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College Station, TX, United States

Audenaert N.,Research and Technology Services | Houston N.M.,University of Houston
Proceedings - 2013 IEEE International Conference on Big Data, Big Data 2013 | Year: 2013

The large scale digitization of cultural heritage documents offers humanities researchers the opportunity to work with very large document collections. This paper describes VisualPage, a prototype system for the extraction and analysis of the visual features of digitized printed texts, such as page layout. © 2013 IEEE. Source


Bluvol G.,Research and Technology Services | Kassberger M.,Research and Technology Services | Reichhart Omya F.,Research and Technology Services | Nelson B.,Omya Inc.
Paper Conference and Trade Show 2010, PaperCon 2010 | Year: 2010

The paper industry has long known the potential advantages of running the highest coating solids possible from both a quality and economic standpoint. The limiting factor has always been blade runnability and coat weight control. The excellent rheology of calcium carbonate (GCC) has traditionally been used to increase the maximum solids level, but even with high levels of this material, the coating solids becomes quite demanding when very/ultra fine types are used to produce glossy grades. Work has been done using lab and pilot coater trials to evaluate the influence of pigment shape, size and particle size distribution on the upper solids limit of a coating formulation. The major impact of pigment packing once all other components in the formulation are optimized is theoretically characterized. A numerical model has been developed to describe and better visualize the influence of GCC particle size on the maximum volume fraction of the dispersed pigments. A simple but effective concept of blending a suitable coarse GCC fraction into the matrix of the fine host pigment is described and practical results presented. Source


Bluvol G.,Research and Technology Services | Kassberger M.,Research and Technology Services | Reichhart F.,Research and Technology Services
O Papel | Year: 2011

The paper industry has long known the potential advantages of running the highest possible coating solids from both a quality and economic standpoint. The limiting factor has always been blade runnability and coat weight control. The excellent rheology of calcium carbonate (GCC) has traditionally been used to increase the maximum solids level, but even with high levels of this material the coating solids becomes quite demanding when very/ultra fine types are used to produce glossy grades. Work has been done using lab and pilot coater trials to evaluate the influence of pigment shape, size and particle size distribution on the upper solids limit of a coating formulation. The major impact of pigment packing once all other components in the formulation are optimized is theoretically characterized. A numerical model has been developed to describe and better visualize the influence of GCC particle size on the maximum volume fraction of the dispersed pigments. A simple but effective concept of blending a suitable coarse GCC fraction into the matrix of the fine host pigment is described and practical results presented. Source


Bluvol G.,Research and Technology Services | Kassberger M.,Research and Technology Services | Reichhart F.,Research and Technology Services
O Papel | Year: 2011

Producers of coated papers are badly looking for any measure that might contribute to overall production cost reduction. In most of the cases the pigment system has already been optimized for the target optical properties. In the case of glossy grades, the use of 100% ultrafine calcium carbonate (GCC) is currently European state-of-the-art technology. Although needed for high sheet gloss development, ultrafine carbonates restrict the upper limit of solids content affordable for trouble-free blade runnability. Furthermore, the resulting very fast ink setting of these pigments associated with low binder level or inappropriate latex type often affects printability (backtrap mottling, print gloss). The work in hand aims to explain the significant impact of pigment fineness on rheology and hence the final solids content of the coating color. The effect of blending a suitable coarse GCC fraction into the ultrafine pigment is described and practical results presented. Source

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