Animal Diagnostic Services collaborators
Loading Research Animal Diagnostic Services collaborators