Research and Training Institute

Anderson, United States

Research and Training Institute

Anderson, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Longacre M.L.,Fox Chase Cancer Center | Longacre M.L.,Research and Training Institute | Valdmanis V.G.,Grand Valley State University | Handorf E.A.,Fox Chase Cancer Center | Fang C.Y.,Fox Chase Cancer Center
Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences | Year: 2017

Objectives: With the growing aging population and reliance on informal caregivers in the United States, many individuals will take on the role of caregiver as an adult. We examined whether informal caregivers experience work interference or a change in work status (i.e., retiring/quitting) due to caregiving. We also explored whether experiencing work interference or a change in work status was associated with greater emotional stress. Method: This secondary analysis is drawn from the Fifth National Survey of Older Americans Act (OAA) program participants, which included 1,793 family caregivers. The present analysis is on caregivers of working age (18-64 years) providing care to another adult, which included 922 caregivers. Ordinal logit models were used to assess associations between experiencing work interference or a change in work status and emotional stress. Study weights were applied for all analyses. Results: At the time of the survey, more than half (52.9%) of caregivers were employed full- or part-time. Among nonworking caregivers (i.e., not working or retired) at the time of the survey, 39.8% responded that they had quit or retired early due to caregiving demands. Among employed caregivers, 52.4% reported that informal caregiving had interfered with their employment. Importantly, those respondents who reported work interference or a change in work status were more likely to report higher levels of emotional stress associated with caregiving demands. Discussion: These findings suggest the need to further explore work among informal caregivers and associations with emotional stress, as well as consider work-based policy approaches, organizational and/or societal, to support informal caregivers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved.


Buzaglo J.S.,Research and Training Institute | Miller S.M.,Fox Chase Cancer Center | Kendall J.,Southwestern Simmons Cancer Center | Stanton A.L.,University of California at Los Angeles | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Cancer Survivorship | Year: 2013

Introduction: The NCI developed the print-based educational brochure, Facing Forward, to fill a gap in helping cancer patients meet the challenges of transitioning from active treatment to survivorship; however, little research has been conducted on its efficacy. Purpose: The aims of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of Facing Forward in promoting the uptake of recommended behaviors (e. g., ways to manage physical changes) and to explore its usability. Methods: At the last treatment appointment, early-stage breast, prostate, colorectal, and thoracic cancer patients (N = 340) recruited from community clinical oncology practices and an academic medical center completed a baseline assessment and were randomized to receive either Facing Forward (n = 175) or an attention control booklet about the NCI's Cancer Information Service (n = 165). Patients completed follow-up assessments at 8 weeks and 6 months post-baseline. Results: The reported uptake of recommended stress management behaviors was greater among intervention than control participants at both 8 weeks post-baseline (p = 0. 016) and 6 months post-baseline (p = 0. 017). At 8 weeks post-baseline, the intervention control group difference was greater among African-American than Caucasian participants (p < 0.03) and significant only among the former (p < 0.003); attendance at a cancer support group was also greater among the intervention than control group participants (p < 0.02). There were no significant intervention control group differences in the reported uptake of recommended behaviors in three other categories (p > 0.025). Intervention participants rated Facing Forward as understandable and helpful and indicated a high level of intention to try the behaviors recommended. Conclusions: Facing Forward can enhance early-stage survivors' reported ability to manage stress and increase support group use during the reentry period. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Facing Forward can help survivors meet the challenges of the reentry period. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Lepore S.J.,Temple University | Buzaglo J.S.,Research and Training Institute | Lieberman M.A.,University of California at San Francisco | Golant M.,Research and Training Institute | Davey A.,Temple University
BMC Cancer | Year: 2011

Background: The Internet can increase access to psychosocial care for breast cancer survivors through online support groups. This study will test a novel prosocial online group that emphasizes both opportunities for getting and giving help. Based on the helper therapy principle, it is hypothesized that the addition of structured helping opportunities and coaching on how to help others online will increase the psychological benefits of a standard online group.Methods/Design: A two-armed randomized controlled trial with pretest and posttest. Non-metastatic breast cancer survivors with elevated psychological distress will be randomized to either a standard facilitated online group or to a prosocial facilitated online group, which combines online exchanges of support with structured helping opportunities (blogging, breast cancer outreach) and coaching on how best to give support to others. Validated and reliable measures will be administered to women approximately one month before and after the interventions. Self-esteem, positive affect, and sense of belonging will be tested as potential mediators of the primary outcomes of depressive/anxious symptoms and sense of purpose in life.Discussion: This study will test an innovative approach to maximizing the psychological benefits of cancer online support groups. The theory-based prosocial online support group intervention model is sustainable, because it can be implemented by private non-profit or other organizations, such as cancer centers, which mostly offer face-to-face support groups with limited patient reach.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01396174. © 2011 Lepore et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Belkora J.K.,University of California at San Francisco | Miller M.F.,Public Health Research Scientist | Dougherty K.,Research Partnership | Gayer C.,Research and Training Institute | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Community and Supportive Oncology | Year: 2015

Background Qualitative studies have identified barriers to communication and informed decision making among breast cancer survivors making treatment decisions. The prevalence of these barriers is unknown. Objective To quantify the need for decision support among breast cancer survivors. Methods We surveyed 2,521 breast cancer survivors participating in an online registry hosted by the Cancer Support Community to find out what proportion of breast cancer patients: made decisions during their first visit with a specialist; received satisfactory information before that visit; asked questions and received responses; and endorsed expanded use of decision support. Results We received 1,017 (41%) responses and analyzed 917 surveys from women who lived in the United States. Most of the respondents recalled making treatment decisions during their first visit (52%). A minority (14%) received information before the first specialist visit. At least 25% of respondents rated their satisfaction below 7 on a scale of 10 for decision-making, information, and questions asked and answered. Respondents endorsed the need for assistance with obtaining information, listing questions, taking notes, and making audio-recordings of visits. Limitations The respondent sample skewed younger and had higher-stage cancer compared with all breast cancer survivors. Reponses were subject to recall bias. Conclusions Cancer survivors expressed gaps in their care with respect to reviewing information, asking questions, obtaining answers, and making decisions. Implementing decision and communication aids immediately upon diagnosis, when treatment decisions are being made, would address these gaps. © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications.


PubMed | Konan Women's University, Research and Training Institute and Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychological services | Year: 2016

Research has consistently shown that actuarial measures are superior to unstructured clinical judgments in predicting recidivism of offenders. However, in a non-Western context, clinical judgment may capture contextually relevant risk-related factors. The purpose of the current research is to investigate the incremental value of clinical risk judgment in a sample of Japanese youths. With a sample of 299 released youths, the relative accuracy of the actuarial predictor (Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory [YLS/CMI]) and unstructured clinical judgment (recommendation of placement by psychologists) was examined. Results show that an unstructured clinical judgment failed to add incremental variance to the actuarial measure in the prediction of future offenses. The current study results are similar to other studies from North America. Possible reasons why unstructured risk judgment did not add incrementally to the actuarial assessment of risk are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record


Beccaria F.,Research and Training Institute | Rolando S.,Research and Training Institute | Rolando S.,University of Helsinki
Substance Use and Misuse | Year: 2013

This article, part of a comparative research project (WP2) funded by FP7 ALICE RAP, is based upon a review of literature and documents and 18 individual interviews with Italian national stakeholders (SHs) conducted in 2012. The goal was to identify the main shifts in opioid "substitution drug" treatment policies and understand the role played by different SHs during the last 30 years. The study confirms that opioid "substitution drug" treatment is a particularly suitable theme for improving knowledge in the field of SH analysis, even if results show that changes in policies are mainly due to external factors rather than to the action of SHs. Copyright © 2013 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Miller S.M.,Temple University | Hui S.K.A.,Temple University | Wen K.-Y.,Temple University | Scarpato J.,Temple University | And 3 more authors.
Patient Education and Counseling | Year: 2013

Objective: The present study explored the impact of a tailored telephone counseling intervention on increasing follow-up adherence after an abnormal Pap smear result among low-income, minority women, which may reduce cervical cancer disparity. Methods: Participants (N= 211) were randomly assigned to receive: (1) a telephone reminder that included an assessment of barriers to adherence, as well as counseling tailored to the barriers elicited; (2) telephone reminder and barriers assessment, followed by a mailed home tailored barriers print brochure; or (3) enhanced standard care comprising telephone reminder and barriers assessment. Assessments were obtained at initial contact and 1-week later, as well as at 6- and 12-months after the initial colposcopy. Results: The telephone counseling group showed greater adherence to follow-up recommendations than did the combined other two groups (p< 0.05). For the initial colposcopy, tailored telephone barriers counseling was more effective among women with a high school education or less. Conclusion: Tailored telephone barriers counseling improves adherence to initial colposcopy, as well as to longer-term medical follow-up, among low-income, inner-city women. Practice Implications: Dissemination of barriers counseling into ongoing telephone reminder calls and contacts may decrease disparities in cancer outcomes, especially among women with less than post-secondary education. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Miller M.F.,Research and Training Institute | Buzaglo J.S.,Research and Training Institute | Clark K.L.,Sheri and les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center | Loscalzo M.J.,Sheri and les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center | And 4 more authors.
Psycho-Oncology | Year: 2013

Objective The purpose was to test the psychometric properties of a 36-item community-based problem-related distress screening tool, among 319 cancer survivors recruited across 14 affiliates of the Cancer Support Community. Methods Internal reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Test-retest reliability was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Concurrent validity was determined by correlations with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Well-Being Scale (FACT-G), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Distress Thermometer (DT) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using the CES-D (≥16) and DT (≥4) as the criterion. Non-parametric analysis of variance was used to establish discriminant validity. Results The distress screener demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and strong test-retest reliability (ICC ≥ 0.75). Summary scores of the distress screener correlated substantially with the FACT-G (R2 = 0.58, p < 0.001), CES-D (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.001), and DT (R 2 = 0.35, p < 0.001) indicating strong concurrent validity and were able to discriminate groups of clinical relevance. ROC analyses showed a cutoff score of 8 for problem items rated ≥3 had optimal sensitivity and specificity relative to the CES-D and DT. Conclusions The distress screener shows strong psychometric properties and can be considered a valuable community-based instrument to screen for psychological distress related to social, emotional, physical, and other patient-related symptoms and problems. This study is the first to address the chasm between hospital and community-based screening by validating a community-based instrument and has begun to demonstrate the feasibility of screening in the community. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


WASHINGTON, Feb. 14, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Barbara Bradley Baekgaard Family Foundation announced today its pledge of more than $500,000 to the Cancer Support Community, a nonprofit focused on the social and emotional impact of cancer, to create welcoming spaces in hospitals where cancer support groups and programs will be put in place. The partnership will take place in six new hospital settings where the Cancer Support Community's vital programs for cancer patients and caregivers will be implemented. The Cancer Support Community began expansions into hospitals in 2013. This partnership will allow the organization to accelerate the expansion into additional hospitals across the nation. "Every Cancer Support Community and Gilda's Club location is designed to be a homelike space for people touched by cancer. Through this partnership, we are looking forward to creating warm and friendly spaces inside of hospitals where people facing cancer can receive professional, high quality services to help them during their cancer experience," said Kim Thiboldeaux, CEO of the Cancer Support Community. Hospital sites selected for the partnership will allocate space for Cancer Support Community programs and will receive design consultation from the Barbara Bradley Baekgaard Family Foundation. CSC facilities typically include a meeting room for group therapy, a reception area, office space, a library or other quiet space, and a kitchen area. While hospital and foundation staff work together to design the physical space, Cancer Support Community Headquarters will train staff in the organization's comprehensive program model to ensure the hospital meets all standards for service delivery. Barbara Bradley Baekgaard is a cofounder of Vera Bradley, Inc., a leading designer of women's handbags and accessories. "We are pleased to partner with the Cancer Support Community to bring their high quality, evidence-based program model to new hospital sites and help patients and their loved ones heal in a warm, inviting space," said Joanie Hall, a founder of the Barbara Bradley Baekgaard Family Foundation and member of the Bradley family. Recent studies have shown that not only do well-designed spaces increase patient satisfaction, but they also may have a therapeutic impact on patients, loved ones, and hospital staff, and may even reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes. Hospital sites for the partnership will be announced later in 2017, and Cancer Support Community programs will be implemented within 24 months. As the largest professionally led nonprofit network of cancer support worldwide, the Cancer Support Community (CSC), including its Gilda's Club affiliates, is dedicated to ensuring that all people impacted by cancer are empowered by knowledge, strengthened by action and sustained by community. CSC achieves its mission through three areas: direct service delivery, research and advocacy. The organization includes an international network of affiliates that offer the highest quality social and emotional support for people impacted by cancer, as well as a community of support available online and over the phone. The Research and Training Institute conducts cutting-edge psychosocial, behavioral and survivorship research. CSC furthers its focus on patient advocacy through its Cancer Policy Institute, informing public policy in Washington, D.C. and across the nation. For more information, please call the toll-free Cancer Support Helpline at 888-793-9355, or visit www.CancerSupportCommunity.org. So that no one faces cancer alone®


WASHINGTON, Nov. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A study released today shows that despite the rising complexity and cost of cancer care, few patients are having comprehensive care conversations with their health care providers, including conversations about costs. Further, only half of patients receive the psychosocial care they need to help them navigate the illness. The result is delays in care, increased out of pocket costs, lack of adherence to treatment, and potential negative overall patient outcomes. The report, based on a survey of 1,046 people who have had cancer, demonstrates several key findings that offer insight into the patient experience with insurance across all coverage categories. "Despite health reform efforts to provide more comprehensive care solutions to patients, some patients today are experiencing treatment delays and increased out of pocket costs, often related to cost containment strategies they do not understand well," said Kim Thiboldeaux, CEO of the Cancer Support Community.   Particular findings of interest include that when making decisions about their cancer treatment, 68 percent of patients did not talk about costs with their health care team. Additionally, 25 percent of patients said they are uncertain that they received the care they needed, and 43 percent of patients reported that over the past year, their out of pocket health care costs have been larger than expected.   Additional findings include: The full report is available online at www.CancerSupportCommunity.org About the Cancer Support Community   As the largest professionally led nonprofit network of cancer support worldwide, the Cancer Support Community (CSC), including its Gilda's Club affiliates, is dedicated to ensuring that all people impacted by cancer are empowered by knowledge, strengthened by action and sustained by community. CSC achieves its mission through three areas: direct service delivery, research and advocacy. The organization includes an international network of Affiliates that offer the highest quality social and emotional support for people impacted by cancer, as well as a community of support available online and over the phone. The Research and Training Institute conducts cutting-edge psychosocial, behavioral and survivorship research. CSC furthers its focus on patient advocacy through its Cancer Policy Institute, informing public policy in Washington, D.C. and across the nation. For more information, please call the toll-free Cancer Support Helpline at 888-793-9355, or visit www.CancerSupportCommunity.org. So that no one faces cancer alone®

Loading Research and Training Institute collaborators
Loading Research and Training Institute collaborators